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    im currently entering year 13 and was considering picking it up as an extra AS level. i want to do a maths with economics degree at UCL. if i were to pick it up i would do S3, S4, FP3/M3
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    (Original post by Nuggetsarelife)
    im currently entering year 13 and was considering picking it up as an extra AS level. i want to do a maths with economics degree at UCL. if i were to pick it up i would do S3, S4, FP3/M3
    What A-levels are you doing at the moment?

    If you can cope with the extra workload.. I suppose S3/S4/FP3 would be a nice combination.
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    What A-levels are you doing at the moment?

    If you can cope with the extra workload.. I suppose S3/S4/FP3 would be a nice combination.
    Maths
    Further Maths
    Economics
    Dropped Physics
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    (Original post by Nuggetsarelife)
    Maths
    Further Maths
    Economics
    Dropped Physics
    Only if you breath maths, eat maths, drink maths and **** maths
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    is maths and further maths not already giving you enough maths, why are you doing so many mathsy subjects, are you gonna become the next Einstein or something, has your brain not exploded from all the maths yet? I'm struggling with GCSE maths and your doing all of these maths subjects, WHY!?
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    (Original post by PHD2027)
    is maths and further maths not already giving you enough maths, why are you doing so many mathsy subjects, are you gonna become the next Einstein or something, has your brain not exploded from all the maths yet? I'm struggling with GCSE maths and your doing all of these maths subjects, WHY!?
    Hehe GCSE Maths is poo compared to A Level you think ur struggling Ha thats hilarious
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    I pretty much did just that. The school taught me S3, and I picked up S4 and FP3 on my own.

    Edexcel Maths is really easy to self study. S3 and S4 would probably take less than a week of intense study each, and then when you start doing past year papers you'll realise that they only ask the same stuff every year. S3 is really, really tedious and you have to draw lots and lots of tables and punching in digits after digits into your calculator. S4 is a lot less tedious in comparison but again, it's just memorising the procedures, and it's also a lot shorter than S3. If I had to rate the difficulty of the statistics exams based on how challenging the exams questions can get (once you've mastered all the topics) it would go S1 > S2 > S4 > S3. FP3 can be a little more tricky and it would take a bit more time but it's still very doable (and a lot of fun if you like A Level maths).

    I'll definitely support you if you decide to do it. Remember that you can look for complete worked solutions for every single exercise in the textbook, which really helps. All you really need is some time and motivation. Just be careful because there can sometimes be mistakes in the solution bank.

    I'll give you a rundown of how I found the difficulty of each chapter.

    S3

    Combinations of random variables:
    This might be slightly tricky at first but once you get the hang of it, you'll realise that it's just a small extension to the normal distribution chapter in S1.

    Sampling:
    This is one of those qualitative explanation type of chapter. You'll have to know how to describe a few sampling methods (the 3 mark explanation questions follow the same pattern every year. check the mark schemes from past year papers to learn how to answer them) and the pros and cons of each method.

    Estimation, confidence intervals and tests:
    This would be the heaviest chapter in S3. There's quite a bit to take in, especially if you're the type of person who tries to understand what you're doing. But most of my friends never bothered because the Edexcel syllabus never seem to expect you to know what's going on. Just follow the procedures and you'll be fine.

    I remember having a bit of trouble understanding what estimators are but it will eventually click. Really, really long chapter though, so you'll need a lot of patience to go though this.

    Goodness of fit and contingency tests:
    Might be confusing at first and it's quite overwhelming because you need to know how to apply the goodness of fit tests to all the distributions that you've learnt so far, but once you get it, it's simply a matter of following the procedure.

    Contingency tests are really simple. Just don't mix your H0 and H1 up.

    Regression and correlation:
    This is by far the easiest chapter of all. There's zero variation every year. Just be careful when doing calculations and you're set.

    S4

    Quality of tests and estimators:
    It's a pretty long chapter and it's the only chapter that can give you any questions that are remotely challenging in this module. Type I and type II errors are easy once you get the hang of it, but the power functions and estimators can get slightly heavy on the algebra at times. It's definitely my favourite part of this module. Check the 2011 or the 2016 papers for some interesting estimator questions.

    One-sample procedures:
    You'll first be introduced to the t-distribution, which is just the normal distribution on another table, and you'll be doing the same confidence intervals stuff that you learnt in Chapter 3 of S3. Then you'll learn how to do that for the variance instead of the mean. This was a bit strange at first because we weren't introduced to what the chi-squared distribution really is before this. But pretty soon you'll realise that it's just another plug and chug.

    Two-sample procedures:
    You'll learn about the F-distribution, which is done to check if the variance of two samples are the same, just like how you checked if the mean of two samples are the same in Chapter 3 of S3. There's a bunch more stuff but it won't take very long. Again, it's just memorising the procedures.

    FP3

    Hyperbolic functions:
    Probably the easiest chapter. You'll learn the definitions of the hyperbolic sine and cosine functions, and then form there on it's just lots of algebra. It's pretty fun. The only prerequisite is C3.

    Further coordinate systems:
    This chapter can be quite difficult. You've learnt about the rectangular hyperbola and the parabola in FP1. Now you're just doing it for the ellipse and the hyperbola. Quite a bit of derivations to learn. Locus questions can get quite interesting.

    Differentiation:
    A straight up continuation of Chapter 1. It's really short.

    Integration:
    You'll learn more integration techniques with trig substitutions. It's really fun if you enjoyed doing integration questions in C4. And then you'll get to the reduction formula chapter, which can get really, really messy if you're not organised enough. It's fun but you'll need a bit of practice. And in the last part you'll learn how to use integration to find arc lengths and surface areas, which is really just another plug and chug, then integrate as usual.

    Vectors:
    If you found C4 vectors hard you're not going to like this chapter. Questions are really standard but you need to know what to do. I strongly recommend looking at videos by Exam Solutions for this topic. It's really easy once you've learnt all the techniques, but until you do, it might be hell.

    Further matrix algebra:
    This chapter is all about following procedures. Eigenvectors is an interesting concept to try to understand, but most people just don't bother. There's a huge part on linear transformations using matrices in the textbook but I've barely seen any questions of this sort asked in past papers (although they could surprise you this year). Questions on matrices could've gotten really challenging but if you're doing this current Edexcel syllabus, it never really gets to that point. They won't teach you to do much with it. For example, they teach you how to diagonalise matrices but they don't follow it up with any applications. This chapter is really underwhelming when compared to other exam boards.

    That's about all I can think of from the top of my head. Good luck!
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    (Original post by scykei)
    I pretty much did just that. The school taught me S3, and I picked up S4 and FP3 on my own.

    Edexcel Maths is really easy to self study. S3 and S4 would probably take less than a week of intense study each, and then when you start doing past year papers you'll realise that they only ask the same stuff every year. S3 is really, really tedious and you have to draw lots and lots of tables and punching in digits after digits into your calculator. S4 is a lot less tedious in comparison but again, it's just memorising the procedures, and it's also a lot shorter than S3. If I had to rate the difficulty of the statistics exams based on how challenging the exams questions can get (once you've mastered all the topics) it would go S1 > S2 > S4 > S3. FP3 can be a little more tricky and it would take a bit more time but it's still very doable (and a lot of fun if you like A Level maths).

    I'll definitely support you if you decide to do it. Remember that you can look for complete worked solutions for every single exercise in the textbook, which really helps. All you really need is some time and motivation. Just be careful because there can sometimes be mistakes in the solution bank.

    I'll give you a rundown of how I found the difficulty of each chapter.

    S3

    Combinations of random variables:
    This might be slightly tricky at first but once you get the hang of it, you'll realise that it's just a small extension to the normal distribution chapter in S1.

    Sampling:
    This is one of those qualitative explanation type of chapter. You'll have to know how to describe a few sampling methods (the 3 mark explanation questions follow the same pattern every year. check the mark schemes from past year papers to learn how to answer them) and the pros and cons of each method.

    Estimation, confidence intervals and tests:
    This would be the heaviest chapter in S3. There's quite a bit to take in, especially if you're the type of person who tries to understand what you're doing. But most of my friends never bothered because the Edexcel syllabus never seem to expect you to know what's going on. Just follow the procedures and you'll be fine.

    I remember having a bit of trouble understanding what estimators are but it will eventually click. Really, really long chapter though, so you'll need a lot of patience to go though this.

    Goodness of fit and contingency tests:
    Might be confusing at first and it's quite overwhelming because you need to know how to apply the goodness of fit tests to all the distributions that you've learnt so far, but once you get it, it's simply a matter of following the procedure.

    Contingency tests are really simple. Just don't mix your H0 and H1 up.

    Regression and correlation:
    This is by far the easiest chapter of all. There's zero variation every year. Just be careful when doing calculations and you're set.

    S4

    Quality of tests and estimators:
    It's a pretty long chapter and it's the only chapter that can give you any questions that are remotely challenging in this module. Type I and type II errors are easy once you get the hang of it, but the power functions and estimators can get slightly heavy on the algebra at times. It's definitely my favourite part of this module. Check the 2011 or the 2016 papers for some interesting estimator questions.

    One-sample procedures:
    You'll first be introduced to the t-distribution, which is just the normal distribution on another table, and you'll be doing the same confidence intervals stuff that you learnt in Chapter 3 of S3. Then you'll learn how to do that for the variance instead of the mean. This was a bit strange at first because we weren't introduced to what the chi-squared distribution really is before this. But pretty soon you'll realise that it's just another plug and chug.

    Two-sample procedures:
    You'll learn about the F-distribution, which is done to check if the variance of two samples are the same, just like how you checked if the mean of two samples are the same in Chapter 3 of S3. There's a bunch more stuff but it won't take very long. Again, it's just memorising the procedures.

    FP3

    Hyperbolic functions:
    Probably the easiest chapter. You'll learn the definitions of the hyperbolic sine and cosine functions, and then form there on it's just lots of algebra. It's pretty fun. The only prerequisite is C3.

    Further coordinate systems:
    This chapter can be quite difficult. You've learnt about the rectangular hyperbola and the parabola in FP1. Now you're just doing it for the ellipse and the hyperbola. Quite a bit of derivations to learn. Locus questions can get quite interesting.

    Differentiation:
    A straight up continuation of Chapter 1. It's really short.

    Integration:
    You'll learn more integration techniques with trig substitutions. It's really fun if you enjoyed doing integration questions in C4. And then you'll get to the reduction formula chapter, which can get really, really messy if you're not organised enough. It's fun but you'll need a bit of practice. And in the last part you'll learn how to use integration to find arc lengths and surface areas, which is really just another plug and chug, then integrate as usual.

    Vectors:
    If you found C4 vectors hard you're not going to like this chapter. Questions are really standard but you need to know what to do. I strongly recommend looking at videos by Exam Solutions for this topic. It's really easy once you've learnt all the techniques, but until you do, it might be hell.

    Further matrix algebra:
    This chapter is all about following procedures. Eigenvectors is an interesting concept to try to understand, but most people just don't bother. There's a huge part on linear transformations using matrices in the textbook but I've barely seen any questions of this sort asked in past papers (although they could surprise you this year). Questions on matrices could've gotten really challenging but if you're doing this current Edexcel syllabus, it never really gets to that point. They won't teach you to do much with it. For example, they teach you how to diagonalise matrices but they don't follow it up with any applications. This chapter is really underwhelming when compared to other exam boards.

    That's about all I can think of from the top of my head. Good luck!
    Thank you for this it really helps
 
 
 
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