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court case - need some law advice - lawers and cops needed!!! watch

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    (Original post by sniper999)
    i am tryin to listen to all the views, im tryin to evaluate it all in my head, and see whats the best thing to do.
    You're not making that very apparent.

    (Original post by sniper999)
    and as for where and when, well can the public come and watch???
    Yep, as many people as can fit on the seats are allowed. Normally it's bored old ladies with their knitting. But I would really quite like to watch this one.
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    (Original post by sniper999)
    wats the difference between magistrates and the jury courts??
    All crimes go before the magistrate at first. If it's too serious for them to deal with, it'll go to (I think) the Crown Court, where the accused gets a trial by jury.
    if it's less serious, the magistrates have the authority to deal with it. They hear the evidence, give the verdict and pass the sentence.
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    (Original post by Hayley...)
    You're not making that very apparent.
    lol. He'll probably be joyriding on the streets with his yob mates in a few minutes - then come on here complaining about another potential conviction.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    lol. He'll probably be joyriding on the streets with his yob mates in a few minutes - then come on here complaining about another potential conviction.
    Hmm. I'm getting bored now. He's taking the piss, obviously.
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    I find it ridiculous that the Home Office is planning to impose an £80 arbritrary fine for shoplifters, and yet fools like this end up going to court - for an even more petty offence.

    If somebody wants to ride around without a helmet, ignoring the accepted wisdom, and putting their life at risk - let them*. Why swallow up taxpayers' money and commit stretched legal resources to such unnecessary bureaucracy?

    *Just make sure that an appropriate invoice is sent to their next-of-kin, to pay for cleaning up the mess on the street.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    I
    If somebody wants to ride around without a helmet, ignoring the accepted wisdom, and putting their life at risk - let them. Why swallow up taxpayers' money and commit stretched legal resources to such unnecessary bureaucracy?
    I agree, in fact such a policy will result in the eventual extinction of those who behave so stupidly.

    I think that anything that does not effect other people should not be a crime.
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    (Original post by Hayley...)
    But there is no way that you'll be cleared of the crime. So that means you will be punished, most likely with a fine.

    The only option is damage limitation. Just say sorry and you'll get a small fine.

    Try and rant about the crap you've mentioned in this thread and you'll get a big fine. It's quite simple.
    will this be in my criminal record?
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    (Original post by sniper999)
    will this be in my criminal record?
    Yes.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    I find it ridiculous that the Home Office is planning to impose an £80 arbritrary fine for shoplifters, and yet fools like this end up going to court - for an even more petty offence.

    If somebody wants to ride around without a helmet, ignoring the accepted wisdom, and putting their life at risk - let them*. Why swallow up taxpayers' money and commit stretched legal resources to such unnecessary bureaucracy?

    *Just make sure that an appropriate invoice is sent to their next-of-kin, to pay for cleaning up the mess on the street.
    sometimes i think, are you chating from your ars, i mean things that you say dont even make any sense, i.e. '*Just make sure that an appropriate invoice is sent to their next-of-kin, to pay for cleaning up the mess on the street' do you call that justice!!!
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    (Original post by Hayley...)
    Yes.
    dnt say that, you serious, **** i didnt no it was that serious, how long will it be there for do you no?
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    (Original post by sniper999)
    sometimes i think, are you chating from your ars, i mean things that you say dont even make any sense, i.e. '*Just make sure that an appropriate invoice is sent to their next-of-kin, to pay for cleaning up the mess on the street' do you call that justice!!!
    He's saying that anyone who's stupid enough to ride on a scooter without a helmet should face the consequences.
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    (Original post by sniper999)
    dnt say that, you serious, **** i didnt no it was that serious, how long will it be there for do you no?
    I'm being serious. It'd be a criminal conviction, so it's permannt, I think.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    I agree, in fact such a policy will result in the eventual extinction of those who behave so stupidly.

    I think that anything that does not effect other people should not be a crime.
    I can almost understand the logic of an ambulanceman who, seeing an intoxicated acquaintance of mine in the street, proceeded to drive on. It costs the NHS £600 to deal with your average drunk. Countless ambulances journey back-and-forth through the nation's urban centres every evening. Are they taking heart-attack victims to hospital? Most unlikely.

    Self-inflicted injury and crimes (which put only the offender at risk) is one of the biggest wastes of public funds in existence.
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    (Original post by Hayley...)
    I'm being serious. It'd be a criminal conviction, so it's permannt, I think.
    it cant be, i mean thats not major enough to be perm, i thought at most 2 yrs, im sure you egg a bit too much there lady
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    (Original post by sniper999)
    it cant be, i mean thats not major enough to be perm, i thought at most 2 yrs, im sure you egg a bit too much there lady
    I don't think the severity of the crime is what determines the length on record, I think it's how it's recorded. Warnings are not recorded, cautions are recorded for a certain amount of time and criminal convictions are with you for life. Might be wrong though.
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    (Original post by Hayley...)
    I don't think the severity of the crime is what determines the length on record, I think it's how it's recorded. Warnings are not recorded, cautions are recorded for a certain amount of time and criminal convictions are with you for life. Might be wrong though.
    gives a sign of relief ( reading the latter)
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    (Original post by Hayley...)
    I don't think the severity of the crime is what determines the length on record, I think it's how it's recorded. Warnings are not recorded, cautions are recorded for a certain amount of time and criminal convictions are with you for life. Might be wrong though.
    The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act, 197?, states that certain convictions can become 'spent' i.e. they do not need to be mentioned on employment forms etc. But they will always remain on the police computer. This is so that offenders are not unduly disadvantaged when it comes to getting a job.
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    (Original post by sniper999)
    gives a sign of relief ( reading the latter)
    I could equally be right though.

    EDIT: Well, semi-right will do me.
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    (Original post by calumc)
    I don't mean to hijack this thread, but I also have a problem, but hopefully this one will be easier-

    I was a passenger in a car accident a few months ago. A week or so I got a letter from the drivers solicitor, asking for a copy of my statement and so on. The problem is that the date of the trial (to take place in Inverness in October) is two weeks into my first term of university, when all going well I'll be in Oxford. This would mean a 3-day round trip of 600-odd miles each way and is time I really can't afford to miss. I tried the local police station, but all they said was that if I was called and didn't turn up then they could arrest me, which is useless. Where do I stand?
    I understand that Scotland has a different legal system to us. From what I've read, and I state that I am no lawyer, that it seems you would have to travel back to Scotland.


    Mod Expression - Language

    Has a warrant been issued for you? If so was it in Scotland?

    What are they wanting you for the trial as such as a witness? j/w

    Is this a criminal case or a civil case?
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    (Original post by dave134)
    You mentioned that you were the passenger. Am I correct in assuming that you are only a witness, not a defendant yourself?

    If you have to go then yes, you have to go. Contempt of Court is a serious offence, and Oxford have the following rule in place

    As has been stated Contempt of Court can result in a custodial sentence, and so the Proctors would most likely seek your expulsion from the university.

    Speak to your college. If you are indeed only a witness then they have to treat things sympathetically, as you are not at fault. I believe that your expenses will be covered as well. Annoying it may be, but you would jeapordise far more by not showing up.
    I'm just a witness, yes. I don't know whether I'll be called as one in October as I havn't heard anything from the court, a letter from the defendant's solicitor is the first I've heard of anything, but as things stand it's going to be a problem if I am.
 
 
 
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