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How hard is it to get a "good" job with chemistry degree?

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    I am really want to do a chemistry Msci but lets say that if 5 years later I get a first, at a elite uni (e.g imperial), doing a year in industry,summer placement, extracurricular activities,I still cant land a good "science" job it wont be worth it.

    I strongly feel there is no point in doing a chemistry degree if I am then going to go into an unrelated job that does not fully utilize the knowledge I've learnt rather only use the skills I gained e.g numeracy, problem solving, reasoning.
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    As far as I am aware a Chemistry degree especially from a top uni, will tell employers that you are very smart. If you have the extra curricular, skills, experience etc to back it up there is nothing stopping you. Margaret Thatcher did a Chemistry degree, so the sky is the limit, you are just thinking negatively you go out there give it your 100%. As long as you are interested in chem then its all good
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    (Original post by ShadowStorm689)
    I am really want to do a chemistry Msci but lets say that if 5 years later I get a first, at a elite uni (e.g imperial), doing a year in industry,summer placement, extracurricular activities,I still cant land a good "science" job it wont be worth it.

    I strongly feel there is no point in doing a chemistry degree if I am then going to go into an unrelated job that does not fully utilize the knowledge I've learnt rather only use the skills I gained e.g numeracy, problem solving, reasoning.
    Pretty sure with the right attitude towards finding work experience and getting involved highly outwith school work, which in turn gets you interviews which you manage to do well on, and then on an internship itself, impress enough to get a return offer for after graduating, you'll be set.

    But, it's easier said than done and most people don't have the right attitude, nor patience, nor interest, to research their career options.

    And 'science' jobs are usually after you've done a masters or PhD, not after undergrad - however there are exceptions with e.g. pharmaceuticals companies, oil and gas etc..

    Anyway, given a normal grad job market and the above things, mixed in with effort on your behalf (to both execute the above + keep up good grades whilst at a top university), you'll be alright.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Pretty sure with the right attitude towards finding work experience and getting involved highly outwith school work, which in turn gets you interviews which you manage to do well on, and then on an internship itself, impress enough to get a return offer for after graduating, you'll be set.

    But, it's easier said than done and most people don't have the right attitude, nor patience, nor interest, to research their career options.

    And 'science' jobs are usually after you've done a masters or PhD, not after undergrad - however there are exceptions with e.g. pharmaceuticals companies, oil and gas etc..

    Anyway, given a normal grad job market and the above things, mixed in with effort on your behalf (to both execute the above + keep up good grades whilst at a top university), you'll be alright.

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    Could you do a masters if you've done a Bsc?
    Or should I change to do an Msci in year 2 depending on how well I do?


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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    Could you do a masters if you've done a Bsc?
    Or should I change to do an Msci in year 2 depending on how well I do?


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    You can do either

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    And 'science' jobs are usually after you've done a masters or PhD, not after undergrad - however there are exceptions with e.g. pharmaceuticals companies, oil and gas etc..
    Wait I though an undergraduate masters (MSci) is equivalent to a postgraduate masters (Msc)?
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    (Original post by ShadowStorm689)
    Wait I though an undergraduate masters (MSci) is equivalent to a postgraduate masters (Msc)?
    Yh, but it was more emphasis on the PhD really.

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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    Could you do a masters if you've done a Bsc?
    Or should I change to do an Msci in year 2 depending on how well I do?


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    MSci would cost less
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    MSci would cost less
    That's true
    It's because at my university, they don't offer Msci with a year in industry. Only bsc with a year in industry.
    But they do allow me to change from a bsc to a Msci in year 2.


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    (Original post by ShadowStorm689)
    Wait I though an undergraduate masters (MSci) is equivalent to a postgraduate masters (Msc)?
    It's not, a MSci is lesser than a proper MSc but practically it doesn't make a huge difference

    (Original post by ShadowStorm689)
    I am really want to do a chemistry Msci but lets say that if 5 years later I get a first, at a elite uni (e.g imperial), doing a year in industry,summer placement, extracurricular activities,I still cant land a good "science" job it wont be worth it.

    I strongly feel there is no point in doing a chemistry degree if I am then going to go into an unrelated job that does not fully utilize the knowledge I've learnt rather only use the skills I gained e.g numeracy, problem solving, reasoning.
    If you do a year in placement, summer placement etc there's no reason you won't be able to get science jobs. But as Princepieman says the vast majority will be for those doing PhD's- especially research type roles. However there are grad schemes with companies like GSK or AstraZeneca which overlap chemistry with pharmaceuticals, and if you get the experience you're talking about you'll be a shoe-in for them
    (There are also "normal" science jobs like lab technicians but they're rather poorly paid, with little chance of progression...)

    From what I've seen of the chemists at my uni, most stay on for further education or do something completely different upon graduation. My future remains to be seen :lol: (I'm a chemistry student at Oxford)
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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    That's true
    It's because at my university, they don't offer Msci with a year in industry. Only bsc with a year in industry.
    But they do allow me to change from a bsc to a Msci in year 2.


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    The Year in Industry is more useful than the MSci I think. What do you do in your MSci year? Research project?
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    (Original post by Poooky)
    The Year in Industry is more useful than the MSci I think. What do you do in your MSci year? Research project?
    Yeahh, a research project, professional skills for chemists and other optional modules.



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    Thoughts on the Imperial course " Msci Chemistry with a Year in Industry". Its the only degree that I've seen that is 5 years + experience compared to other unis like Bath which are 4 years+ experience. Anyone know why Imperial is 5 years?
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    (Original post by Poooky)
    It's not, a MSci is lesser than a proper MSc but practically it doesn't make a huge difference



    If you do a year in placement, summer placement etc there's no reason you won't be able to get science jobs. But as Pricepieman says the vast majority will be for those doing PhD's- especially research type roles. However there are grad schemes with companies like GSK or AstraZeneca which overlap chemistry with pharmaceuticals, and if you get the experience you're talking about you'll be a shoe-in for them
    (There are also "normal" science jobs like lab technicians but they're rather poorly paid, with little chance of progression...)

    From what I've seen of the chemists at my uni, most stay on for further education or do something completely different upon graduation. My future remains to be seen :lol: (I'm a chemistry student at Oxford)
    The problem I've seen with the Oxford chemistry course is that because it is an integrated masters, you cant do a year in industry which is really restrictive. Also since Oxford is a very academic uni, they encourage their students to go onto Phd so im not sure whether they have good links to industry as compared to bath,imperial? etc...
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    (Original post by ShadowStorm689)
    The problem I've seen with the Oxford chemistry course is that because it is an integrated masters, you cant do a year in industry which is really restrictive. Also since Oxford is a very academic uni, they encourage their students to go onto Phd so im not sure whether they have good links to industry as compared to bath,imperial? etc...
    I agree with the course being restrictive, which is why I said above that personally I would do the Year in Industry over the MSci. Imperial is great in that you can do both!
    We do our Masters year in a research lab for the entire year, so if the research we do is particularly going well/we've enjoyed the year they may encourage us to continue but that's the extent of it Regarding industry links that's probably true Though you can still do placements/internships in summer so you won't be too disadvantaged
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    (Original post by Poooky)
    I agree with the course being restrictive, which is why I said above that personally I would do the Year in Industry over the MSci. Imperial is great in that you can do both!
    We do our Masters year in a research lab for the entire year, so if the research we do is particularly going well/we've enjoyed the year they may encourage us to continue but that's the extent of it Regarding industry links that's probably true Though you can still do placements/internships in summer so you won't be too disadvantaged
    How do you apply for placements and internships?
    And when do you rccomend doing this?
    I'm starting my first year this September and chemistry is a course that I've always was interested in but never actually applied for until last minute which was through clearing as I was really confused on what to do with my future.
    But now I'm certain that I've picked the right course, I'm just not sure about my future with chemistry and whether I'd like industry.,


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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    How do you apply for placements and internships?
    And when do you rccomend doing this?
    I'm starting my first year this September and chemistry is a course that I've always was interested in but never actually applied for until last minute which was through clearing as I was really confused on what to do with my future.
    But now I'm certain that I've picked the right course, I'm just not sure about my future with chemistry and whether I'd like industry.,


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    Online or through the university's intranet (if they have any special agreements) or through word of mouth/just emailing places.

    Formal summer programmes are usually only for people in their penultimate year of university. If you're talking about finding industrial placements for your year in industry, then that would be at the start of second year.

    As for your future, you literally can do whatever - I'd suggest you start looking at careers now and think about where you'd want to end up. Sites like InsideCareers, TargetJobs, AllAboutCareers, StudentLadder etc are all very informative. Do try just googling stuff too.

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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    Yeahh, a research project, professional skills for chemists and other optional modules.
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    I've just realised that although industrial experience is better (grad) job-wise, doing the Masters will depend on your job aspirations. For example if you definitely want to stay in chemistry, you may want to get Chartered Chemist status, which depends on you having an accredited Masters level degree (there are other requirements of course.) In which case if you did the BSc you'd then need to do another MSc on top!

    Sorry for the conflicting advice

    And as for the internships and placements, Princepieman is right and I don't have anything to add! It may be useful for you to get acquainted with your universities Career service, they can help as well
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    (Original post by Poooky)
    I've just realised that although industrial experience is better (grad) job-wise, doing the Masters will depend on your job aspirations. For example if you definitely want to stay in chemistry, you may want to get Chartered Chemist status, which depends on you having an accredited Masters level degree (there are other requirements of course.) In which case if you did the BSc you'd then need to do another MSc on top!

    Sorry for the conflicting advice

    And as for the internships and placements, Princepieman is right and I don't have anything to add! It may be useful for you to get acquainted with your universities Career service, they can help as well
    Thank you so much! The advice is much appreciated!
    Ooh okay, so I guess it will totally depend on the career I'm going to be in. The bsc and Msci course is exactly the same for the first two years so I guess I'll decide at the end of second year


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Online or through the university's intranet (if they have any special agreements) or through word of mouth/just emailing places.

    Formal summer programmes are usually only for people in their penultimate year of university. If you're talking about finding industrial placements for your year in industry, then that would be at the start of second year.

    As for your future, you literally can do whatever - I'd suggest you start looking at careers now and think about where you'd want to end up. Sites like InsideCareers, TargetJobs, AllAboutCareers, StudentLadder etc are all very informative. Do try just googling stuff too.

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    Thank you for the advice!! Genuinely helped!
    Student ladder is one of the best websites out there!!
    There are many undergraduate minter ships for first years too so I'll be looking to apply


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