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    how much money do you realistically need to make money with peer to peer lending
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    (Original post by john1332123)
    how much money do you realistically need to make money with peer to peer lending
    Depends what your goals are really, and how much you're willing to put in... I've never done p2p lending, but looking at Zopa, they say they predict about 3.5% on the most basic lending and recommend min £1000 in, though you can do as little as £10... Obviously, the more you put in, the more you'll get out... Might be worth looking here just to get an idea...
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    What do you mean?

    I've got peer to peer with ratesetter set up for 3.3% monthly access as part of my savings.
    http://link.ratesetter.com/uvImw1s

    As with anything though it's all about diversification, less than 10% of our savings are in there (with 60% stocks and shares and 30% other cash).

    The OP wasn't very clear so I'm not sure what is being asked but for every £1,000 we make about £32 per year
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    (Original post by Vereor)
    What do you mean?

    I've got peer to peer with ratesetter set up for 3.3% monthly access as part of my savings.
    http://link.ratesetter.com/uvImw1s

    As with anything though it's all about diversification, less than 10% of our savings are in there (with 60% stocks and shares and 30% other cash).

    The OP wasn't very clear so I'm not sure what is being asked but for every £1,000 we make about £32 per year
    My savings account which is much more than £1000 barely even gets £32pa... Have a feeling it might be worth me looking into these alternatives...!
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    (Original post by Vereor)
    What do you mean?

    I've got peer to peer with ratesetter set up for 3.3% monthly access as part of my savings.
    http://link.ratesetter.com/uvImw1s

    As with anything though it's all about diversification, less than 10% of our savings are in there (with 60% stocks and shares and 30% other cash).

    The OP wasn't very clear so I'm not sure what is being asked but for every £1,000 we make about £32 per year
    I agree, despite what these so called money millionaires tell us, diversification is important. You need to have a balanced platform, with some risk, but not too much. I would give you some links, but i'm not allowed. Google is your friend remember?
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    My savings account which is much more than £1000 barely even gets £32pa... Have a feeling it might be worth me looking into these alternatives...!
    It depends what the savings are for, we (my wife and I) keep various accounts for different reasons.

    Short term, emergency fund
    Current account linked savings account, 1.05% interest but accessible quickly. We tend to hold cash here for 3-4 weeks before moving it into longer term savings.

    Mid-term, Regular savings account
    (no longer open to new customers) gets 3.05% on £250 per month (1 withdrawal per year)

    Mid/long term, Ratesetter .
    Monthly contributions @ 3.3% - once this hits a certain figure I'll change future contributions to 3 year fixed @ 4.5%

    Long term, 10-15 years at least
    Stocks and shares ISA Currently seeing annualised returns of about 8%
    It would be 13% but I made a bad shout on Lloyds last year.

    Longest term, 30 years plus
    Pensions, my wife has a company pension and we pay in above the minimums. I have a private pension (which I'm not adding to at the moment) and a government pension (career average) which costs me so much per month.

    The ISA is by far the biggest and we put most of our monthly disposable income in there.
    That is well diversified between individual shares, bonds, index funds (both established and developing economies)
    We have slightly ambitious goals though, we both plan to be retired 50 and living in the countryside somewhere.

    Also - disclaimer.
    We're a little older than many on here will be, we've already bought a house, had the big flashy wedding and have no debt (aside from mortgage). Obviously I wouldn't advise sticking all your money away for 15 years plus if you've still got an overdraft and a credit card balance while living in a rented houseshare.
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    (Original post by Vereor)
    It depends what the savings are for, we (my wife and I) keep various accounts for different reasons.

    Short term, emergency fund
    Current account linked savings account, 1.05% interest but accessible quickly. We tend to hold cash here for 3-4 weeks before moving it into longer term savings.

    Mid-term, Regular savings account
    (no longer open to new customers) gets 3.05% on £250 per month (1 withdrawal per year)

    Mid/long term, Ratesetter .
    Monthly contributions @ 3.3% - once this hits a certain figure I'll change future contributions to 3 year fixed @ 4.5%

    Long term, 10-15 years at least
    Stocks and shares ISA Currently seeing annualised returns of about 8%
    It would be 13% but I made a bad shout on Lloyds last year.

    Longest term, 30 years plus
    Pensions, my wife has a company pension and we pay in above the minimums. I have a private pension (which I'm not adding to at the moment) and a government pension (career average) which costs me so much per month.

    The ISA is by far the biggest and we put most of our monthly disposable income in there.
    That is well diversified between individual shares, bonds, index funds (both established and developing economies)
    We have slightly ambitious goals though, we both plan to be retired 50 and living in the countryside somewhere.

    Also - disclaimer.
    We're a little older than many on here will be, we've already bought a house, had the big flashy wedding and have no debt (aside from mortgage). Obviously I wouldn't advise sticking all your money away for 15 years plus if you've still got an overdraft and a credit card balance while living in a rented houseshare.
    Isas don't earn this rate of return i'm afraid!
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Isas don't earn this rate of return i'm afraid!
    Erm, yes they do? You understand there are different types of ISA don't you?


    Google is your friend here, read up on stocks and shares ISA's and then come back.
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    (Original post by Vereor)
    Erm, yes they do? You understand there are different types of ISA don't you?


    Google is your friend here, read up on stocks and shares ISA's and then come back.
    Well it still doesn't say that. So again i'd like to know where you got your data from. Also there is a cap on the amount you can pay in to isas, which until recently was £5000 pa. So it is small change anyway. Okay granted they have upped this recently but seeing as you were talking about over 15 years, something doesn't add up in your posts im afraid to say.

    Google is my friend. She is yours too!? (interobang)
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Well it still doesn't say that. So again i'd like to know where you got your data from. Also there is a cap on the amount you can pay in to isas, which until recently was £5000 pa. So it is small change anyway. Okay granted they have upped this recently but seeing as you were talking about over 15 years, something doesn't add up in your posts im afraid to say.

    Google is my friend. She is yours too!? (interobang)
    Firstly, re-read my post. 15 years is my anticipated time frame for these investments. I'm currently on year 2.
    As an example of my investments (because it is a stocks and shares ISA) some of my portfolio is in this fund...
    http://www.hl.co.uk/funds/fund-disco...y-accumulation

    year 1 return (first year I invested) = .63%
    year 2 return (second year I held the investment) = 19.06%

    Average annualised return = 9.84%

    As I stated in my post my quoted returns were the figures I AM SEEING, I'm not getting the data from anywhere except my ISA.

    Do you understand how investment ISA's work? I fear I'm completely wasting my time.

    What do you mean something doesn't add up? I've not given you any numbers to add up, wtf are you even talking about?
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    (Original post by Vereor)
    Firstly, re-read my post. 15 years is my anticipated time frame for these investments. I'm currently on year 2.
    As an example of my investments (because it is a stocks and shares ISA) some of my portfolio is in this fund...
    http://www.hl.co.uk/funds/fund-disco...y-accumulation

    year 1 return = .63%
    year 2 return = 19.06%

    Average annualised return = 9.84%

    You know that the percentage return is not impacted by the amount invested, so the annual limits have no relevance.

    Do you understand how investment ISA's work? I fear I'm completely wasting my time.

    What do you mean something doesn't add up? I've not given you any numbers to add up, wtf are you even talking about?
    sorry if i'm not thinking straight, but i've just found out that my barclay card application has been accepted! get in!!!
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    (Original post by Vereor)
    What do you mean?


    The OP wasn't very clear so I'm not sure what is being asked but for every £1,000 we make about £32 per year
    That's pretty low payout... you'd be better off just buying shares in Apple or something and saving the dividends, it will be the same amount of payments (30 odd quid) but there's a likelihood that one day your shares will have an increased value and you can just sell them for a profit, plus the dividends would be a much better deal than this 3.2% annual interest
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    (Original post by JavaScriptMaster)
    That's pretty low payout... you'd be better off just buying shares in Apple or something and saving the dividends, it will be the same amount of payments (30 odd quid) but there's a likelihood that one day your shares will have an increased value and you can just sell them for a profit, plus the dividends would be a much better deal than this 3.2% annual interest
    You've just cherry picked part of my post and ignored the bit where I said that most of our money is in stocks and shares and I only use P2P for diversfication?
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    (Original post by Vereor)
    You've just cherry picked part of my post and ignored the bit where I said that most of our money is in stocks and shares and I only use P2P for diversfication?
    Lol how embarrassing, to be fair it's just one line I missed. Anyway, you seem to know what your doing so crack on
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    (Original post by JavaScriptMaster)
    Lol how embarrassing, to be fair it's just one line I missed. Anyway, you seem to know what your doing so crack on
    Along with the other guy telling me that it's impossible to get 8% returns from the stock market I was beginning to think I was being trolled Sorry if I was a bit blunt
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    (Original post by Vereor)
    Along with the other guy telling me that it's impossible to get 8% returns from the stock market I was beginning to think I was being trolled Sorry if I was a bit blunt
    Lol 8% is like the standard for someone who's been educated or trained in stocks even a little bit
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    (Original post by john1332123)
    how much money do you realistically need to make money with peer to peer lending
    best one is a car based on that supplies uber drivers and you need £7,000 to buy half a car which is what I have with them at the moment but if it pays off then I will increase it and it better than standard peer to peer as the car is a cover funds owing
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    (Original post by Vereor)
    What do you mean?

    I've got peer to peer with ratesetter set up for 3.3% monthly access as part of my savings.
    http://link.ratesetter.com/uvImw1s

    As with anything though it's all about diversification, less than 10% of our savings are in there (with 60% stocks and shares and 30% other cash).

    The OP wasn't very clear so I'm not sure what is being asked but for every £1,000 we make about £32 per year
    '£1,000 we make about £32 per year' thats what i was asking thanks
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    (Original post by john1332123)
    how much money do you realistically need to make money with peer to peer lending
    it sounds like a scam to me, to be honest with you?!?
 
 
 
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