Does anyone study GCSE Latin AND Spanish?

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Amethyst_
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Hey guys
Does anyone study GCSE Latin and Spanish (or french) ?

If you do, how is it studying both subjects as I'm not sure how hard it'll be ( for example too much memorisation )
Thanks
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username2775496
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Hi! Im doing both for GCSE at the moment. I put grammar points for each language on different colour flash cards so I can separate the two in my mind. I find that lots of spanish words come from latin words so making connections between the two languages helps as you are sort of doing both at the same time.
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pixiefuller
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(Original post by Amethyst_)
Hey guys
Does anyone study GCSE Latin and Spanish (or french) ?

If you do, how is it studying both subjects as I'm not sure how hard it'll be ( for example too much memorisation )
Thanks
I did GCSE Latin and French (my school didn't offer Spanish) and I found the subjects quite different. French had less grammar and there was writing and speaking involved, whereas Latin consisted of lots of grammar and translation. Both had a fair amount of vocab but I didn't find it too hard to remember everything (mind you I also took German!) and I learned vocab on the bus to school or whenever I had some spare time. I found Latin more similar to English as in Latin Lit. there is some analysis of words etc. so I found those two subjects a little easier. It shouldn't be hard for you if you enjoy them both and you might find that Latin is more similar to Spanish than you might think!
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Amethyst_
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(Original post by upbeat4)
Hi! Im doing both for GCSE at the moment. I put grammar points for each language on different colour flash cards so I can separate the two in my mind. I find that lots of spanish words come from latin words so making connections between the two languages helps as you are sort of doing both at the same time.
Hi thanks for your reply

In terms of workload, does it sometimes become too much studying both Spanish & latin as i feel i might have too much memorising to do alongside my 2 other gcse options triple science and geography.
Thanks!
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username2775496
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(Original post by Amethyst_)
Hi thanks for your reply

In terms of workload, does it sometimes become too much studying both Spanish & latin as i feel i might have too much memorising to do alongside my 2 other gcse options triple science and geography.
Thanks!
As well as Latin and Spanish, I'm doing triple science and history. For our end of year exams, I found that as long as you were fairly familiar with spanish vocab, you didnt need to spend as much time learning it. I had a couple of phrases that I remembered for the exam which I included in the writing. If you learn it as a phrase, it feels like less learning to do. For Latin literature, I used the chunking method where you remember the story in chunks. I had to read it over, memorise it, write it down, check it and repeat so learning the literature took longer. While looking at the translation, I looked at the most important techniques used, word order, cases and other stuff in each sentence or passage. For the language exam, I separated the vocab list into words that I did know and words that I was less familiar with and came up with something memorable to remember the tricky word. Like for example, to remember what quid meant, I would remember my latin teacher saying 'oh what do I have in my pocket? Its a quid!' So as I used these methods, I managed with the workload and got 95% as my average in latin.

I hope that this very waffly explanation helps.
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Amethyst_
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(Original post by upbeat4)
As well as Latin and Spanish, I'm doing triple science and history. For our end of year exams, I found that as long as you were fairly familiar with spanish vocab, you didnt need to spend as much time learning it. I had a couple of phrases that I remembered for the exam which I included in the writing. If you learn it as a phrase, it feels like less learning to do. For Latin literature, I used the chunking method where you remember the story in chunks. I had to read it over, memorise it, write it down, check it and repeat so learning the literature took longer. While looking at the translation, I looked at the most important techniques used, word order, cases and other stuff in each sentence or passage. For the language exam, I separated the vocab list into words that I did know and words that I was less familiar with and came up with something memorable to remember the tricky word. Like for example, to remember what quid meant, I would remember my latin teacher saying 'oh what do I have in my pocket? Its a quid!' So as I used these methods, I managed with the workload and got 95% as my average in latin.

I hope that this very waffly explanation helps.
Hi, yes it helped me a lot

did you find the content in latin interesting or did it become a bit boring? Also, how long would you say the latin literature text is? Thanks!
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MCPClark
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Hey I did GCSE Spanish and Latin. The good thing about the two is that they are both Romance languages so the vocab is sort of similar, or at least connected. For grammar, if you can grasp Latin grammar then Spanish is a lot easier: Spanish is like Latin but with the words in the right order
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As well as Latin and Spanish, I'm doing triple science and history. For our end of year exams, I found that as long as you were fairly familiar with spanish vocab, you didnt need to spend as much time learning it. I had a couple of phrases that I remembered for the exam which I included in the writing. If you learn it as a phrase, it feels like less learning to do. For Latin literature, I used the chunking method where you remember the story in chunks. I had to read it over, memorise it, write it down, check it and repeat so learning the literature took longer. While looking at the translation, I looked at the most important techniques used, word order, cases and other stuff in each sentence or passage. For the language exam, I separated the vocab list into words that I did know and words that I was less familiar with and came up with something memorable to remember the tricky word. Like for example, to remember what quid meant, I would remember my latin teacher saying 'oh what do I have in my pocket? Its a quid!' So as I used these methods, I managed with the workload and got 95% as my average in latin.



I hope that this very waffly explanation helps.


Hi, yes it helped me a lot



did you find the content in latin interesting or did it become a bit boring? Also, how long would you say the latin literature text is? Thanks!

I found latin literature really enjoyable, I've just finished translating and analysing Messalina today. At first, it will feel like a lot of work but once you get to know the story well, you will have lots of fun with it. We started Messalina at the end of February (I think) so it takes quite long to go through and we also need to do some Pliny and Virgil before the real exam. The language part of the GCSE is very grammar orientated but as long as you know what to look out for in the words, it will be fine. For the vocab, defnitely learn the genetive and the gender as well as the nominative form, it will really help when it comes to translations.

So far, I have enjoyed the course, its great fun once you get over all the learning but I have been advised to start learning vocab early so you won't have a mountainload of words to learn at the end.


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Amethyst_
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(Original post by MCPClark)
Hey I did GCSE Spanish and Latin. The good thing about the two is that they are both Romance languages so the vocab is sort of similar, or at least connected. For grammar, if you can grasp Latin grammar then Spanish is a lot easier: Spanish is like Latin but with the words in the right order
Hey thanks for your reply
In terms of memorisation+work in general, would you say Latin has a lot compared to spanish, and in general?
I dont want too much to memorise especially as i'm already doing Art which will take up lots of my time alongside triple sci.
Thanks
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Amethyst_
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Hi everyone, i heard that for one of the latin exams (i think latin literature), you have to memorise a set text. Has anyone done this and if so could you give a rough estimate on how long the text is?
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vessel
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I'm a little late but hey ho. I take Spanish, Latin, French and Ancient Greek. I don't think I've ever got confused between Spanish and Latin (occasionally between Spanish and French). So don't worry about that, in fact Latin is really helpful to figure out Spanish words & vice versa. However, I find Spanish easy and for me the workload isn't too much but the Latin workload is a lot.

The set texts we have done so far are not too long - one is a page (3 paragraphs) and the other is 8 sections so about a page and a half. You just need to find a way that suits you best to remember them - the hard work will pay off!!
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