Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    This year I finished year 11 and GCSE's. Feel free to ask me any questions about my experience or if you want any tips or advice for year 10 and 11.

    If your wondering I took biology, chemistry, physics, English literature and language, maths, PE, RE, Spanish, art, DT, geography.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by amyjf)
    This year I finished year 11 and GCSE's. Feel free to ask me any questions about my experience or if you want any tips or advice for year 10 and 11.

    If your wondering I took biology, chemistry, physics, English literature and language, maths, PE, RE, Spanish, art, DT, geography.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Do you recommend revising over the summer holidays of Year 10? When do you recommend revising for mocks and the real GCSE? Any tips and techniques for getting straight A*s?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by daniella.14)
    Do you recommend revising over the summer holidays of Year 10? When do you recommend revising for mocks and the real GCSE? Any tips and techniques for getting straight A*s?
    Firstly, no need to revise over year 10
    Summer! Just revise well for topic tests and year 10 mocks and you will be fine.

    For mocks, as mine were after Christmas I started revising about 2.5 weeks before. This may seem not very long but we hadn't get finished all the spec so I didn't have as many exams and for some subjects they decided only to test us on recent content.

    For real exams I started lightly revising around early March, about 1.5hrs a day. I started full on revision in Easter holidays (5-6hrs a day in Easter). After Easter I tried for 2hrs a day leading up to exams. We also revised during school so this was fine.

    I wasn't a straight A* student but I'm pretty happy with how I did.
    6A*'s 6A's (getting a couple remarked so this may change)

    I got an A* in- Biology, Chemistry, Physics, English Literature, PE, Geography

    I got A's in- Maths, DT, RE, English Language, Art, Spanish

    Overall I was quite happy, although I really wanted A* in RE and English Language. These were very close which was incredibly annoying.

    My tips for science would be use all the past papers and troll the mark schemes as questions often repeat. Use the spec and past papers for geography too. For PE I made flashcards and my teacher was really good so that was a bonus. For English I watched Mr Beuff YouTube- he is very good I highly recommend. Maths just do all the past papers.

    All A*'s is defiantly possible but even though I didn't achieve this I hope you find this info useful. I got full UMS on half of my exams so I was pretty pleased with how they went overall. Personally I think if you want straight A* it helps to pick the subjects that you are really good at, for me I wasn't necessarily brilliant at art and DT but I enjoyed them so I took them to give me a variety of academic and creative subjects. Also my school made us take a language, which is good I guess but I didn't really enjoy it as I didn't find it interesting.

    Do yes that's my GCSE experience in a nutshell, any other questions just ask away!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by amyjf)
    Firstly, no need to revise over year 10
    Summer! Just revise well for topic tests and year 10 mocks and you will be fine.

    For mocks, as mine were after Christmas I started revising about 2.5 weeks before. This may seem not very long but we hadn't get finished all the spec so I didn't have as many exams and for some subjects they decided only to test us on recent content.

    For real exams I started lightly revising around early March, about 1.5hrs a day. I started full on revision in Easter holidays (5-6hrs a day in Easter). After Easter I tried for 2hrs a day leading up to exams. We also revised during school so this was fine.

    I wasn't a straight A* student but I'm pretty happy with how I did.
    6A*'s 6A's (getting a couple remarked so this may change)

    I got an A* in- Biology, Chemistry, Physics, English Literature, PE, Geography

    I got A's in- Maths, DT, RE, English Language, Art, Spanish

    Overall I was quite happy, although I really wanted A* in RE and English Language. These were very close which was incredibly annoying.

    My tips for science would be use all the past papers and troll the mark schemes as questions often repeat. Use the spec and past papers for geography too. For PE I made flashcards and my teacher was really good so that was a bonus. For English I watched Mr Beuff YouTube- he is very good I highly recommend. Maths just do all the past papers.

    All A*'s is defiantly possible but even though I didn't achieve this I hope you find this info useful. I got full UMS on half of my exams so I was pretty pleased with how they went overall. Personally I think if you want straight A* it helps to pick the subjects that you are really good at, for me I wasn't necessarily brilliant at art and DT but I enjoyed them so I took them to give me a variety of academic and creative subjects. Also my school made us take a language, which is good I guess but I didn't really enjoy it as I didn't find it interesting.

    Do yes that's my GCSE experience in a nutshell, any other questions just ask away!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Do you think making notes and flashcards in advance (like the summer holidays of year 10) saves time in Year 11? Also, do you think A* students start revising really early? I just like to do things really early (like 9 months before the exams) because I really want to do well and I cannot cram in a short time and I feel more confident knowing I have gone over the content repeatedly.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by daniella.14)
    Do you think making notes and flashcards in advance (like the summer holidays of year 10) saves time in Year 11? Also, do you think A* students start revising really early? I just like to do things really early (like 9 months before the exams) because I really want to do well and I cannot cram in a short time and I feel more confident knowing I have gone over the content repeatedly.
    For me I made my revision notes as I went along for each topic test I did at school during year 10 and 11. This meant I didn't have to make them once I started revising so instead of learning I was just going over. Some of my friends got almost straight A*'s and they stated revising around the same time as me, 3 months before. Personally with 9 months I would forget most of the stuff and burn myself out but it's up to you. For me 3 months wasn't really cramming as I never felt I was running out of time. As I worked consistently during my GCSE years i didn't get to the end and have loads to do as I had already done it.

    In short, if you revise consistently for topic tests and mocks you will by the end gone over the content at least 3 times if not more so it will be pretty ingrained! The earliest I would recommend to start would be about January but I was so exhausted after mocks I had to give myself a break.




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm switching over from an American curriculum school to start my IGCSEs. I'm taking maths, English language, chemistry, biology, and history this year (physics, psychology, English literature, French, and possibly additional maths next year). I'm not sure why -- maybe the American system moves at a faster pace - but maths, English language, and a lot of the biology seem so easy to me. I know at least half but probably almost 3/4 of the math course (which has questions like "Convert 9/15 to a decimal" and "What is the temperature shown on this thermometer," and English seems really easy. The first chapter is "Reading Skills" like scanning, skimming, reading for information, etc, and other topics include formal writing (for example, not using the word 'like' as in "It's, like, so amazing.") and stuff like that.
    I'm not really worried about it because I'm taking the extended options, so at worst I'll be bored but still prepared for A-Levels, but I'm really wondering: are the GCSEs are more rigorous or difficult compared to the IGCSEs?
    Also, once I get to university, I'm probably going to study either physics or bio- / biomedical engineering (I'd like to work in doing research and creating artificial organs and prosthesis) (or possibly neuroscience), so I'd like to take additional maths next year as an IGCSE, but the problem is that no schools I can go to offer it. Would I still be prepared for the math A-levels if I don't take it, or should I try to study it by myself and go to a testing center at the end of the year? And if I drop additional math, what course should I take instead? Do you think it's worth it to take psychology if I'm probably not going to study neuroscience, and if so, what should I take instead?
    Hope this isn't too long...thanks!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by khadija15)
    I'm switching over from an American curriculum school to start my IGCSEs. I'm taking maths, English language, chemistry, biology, and history this year (physics, psychology, English literature, French, and possibly additional maths next year). I'm not sure why -- maybe the American system moves at a faster pace - but maths, English language, and a lot of the biology seem so easy to me. I know at least half but probably almost 3/4 of the math course (which has questions like "Convert 9/15 to a decimal" and "What is the temperature shown on this thermometer," and English seems really easy. The first chapter is "Reading Skills" like scanning, skimming, reading for information, etc, and other topics include formal writing (for example, not using the word 'like' as in "It's, like, so amazing.") and stuff like that.
    I'm not really worried about it because I'm taking the extended options, so at worst I'll be bored but still prepared for A-Levels, but I'm really wondering: are the GCSEs are more rigorous or difficult compared to the IGCSEs?
    Also, once I get to university, I'm probably going to study either physics or bio- / biomedical engineering (I'd like to work in doing research and creating artificial organs and prosthesis) (or possibly neuroscience), so I'd like to take additional maths next year as an IGCSE, but the problem is that no schools I can go to offer it. Would I still be prepared for the math A-levels if I don't take it, or should I try to study it by myself and go to a testing center at the end of the year? And if I drop additional math, what course should I take instead? Do you think it's worth it to take psychology if I'm probably not going to study neuroscience, and if so, what should I take instead?
    Hope this isn't too long...thanks!
    No problem about the length! I'll try answer as best I can!

    For your first question, I'm honestly not too sure about the difference between GCSE and IGCSE. I took one IGCSE (English language) and also normal GCSE English language but over in England it's usually only private schools that do IGCSE. From my experience the English exams were very different, for this exam anyway IGCSE was simpler (pick out facts, rewrite them etc) and GCSE involved more creative aspects (creative and persuasive writing, analytical skills). I personally found them both difficult in their own ways but I recommend if you want to know more about IGCSE you ask someone on here who is privately educated.

    I haven't started a levels yet but I have heard there is a big jump. I think any maths (IGCSE) will be fine to take as over here all the exams a pretty similar no matter what exam board you are on. I'm sure any maths course will prepare you somewhat for a level maths.

    As far as psychology, if you enjoy it I would take it but if not don't bother. Universities are only really interested in your a level grades and maths/English/science grades. Just make sure your a level options match what you want to study at uni and you'll be fine.

    Hope this is of some help!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Are unpaid trial work shifts fair?
    Useful resources

    Study tools

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Thinking about uni already?

    Thinking about uni already?

    See where you can apply with our uni match tool

    Student chat

    Ask a question

    Chat to other GCSE students and get your study questions answered.

    Creating

    Make study resources

    Create all the resources you need to get the grades.

    Planner

    Create your own Study Plan

    Organise all your homework and exams so you never miss another deadline.

    Resources by subject

    From flashcards to mind maps; there's everything you need for all of your GCSE subjects.

    Papers

    Find past papers

    100s of GCSE past papers for all your subjects at your fingertips.

    Help out other students

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.