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    I always had this spark and a passion for children, hence i wanted(still contemplating) to be a child nurse.

    I believe i have this nursing quality in me to become one.

    However, since the NHS will no longer be paying students for their nursing degree as of 2016 onwards(when i will be applying), i see this as a drawback.

    Also, the maths and English test and the interviews. Why do we have to take these test, i already have my GCSE's that prove my capabilities if not more. As for the interview(if i ever get one), God knows if i will even get through that.

    Nursing is the only degree i have considered studying because( a) my passion for kids (b) no tuition fees (c) my interest in healthcare (d) job prospects.


    I don't want to take out a student loan and then be in debt, for what reason?

    If it was 10 years ago, i would not need a nursing degree to be a child nurse.

    I guess, i am just looking for reasonable advice.
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    If it's your passion then go for it. You will need a loan for any other course as well won't you? The other option is to take some time off, work and save a bit and get a bit of experience and then decide.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    I always had this spark and a passion for children, hence i wanted(still contemplating) to be a child nurse.

    I believe i have this nursing quality in me to become one.

    However, since the NHS will no longer be paying students for their nursing degree as of 2016 onwards(when i will be applying), i see this as a drawback.

    Nursing is the only degree i have considered studying because( a) my passion for kids (b) no tuition fees (c) my interest in healthcare (d) job prospects.


    I don't want to take out a student loan and then be in debt, for what reason?

    If it was 10 years ago, i would not need a nursing degree to be a child nurse.

    I guess, i am just looking for reasonable advice.
    try to become a childminder first, then finish Early years course and start your own nursery as alternative....
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    I always had this spark and a passion for children, hence i wanted(still contemplating) to be a child nurse.

    I believe i have this nursing quality in me to become one.

    However, since the NHS will no longer be paying students for their nursing degree as of 2016 onwards(when i will be applying), i see this as a drawback.

    Nursing is the only degree i have considered studying because( a) my passion for kids (b) no tuition fees (c) my interest in healthcare (d) job prospects.


    I don't want to take out a student loan and then be in debt, for what reason?

    If it was 10 years ago, i would not need a nursing degree to be a child nurse.

    I guess, i am just looking for reasonable advice.
    You might have debts but you will have a job for life.
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    I say, if nursing is something you want to do then do it- don't focus on the money side of it too much after all there are so many of us that are not getting paid to do our degrees- so you'll just be like us anyway. Remember, if there is a will, there is a way. Good luck
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    For the reason of becoming a nurse? You weren't considering it just because it was funded by the NHS but for all the other reasons you said.

    Student loans are little more than an additional tax you pay. You never see the money that you pay back, so you never miss it. I'm never going to pay off my student loan from a few years ago or the maintenance one I've taken out now to do SLT. It's not something I even think about. It's not something that stopped me getting a mortgage or taking out other loans. It doesn't affect my credit rating and no one has ever contacted me about it once. The public conversation about student loans does not match the reality. *
    *
    If you really won't study to become a nurse just because of that then you probably don't want to do it that much anyway. Nothing would stop me doing the job I wanted to do. Any job worth doing involves an investment, be it of time or money (or both) and a few other sacrifices that are sometimes involved. I realised that when I applied to do SLT. *If I hadn't got in when I did and was reapplying now I would take out the fees loan and suck it up. It would be no different than any other job I wanted to do at that level.*

    Don't moan about not needing a degree if you were doing it ten years ago. You do now and that's because the job requires graduate level skills and knowledge. You can't turn back the clock. It's a waste of energy to think about it.*
    *
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    It does suck that the free money has been taken away, but only because you know about it. With NHS Funding for SLT this year entry (decided not to go for it), I would have been in receipt of around £5500 non-repayable living loans each year.**

    That's great and everything, but I have no other source of income, and with any healthcare course it can be really difficult to fit in time to work - I can't live off £5500.*

    With my background, by taking out SFE I would be in receipt of £8200 per year. That is almost 50% more, that makes things actually manageable.*

    Yes you will have debt, but I will refer you to the excellent points made by other posters here.

    If it is your passion and you can't imagine doing anything else then just do it. You will have a job for life, good career progression if you work hard for it. An advanced nurse practitioner/matron earns anything in the region of £50,000-£80,000*
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    I wouldn't consider needing a degree as a setback. Remember that you'll receive new knowledge and skills that you will benefit from. Skills that help you to be a great nurse, but knowledge will also help you to grow as a person and it is likely to widen your world. Just remember to have the courage to chase your dreams, best of luck!
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    I always had this spark and a passion for children, hence i wanted(still contemplating) to be a child nurse.

    I believe i have this nursing quality in me to become one.

    However, since the NHS will no longer be paying students for their nursing degree as of 2016 onwards(when i will be applying), i see this as a drawback.

    Nursing is the only degree i have considered studying because( a) my passion for kids (b) no tuition fees (c) my interest in healthcare (d) job prospects.


    I don't want to take out a student loan and then be in debt, for what reason?

    If it was 10 years ago, i would not need a nursing degree to be a child nurse.

    I guess, i am just looking for reasonable advice.
    If you are at all in any doubt about nursing then you need to think so, so carefully about it. It's not one of those careers you can do as an after-though or a second option. You need to be 100% sure that nursing is for you, and 100% committed to the course.

    If you're not it will likely show in your application, and if you do make it to the course you would struggle for motivation. The things nursing students see and endure in practice are not for the faint hearted and often it is the raw motivation of wanting to become a nurse that keeps many on the course after difficult experiences in practice.

    Please think carefully - research more if you have to. Wait a year to think if you have to, but its important you make the right decision, not only for you, but also so the kimited nursing course spaces are left for those who really want them.
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    (Original post by just ok)
    try to become a childminder first, then finish Early years course and start your own nursery as alternative....

    I have worked with children before and have considered being a nursery manager but working in a nursery is not ideal anymore for me.
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    If you are at all in any doubt about nursing then you need to think so, so carefully about it. It's not one of those careers you can do as an after-though or a second option. You need to be 100% sure that nursing is for you, and 100% committed to the course.

    If you're not it will likely show in your application, and if you do make it to the course you would struggle for motivation. The things nursing students see and endure in practice are not for the faint hearted and often it is the raw motivation of wanting to become a nurse that keeps many on the course after difficult experiences in practice.

    Please think carefully - research more if you have to. Wait a year to think if you have to, but its important you make the right decision, not only for you, but also so the kimited nursing course spaces are left for those who really want them.
    Yes, you are right
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    Firstly the debt isn't a debt like you get for credit card or loan company, so that's nothing really to worry about. The government would never call the bailiffs or involve the courts.

    Have you thought about perhaps becoming a health care assistant or looking into apprenticeship vacancies?


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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    I always had this spark and a passion for children, hence i wanted(still contemplating) to be a child nurse.

    I believe i have this nursing quality in me to become one.

    However, since the NHS will no longer be paying students for their nursing degree as of 2016 onwards(when i will be applying), i see this as a drawback.

    Also, the maths and English test and the interviews. Why do we have to take these test, i already have my GCSE's that prove my capabilities if not more. As for the interview(if i ever get one), God knows if i will even get through that.

    Nursing is the only degree i have considered studying because( a) my passion for kids (b) no tuition fees (c) my interest in healthcare (d) job prospects.


    I don't want to take out a student loan and then be in debt, for what reason?

    If it was 10 years ago, i would not need a nursing degree to be a child nurse.

    I guess, i am just looking for reasonable advice.
    Listen, why do you worry about all these interview and tests? I am not English, I never learnt English language at school as an object before, but I did my GCSEs (English+Maths) + Access course in one 2015/2016 year, passed all tests and interview and received my conditional offer for Nursing at Edge Hill. If I could you can everything! You just need to choose what you want, I'd recommend you to try volunteering in different areas to understand what you like most
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    (Original post by just ok)
    Listen, why do you worry about all these interview and tests? I am not English, I never learnt English language at school as an object before, but I did my GCSEs (English+Maths) + Access course in one 2015/2016 year, passed all tests and interview and received my conditional offer for Nursing at Edge Hill. If I could you can everything! You just need to chose what you want, I'd recommend you to try volunteering in different areas to understand what you like most
    Cool.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Yes, you are right
    My pleasure. Pleased to be able to help
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    How about a different branch of nursing?


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    To be honest if you're feeling like this you maybe shouldn't do it.
    Nursing is not easy and you need that passion and that want to do it.
    Funding, although important, isn't going to stop people who are that passionate about the course.
    Similarly with the interviews. They're there to sift out the people who don't meet the requirements to be a nurse. Same as the maths and English. They're an important part of nursing and nurses have more responsibilities than they ever have done previously.
    You need to realise these things are in place for a reason. Same as the finance. Although I disagree with the government in England doing this, you can see their reasoning behind it. And this is something you'll have to do with patients, their families and friends. Why do people make the lifestyle choices they make?
    All of it requires a lot of self awareness and being aware of your patients and their needs. If you can't do this how will you work with children that very often can't or don't verbalise where it hurts etc.

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    I agree with deviant182. If you are really passionate about nursing all these things wouldn't even be a problem. You'd just be saying "I have to do this" rather than "why should I have to do this". At the end of the day it's what's required and if you don't think that's fair then look for a different career path. Nursing as a whole isn't fair. The pay isn't fair, the hours aren't fair sometimes, the general treatment of nurses sometimes isn't fair.....would you be willing to put up with that? I don't think you would to be honest. I'm lucky enough to have the bursery but even if I had missed it I still would of applied. Nothing in this lifetime would of stopped me. I didn't get into nursing for the convenience or the fact it's easy to get a job after.....I got into it to help. I majorly struggle with maths and never passed it at school so I re sat it at 23 years old....full of 16-18 year olds. Embarrassing and a really unenjoyable year but I didn't complain when it got to selection process and I had to re sit more tests to prove I was capable. If you like working with kids there's sooooo many other things that you could get into
 
 
 
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