What next for Northern Ireland? Watch

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#1
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The British Army's military operations in Northern Ireland have come to an end after 38 years as troops revert to garrison duty.

Operation Banner is the Army's longest continuous campaign and was originally set up to support the Northern Ireland police force against terrorism.

Since 1969, more than 300,000 personnel have served in Northern Ireland with 763 directly killed by paramilitaries.

From Wednesday, the Police Service of Northern Ireland will be responsible for all policing in the province.

What are your thoughts and memories as Operation Banner comes to a close? How has its legacy affected Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK? What does the future hold for the province?

Click here to read the main story (on the BBC website)
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Eskamo
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#2
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Can't see a United Ireland happening for quite a long time yet. Sinn Fein loses decision making power and gains only in relation to its principles.

Politicians forsaking power to pursue ideological objectives? Worked great for Gorbachev.
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-Kav-
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#3
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#3
Operation Banner is officially over now, but in reality it's been doing very little for a fair while now. As far as I can see, the future doesn't hold anything radically different to the present, the army shipping off home isn't going to change much. That said, watching a Sinn Fein councillor openly praising the work of the PSNI in her area the other day was very strange (and welcome) indeed.
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SuperhansFavouriteAlsatian
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#4
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#4
What's next to for Northern Ireland?

WEDNESDAY!
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40550
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#5
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#5
I don't think the army pulling out will change anything, but I think its symbolic of how far things have come. Time will soften everybodys approach
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Dionysus
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#6
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#6
The chances of this actually being the end are not high. After about 400 years of conflict, it seems unlikely that this will herald true reconciliation.
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Xx Tomásíona - Mháire xX
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#7
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They'll be back, probably in a different area. But they'll never be gone forever.
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technik
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#8
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the big stick is just a few hours on the boat away. and what a mighty fine well used and extensive stick.

its all fakery these days. look at the state of ian and marty gushing at each other as if anyone apart from lovey dovey liberal clowns actually thinks any part of it is even remotely real.

all's calm on each side of the walls these days. the same walls that have been there for hundreds of years and always will be. its a bit like pre 1969 in a way but that will change again someday as it's almost part of the DNA of people here to be at war with each other.
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Jim-ie
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#9
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The British Army has been dismantling bases for a few years now, especially around the border and south armagh. This is only formality. I havent seen a British soldier crouching at my gate since I was about 13 I think. Glad to see the back of them. Theres still 5000 soldiers still around which is considerable for a population of a million and a half but its better than having 30,000.

I read a huge (and I mean huge) section of the Newsletter today dedicated to the history of the operation. Nothing that I didn't know but it was interesting all the same. I dont reckon its like pre-1969 at all, the troubles were never about a united ireland at first and civil rights has been achieved, and there is no reason for the provos to reform, the uvf are winding up (they were the first lot to spring up), and we just need to wait on the UDA which are taking their time. The RIRA lost its support after Omagh and the CIRA never had any support, the only real republican group left is the INLA and they've the manpower of a corner shop. Stormont is a coalition of parties and the PSNI have been reformed (still not enough in my opinion though).

The place is still as divided as ever though on a ground level, that will take years.
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technik
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#10
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(Original post by Jim-ie)
The place is still as divided as ever though on a ground level, that will take years.
don't see it myself.

the final war to end it has yet to occur in my opinion
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SuperhansFavouriteAlsatian
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#11
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Well there's never going to be no troops in the NI, for the same reason that there's never going to be no troops in London, or no troops in Yorkshire - it's still a part of the same country as the army with which is was "occupied" by.
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Jim-ie
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#12
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There wasnt troops before this operation as far as I know. I'm not expecting them to move out completely though and I'm content with 5000 in the end.

technik, what do you mean you do not see it? They're still building peace walls in some places I think. Maybe that war wont end anytime soon.

am getting a bit concerned with browns ideas on border controls though. i dont want any border controls with the south, its going to be a pain in the arse for those of us who go to dublin regularly. ugh.
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technik
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#13
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(Original post by Jim-ie)
There wasnt troops before this operation as far as I know. I'm not expecting them to move out completely though and I'm content with 5000 in the end.

technik, what do you mean you do not see it? They're still building peace walls in some places I think. The good thing is there are loads more cross community projects in schools and there are ideas floating around about integrated schools but the churches arent too happy about that apparently. Maybe the war on secterianism will never end.
i mean i dont see it taking years as u mentioned at the end of your post. i mean i don't see it occuring to any conclusion ever.
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Jim-ie
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#14
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Thats probably the unfortunate reality.
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Xx Tomásíona - Mháire xX
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#15
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They left 16 minutes ago :party:

whoops....nationalist in me came out
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Xx Tomásíona - Mháire xX
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#16
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#16
At least no other children have to stand out in the rain in their jammies when their parents cars were getting searched.

Only real memory I have of the army. But like who makes a 4 year old stand in the rain after midnight?
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Jim-ie
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#17
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True that. Might be cumman na mban in disguise you know!

I've a fair few memories of the army but I was a bit older than 4, maybe around 7 or 8 when they showed up at the house. And i remember hearing a gun battle that wasnt too far away from where i lived, was probably about 10.

Looking back, most people have a fair few stories, like the time my da tripped over 'ra sniper in pitch black (they turned the street lights out) when he went to the shop to get milk before it closed. All he heard was a "urg".

maybe we should turn this into a 'stories from the troubles' apparently the bbc are making a documentary about funny or odd stories from that period, a mate of mines da was interviewed a few months ago for it.
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Xx Tomásíona - Mháire xX
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#18
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(Original post by Jim-ie)
True that. Might be cumman na mban in disguise you know!

I've a fair few memories of the army but I was a bit older than 4, maybe around 7 or 8 when they showed up at the house. And i remember hearing a gun battle that wasnt too far away from where i lived, was probably about 10.

Looking back, most people have a fair few stories, like the time my da tripped over 'ra sniper in pitch black (they turned the street lights out) when he went to the shop to get milk before it closed. All he heard was a "urg".
Oh aye, Cumman na mban at the age of 4 :rolleyes: What'll them Catholics think of next

I've heard even better ones of when people were coming home they'd get stopped at a checkpoint and made to sit in the puddles for about half an hour or so. Or taken around a corner and come back very worse for wear. Operation "Banner" was more like Operation "Bull****" to me. It just seemed to cause more rows, really.

Maybe, it'd be interesting. Especially the amount of times people would say we were wrong and telling ****e :p:
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Jim-ie
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#19
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Dem bludy kafflicks. seriously like.

Operation bull****, I like that one.

I'ven ever heard any being stopped at checkpoints by the army, have only heard stories of checkpoints by loyalists at tigers bay and the likes but then again I dont live anywhere near the border. Got a fair few stories of the falls curfew.
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Xx Tomásíona - Mháire xX
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#20
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(Original post by Jim-ie)
Dem bludy kafflicks.

Operation bull****, I like that one. Operation *******s, could go on all day with those.
We could, but we have to remember to be PC, especially around here :p: :hahaha:
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