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Anyone know if LJMU is a good university to get a good job in? Watch

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    Will be attending in a week and worried I won't get a good job? Doing business management
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    I've heard very god things about that university, no negatives, either. I didn't study there so I can't give data or examples but from what I have read employment rates are good!

    The most important thing to consider, is the quality of the students who are applying to the jobs. A lot of the time, someone from Newcastle is more likely to get the job over someone form LJMU simply because they have a better aptitude for academic pursuits and can be more assertive. Your typical UCL student stands a better chance of getting a job over the typical LJMU student, because the UCL student is likely to have done so much more during their time and has done more to stand out. It isn't always about the name of your university holding you back, sure having a good university on your CV is helpful, but better universities attract brighter and more successful students, so don't be surprised if they get the jobs first.

    Focus on improving yourself, rather than worrying on your university's place in the rankings. Being outgoing, confident, assertive, and charming will take you a lot further than the name of your university. Think of the quiet bookworm doing business management at Durham, vs the social, friendly people person doing business management at LJMU, who do you think would do better managing a team or organising a project? I'd put money on the one with the personality. Conversely, if you compete against someone from a better uni who is also bright and articulate, confident and assertive then of course going to a top 25 uni is better than not having gone to one.

    Hope that helps.
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    My brother is thinking of doing business management at LJMU by the way, he visited a few weeks ago and loved it.
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    Make sure you try to get a 1st or a 2.1 overall.

    Also try to achieve over 60% in your first year so you can get a internship/summer work placement in your 2nd year.

    If possible, partake in a work placement year in your third year.

    Join clubs, relevant societies, volunteer, get as much work experience as you can and you'll be fine.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by geolowiser)
    I've heard very god things about that university, no negatives, either. I didn't study there so I can't give data or examples but from what I have read employment rates are good!

    The most important thing to consider, is the quality of the students who are applying to the jobs. A lot of the time, someone from Newcastle is more likely to get the job over someone form LJMU simply because they have a better aptitude for academic pursuits and can be more assertive. Your typical UCL student stands a better chance of getting a job over the typical LJMU student, because the UCL student is likely to have done so much more during their time and has done more to stand out. It isn't always about the name of your university holding you back, sure having a good university on your CV is helpful, but better universities attract brighter and more successful students, so don't be surprised if they get the jobs first.

    Focus on improving yourself, rather than worrying on your university's place in the rankings. Being outgoing, confident, assertive, and charming will take you a lot further than the name of your university. Think of the quiet bookworm doing business management at Durham, vs the social, friendly people person doing business management at LJMU, who do you think would do better managing a team or organising a project? I'd put money on the one with the personality. Conversely, if you compete against someone from a better uni who is also bright and articulate, confident and assertive then of course going to a top 25 uni is better than not having gone to one.

    Hope that helps.
    Great! Going back to Northern Ireland after I graduate so hope I'll be ok. Great hope
    I can meet him! Would you say LJMU is a good uni then?
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    (Original post by Analyst89)
    Make sure you try to get a 1st or a 2.1 overall.

    Also try to achieve over 60% in your first year so you can get a internship/summer work placement in your 2nd year.

    If possible, partake in a work placement year in your third year.

    Join clubs, relevant societies, volunteer, get as much work experience as you can and you'll be fine.

    Good luck!
    Yeah aiming for a first! And have work placement in my third year!
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    It's what you make of it. I was a journalist for more than 20 years and the most succesful person I worked with closely - he went on to be a very senior executive at a major news broadcaster - studied at LJMU.
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    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    It's what you make of it. I was a journalist for more than 20 years and the most succesful person I worked with closely - he went on to be a very senior executive at a major news broadcaster - studied at LJMU.
    So it's more about what you do and what you get rather than where you get it from?
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    (Original post by Georgelizmera)
    So it's more about what you do and what you get rather than where you get it from?
    Life is rarely so simple that success or failure can be ascribed to a single factor. He succeeded because of his ability, plus a little good fortune at the start if his career. People can succeed wherever they go to uni, but it might be more difficult from some situations.
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    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    Life is rarely so simple that success or failure can be ascribed to a single factor. He succeeded because of his ability, plus a little good fortune at the start if his career. People can succeed wherever they go to uni, but it might be more difficult from some situations.
    Would you say it's a good uni though?
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    (Original post by Georgelizmera)
    Would you say it's a good uni though?
    How long is a piece of string?
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    (Original post by Georgelizmera)
    Would you say it's a good uni though?
    George,

    It's a mid-tier university which does very well in some departments (ranked 11th in the UK for hospitality and leisure) and not so well in others (90th in one department).

    Graduate prospects (% in jobs or further study after 6 months) are on the lower side at 63% for 2015, but that could be because Liverpool isn't a very large city and a lot of people would be vying for jobs elsewhere, such as Manchester, which has three universities with better industry links to companies in Manchester. Also, something to consider is that a lot of the graduate prospects for other subjects are much higher because of students going onto further study, which isn't something that happens with business courses (I am excluding economics and finance from this as that's a whole different animal) and even if people choose to do an MBA that doesn't usually come until they have some experience in business. Usually 40-50% of first year students are postgraduate so that should give you some idea of how many people go into further study, which can explain why graduate prospects are so much lower.

    You should re-read the post I made earlier, being that the university doesn't get you the job in most circumstances, you do. Some universities are better at pushing their students to enter debates, competitions, come up with new ideas etc, this is why their students are more employable. If you go to a low-tier uni vs an upper echelon university such as St Andrews you won't be pushed as much to do those things, nor will the student body be able to handle it on top of their workload simply because they are less capable (which is why they didn't get in to St Andrews). It's a tough love answer, but if you follow suit and really throw yourself in, join the debating society, critical thinking society, whatever you think will challenge yourself to be a better candidate, then you will stand a much better change at getting a good job at the end of it as you will stand out so much more.

    FYI I went to Plymouth for my undergrad, also a mid-tier university and there were people on my course who were brilliant and got fantastic jobs because they were proactive, bright, and really went for it, and others who just coasted and did the bare minimum and complained that they didn't have a job at the end of it. It's about what you make of it, not its position in the rankings.
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    (Original post by geolowiser)
    George,

    It's a mid-tier university which does very well in some departments (ranked 11th in the UK for hospitality and leisure) and not so well in others (90th in one department).

    Graduate prospects (% in jobs or further study after 6 months) are on the lower side at 63% for 2015, but that could be because Liverpool isn't a very large city and a lot of people would be vying for jobs elsewhere, such as Manchester, which has three universities with better industry links to companies in Manchester. Also, something to consider is that a lot of the graduate prospects for other subjects are much higher because of students going onto further study, which isn't something that happens with business courses (I am excluding economics and finance from this as that's a whole different animal) and even if people choose to do an MBA that doesn't usually come until they have some experience in business. Usually 40-50% of first year students are postgraduate so that should give you some idea of how many people go into further study, which can explain why graduate prospects are so much lower.

    You should re-read the post I made earlier, being that the university doesn't get you the job in most circumstances, you do. Some universities are better at pushing their students to enter debates, competitions, come up with new ideas etc, this is why their students are more employable. If you go to a low-tier uni vs an upper echelon university such as St Andrews you won't be pushed as much to do those things, nor will the student body be able to handle it on top of their workload simply because they are less capable (which is why they didn't get in to St Andrews). It's a tough love answer, but if you follow suit and really throw yourself in, join the debating society, critical thinking society, whatever you think will challenge yourself to be a better candidate, then you will stand a much better change at getting a good job at the end of it as you will stand out so much more.

    FYI I went to Plymouth for my undergrad, also a mid-tier university and there were people on my course who were brilliant and got fantastic jobs because they were proactive, bright, and really went for it, and others who just coasted and did the bare minimum and complained that they didn't have a job at the end of it. It's about what you make of it, not its position in the rankings.
    P.S. As I said I studied at Plymouth, and for the last three and a half years having been working as a wellsite geologist for a large oil and gas exploration company. I got the job because my lecturers pushed me into certain situations, that led to contacts and discussions over drinks and then shortly after finishing my exams I was in the Canadian high-arctic doing research for a charity. It's that work that got me the job, and it was my lecturers who showed me the path to the right people to speak to. The name of my uni certainly didn't hold me back, but it definitely didn't help.
 
 
 
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