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Can I do well at A-Level with a B in GCSE? Success Stories? Watch

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    You'd say the odds were against you but tbh as long as you work hard you can get any grade you want really

    This is for maths but I guess it still applies. At my school you needed an A at GCSE to do the A-Level, but there were two people who got a B and were allowed to do it still because the teachers knew their ability and decided that they just didn't do that well in those particular exams.
    One of them ended up getting a U at AS and could no longer continue the course, the other one went on to get an A at A2

    So really it isn't about how well you did at GCSE, it's just about how much effort you put in over the next 2 years.
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    (Original post by jordanshelley97)
    You'd say the odds were against you but tbh as long as you work hard you can get any grade you want really

    This is for maths but I guess it still applies. At my school you needed an A at GCSE to do the A-Level, but there were two people who got a B and were allowed to do it still because the teachers knew their ability and decided that they just didn't do that well in those particular exams.
    One of them ended up getting a U at AS and could no longer continue the course, the other one went on to get an A at A2
    same requirement at my school too.

    So the student who failed, did he revise at all? And the student who passed, how much work did he do?
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    My friend got a C in English Literature GCSE, but went on to get an A at A-Level. Anything is possible when you put your mind to it, don't listen to your teachers who tell you that "you should have a B or an A at GCSE to do a subject at A-Level". As long as you are willing to put a lot of hard work into a subject, you'll be able to achieve anything.
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    I got a couple of A*s, As, and Bs in GCSE. I got BBCC in my AS level (that's the first year). A lot of people might call that successful results- however, I, although I am quite happy with those results, they're not a success to me. I was aiming for As, but my foot was not on the ground. I didn't put enough effort in. I didn't understand why I was studying painfully. I didn't like school very much and was ill a lot of times.

    But I have changed.

    The basics MUST be covered first. Get your diet (what you eat, in moderation) in control. Get your sleeping patterns in control. Get your ambitions in focus and stay one step ahead by staying on schedule, writing key events down, listening to your teachers and learning advisers. Once that's done...

    Now onto the bigger stuff... Understand HOW TO STUDY - because absolutely NO ONE is going to teach you how to study, and even if they do, it all boils down to whether you learn it or not - they can't make you learn it. So understand that taking breaks is necessary, work at a comfortable amount of time per session (e.g. pomodoro technique). Make sure you have everything you need (stationary, cards, paper, A3 paper, printer, files for organisation). Now understand what spaced repetition is, and what associations and linking knowledge is, why studying at the same-ish time most days is important. Download all the powerpoints you can get for each module (and/or ask your teacher for them). Make note/bookmark/download relevant videos, past papers, mark schemes, reports, specification (all of which you can find online on the exam board sites).

    The important thing is to understand why you're studying. Don't you want to learn maths (for example) so that it can help you one day or in your career - rather than studying because your parents told you to? Do you want to go to a good university, not just because it's university, but because you can learn something there?

    In essence, mostly everyone can do well if they put the time and effort in. I know a lot of people may say that to you, but it's the truth. Also, I don't like the word "Study", so I use Learning from now on.
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    (Original post by Kiritsugu)
    I got a couple of A*s, As, and Bs in GCSE. I got BBCC in my AS level (that's the first year). A lot of people might call that successful results- however, I, although I am quite happy with those results, they're not a success to me. I was aiming for As, but my foot was not on the ground. I didn't put enough effort in. I didn't understand why I was studying painfully. I didn't like school very much and was ill a lot of times.

    But I have changed.

    The basics MUST be covered first. Get your diet (what you eat, in moderation) in control. Get your sleeping patterns in control. Get your ambitions in focus and stay one step ahead by staying on schedule, writing key events down, listening to your teachers and learning advisers. Once that's done...

    Now onto the bigger stuff... Understand HOW TO STUDY - because absolutely NO ONE is going to teach you how to study, and even if they do, it all boils down to whether you learn it or not - they can't make you learn it. So understand that taking breaks is necessary, work at a comfortable amount of time per session (e.g. pomodoro technique). Make sure you have everything you need (stationary, cards, paper, A3 paper, printer, files for organisation). Now understand what spaced repetition is, and what associations and linking knowledge is, why studying at the same-ish time most days is important. Download all the powerpoints you can get for each module (and/or ask your teacher for them). Make note/bookmark/download relevant videos, past papers, mark schemes, reports, specification (all of which you can find online on the exam board sites).

    The important thing is to understand why you're studying. Don't you want to learn maths (for example) so that it can help you one day or in your career - rather than studying because your parents told you to? Do you want to go to a good university, not just because it's university, but because you can learn something there?

    In essence, mostly everyone can do well if they put the time and effort in. I know a lot of people may say that to you, but it's the truth. Also, I don't like the word "Study", so I use Learning from now on.
    Oh yeah, and keep REVIEWING your work. Looking back at old flash cards is a form of reviewing. Simply examining your notes and/or making them better is a form of reviewing. Keep reviewing.
 
 
 
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