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    im thinking of applying for a psychology course at uni but im more interested in the clinical side of it. i hear that to become a clinical psychologist a phd is required after doing undergraduate degree (as well as work experience), but how easy is it to find a job as a clinical psychologist?
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    I'm no expert on this, so take my guidance with a pinch of salt and do your own further research.

    Almost all 'professional' careers in the field of psych require a doctorate. Psych. has become a hugely popular subject. As a result, the number of graduates completing their bachelor's degrees far exceeds, by a HUGE margin, the number of available positions in the workplace.

    Get as much hands on experience as you can, even if it means intern unpaid work. Make your CV shine. Do what it takes to achieve a 1st, or at least a 2:1 at uni, or you will struggle to find anything. Anything at all.

    Alternatively, book an appointment with a really highly rated career guidance counsellor. Explore what it is that draws you to psych. Explore what other options might be less competitive and just as rewarding. Really think deeply about what career path you want to pursue for the next x number of decades and if psych. is the way to go. There are many professions that require standardised degrees followed by a year on the job mentoring leading to professional examination. Not everyone makes the grade. and can practice. If you are going into a field that has a 75% failure rate, you need to ask yourself seriously, am I better than three out of four of my peers?
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    to my knowledge something like 99% of qualified clin psychs have a job 6 months after graduating, the NHS funds the course so they won't fund places for people who won't get jobs, it's a waste of money so once you're qualified I think finding a job is okay (although obviously sometimes you will struggle to find one if you have a specific location)

    the difficult bit for clinical psychology is getting onto the course, it is 3 years and before you get accepted you normally need at least 2 but the average is more like 4 years of relevant work experience and you need to nail the application/interview as it's extremely competitive
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    Also, given the funding now available for masters, this is likely to become a minimum entry requirement. Its not a short choice, and its not a job which guarantees full time employment either. Without adding in the financial pressures on the nhs system, who are looking to get the most for the least amount of money. I wouldn't be surprised if before we get to application point, funded phd ceases to exist and replaced by loans too.
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    All professional psychologists have a doctoral level qualification (either PhD or professional doctorate). In my graduating class of 250 BSc Psychology students, six have gone on to do their doctorate. There will likely be another four or so that start their doctorate at a later time.

    99% of the people on your psychology degree will want to be a clinical psychologist. Obviously, that isn't going to happen for the vast majority of them. Remember that you're not only competing with them, but every other English-speaking psychology (and some non-psychology) graduate in the world. A woman from Clearing House Leeds (the UCAS of the Clinical Psychology doctorate) came to give a talk at my university and told us that around 35,000 applications are made each year for the 150ish places on the clinical psychology doctorate. It's widely recognised as being one of the most ridiculously competitive careers and by the end of the degree most will have given up on the idea.

    That being said, someone has got to be the successful applicant, and it could very well be you. My advice would be that you:

    a) Do a BPS-accredited psychology degree (does not have to be clinical psychology specifically) with the intention of pursuing a career in clinical psychology.
    b) BUT allow yourself to explore other areas of psychology too. In my experience, the psychology graduates that end up being the most successful are those that allow their interests to change and don't become obsessed with one single idea they had whilst doing their A-Levels. Allow your ideas to change: take note of the non-clinical branches of psychology that you enjoy and you will stand a good chance of ending up with a great career in psychology, even if it's not clinical
 
 
 
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