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Ethics: How Do You Explain Lying To A Child? Watch

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    See title.

    To me, a lie seems to be something that has a circular definition but is commonly understood - so how can we convert that common understanding into a simple explanation (to a child)?
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    (Original post by lawyer3c)
    See title.

    To me, a lie seems to be something that has a circular definition but is commonly understood - so how can we convert that common understanding into a simple explanation (to a child)?
    A lie is something that somebody says is true when they believe it isn't.
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    You don't need to explain lying to a child - they learn it in the toddler phase ^.^
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    (Original post by lawyer3c)
    See title.

    To me, a lie seems to be something that has a circular definition but is commonly understood - so how can we convert that common understanding into a simple explanation (to a child)?
    IMO If you are lying in order to protect the child or keep his innocence I don't think there is an explanation required.

    But, if you were to explain lying to a child literally I would say...
    "Lying is when you tell a lie. A lie is when you do not tell the truth. Lying is something we should all avoid as it is wrong to tell people lies. However, sometimes we have to lie if the lie you tell will protect them or the truth will harm or hurt them."

    Kolia
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    (Original post by lawyer3c)
    See title.

    To me, a lie seems to be something that has a circular definition but is commonly understood - so how can we convert that common understanding into a simple explanation (to a child)?
    "Lying is saying something to somebody that you know isn't true". That's what you need to say and any complexities they will pick up from context. A lot of how children learn is actually through context, not direct teaching. Were you ever specifically told what talking is? Probably not. That's context learning.
    Children may not get the whole deffinition at first- jokes and lies is a commen point of confusion because jokes aren't true (there is no interupting cow)- but they will learn it through what other people do and say. You can also explain any specific questions a child has as they ask them.
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    If you mean lying to them for their own good... They don't need to know because they can't really understand and it will probably just frighten them or make them grow up too fast. When they're ready/mature enough they'll either work the thing out themselves or someone will explain it to them. But for the time being don't worry about it go have fun and enjoy being a kid.

    If you're talking about 'bad' or harmful lies then you explain that someone keeps a secret for bad reasons i.e. That the secret might hurt someone or that the person might want something but other people might suffer as a result of them not telling the truth.

    White lies... Explain that it isn't always a good idea to tell the complete truth if it's not a really important thing and nobody will be hurt by keeping the lie but actually some good might come of it like someone feeling a bit better about themselves. For example if you don't really like someone's clothes but they are very happy with them it's okay to say they're nice clothes.
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    A lie is the conveyance of a statement that one knows to be untrue. I haven't wittingly done so as an adult. Very important ethic
 
 
 
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