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    Hi, I'm a student who just started college this week and with that came many questions which I hope can be answered.

    My first question is to do with economics, can I take this to the next level at university without doing A level maths to compliment it?

    My second question is about universities, having some spare time today I decided to search some universities in which I could possibly pursue Economics, that one that stood out to me the most was obviously London School of Economics as I live in Central London and am proficient in the subject (I would like to think). How many subjects do I need to take to even be eligible for this university? (I did go on their website which I found slightly confusing so I was hoping someone could point me in the right direction).

    My GCSE Grades were:

    Spanish A*
    Portuguese A*
    Geography A*
    Business A*

    English Language A
    English Literature A
    Computer Science A

    Maths B
    Statistics B
    RE B
    Core Science B
    Additional Science B

    I hope these can be some form of an indicator bearing in mind I achieved these results with only interventions however I do realise A levels is a whole other level which therefore makes these results somewhat irrelevant but also relevant due to the recent changes of only taking exam after 2 years into the course, I do plan to change my mindset going into A levels.

    My Maths B grade was 1 mark off an A which does not show up or matter whatsoever but is A level maths possible for me (I know with smart work anything is but I mean realistically?).

    The last thing which intrigues me and bothers me was when i searched for the university rankings in the UK the top 3 (Cambridge, Oxford, LSE) all said to average 518-600 points respectively. With a points calculator however; I put in 3 A levels which could not even achieve that all at A* level so do I need to take 4 A-levels to make this happen or do they only choose my best 3?

    Thank you very much for your time and I hope you can answer my questions.
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    (Original post by rafsimons)
    Hi, I'm a student who just started college this week and with that came many questions which I hope can be answered.

    My first question is to do with economics, can I take this to the next level at university without doing A level maths to compliment it?

    My second question is about universities, having some spare time today I decided to search some universities in which I could possibly pursue Economics, that one that stood out to me the most was obviously London School of Economics as I live in Central London and am proficient in the subject (I would like to think). How many subjects do I need to take to even be eligible for this university? (I did go on their website which I found slightly confusing so I was hoping someone could point me in the right direction).

    My GCSE Grades were:

    Spanish A*
    Portuguese A*
    Geography A*
    Business A*

    English Language A
    English Literature A
    Computer Science A

    Maths B
    Statistics B
    RE B
    Core Science B
    Additional Science B

    I hope these can be some form of an indicator bearing in mind I achieved these results with only interventions however I do realise A levels is a whole other level which therefore makes these results somewhat irrelevant but also relevant due to the recent changes of only taking exam after 2 years into the course, I do plan to change my mindset going into A levels.

    My Maths B grade was 1 mark off an A which does not show up or matter whatsoever but is A level maths possible for me (I know with smart work anything is but I mean realistically?).

    The last thing which intrigues me and bothers me was when i searched for the university rankings in the UK the top 3 (Cambridge, Oxford, LSE) all said to average 518-600 points respectively. With a points calculator however; I put in 3 A levels which could not even achieve that all at A* level so do I need to take 4 A-levels to make this happen or do they only choose my best 3?

    Thank you very much for your time and I hope you can answer my questions.
    First off, my experience comes from also applying for Economics Not to be harsh, but with the grades in maths you've achieved it's practically out of the picture. LSE requires further maths for economics, most of the top universities prefer it. All of the good ones require Maths A level. You may be able to get into other universities. If you want to do economics though, Maths A-Level is almost vital. Some colleges let you do this with a B grade- those with a B grade at my college have extra lessons- but you will have to put a lot of effort into it. There are people who go from A* to D, it's a hard subject, but if you're willing to put the work in you'll be okay.
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    (Original post by rafsimons)
    Hi, I'm a student who just started college this week and with that came many questions which I hope can be answered.

    My first question is to do with economics, can I take this to the next level at university without doing A level maths to compliment it?

    My second question is about universities, having some spare time today I decided to search some universities in which I could possibly pursue Economics, that one that stood out to me the most was obviously London School of Economics as I live in Central London and am proficient in the subject (I would like to think). How many subjects do I need to take to even be eligible for this university? (I did go on their website which I found slightly confusing so I was hoping someone could point me in the right direction).

    My GCSE Grades were:

    Spanish A*
    Portuguese A*
    Geography A*
    Business A*

    English Language A
    English Literature A
    Computer Science A

    Maths B
    Statistics B
    RE B
    Core Science B
    Additional Science B

    I hope these can be some form of an indicator bearing in mind I achieved these results with only interventions however I do realise A levels is a whole other level which therefore makes these results somewhat irrelevant but also relevant due to the recent changes of only taking exam after 2 years into the course, I do plan to change my mindset going into A levels.

    My Maths B grade was 1 mark off an A which does not show up or matter whatsoever but is A level maths possible for me (I know with smart work anything is but I mean realistically?).

    The last thing which intrigues me and bothers me was when i searched for the university rankings in the UK the top 3 (Cambridge, Oxford, LSE) all said to average 518-600 points respectively. With a points calculator however; I put in 3 A levels which could not even achieve that all at A* level so do I need to take 4 A-levels to make this happen or do they only choose my best 3?

    Thank you very much for your time and I hope you can answer my questions.
    That would be because UCAS points include AS and A2 levels. Also the value of different grades in UCAS points is changing. However most top 30 universities (especially for a course like economics) won't care about UCAS points, it's just the grades (such as an offer of AAA).

    The only large problem I can see is your maths. Ideally you want to do maths and further maths at A level, but just maths is okay. But you really need to pull it up to an A at AS.
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    (Original post by DeafeningSilence)
    First off, my experience comes from also applying for Economics Not to be harsh, but with the grades in maths you've achieved it's practically out of the picture. LSE requires further maths for economics, most of the top universities prefer it. All of the good ones require Maths A level. You may be able to get into other universities. If you want to do economics though, Maths A-Level is almost vital. Some colleges let you do this with a B grade- those with a B grade at my college have extra lessons- but you will have to put a lot of effort into it. There are people who go from A* to D, it's a hard subject, but if you're willing to put the work in you'll be okay.
    Thank you for your honest and insightful reply, so with the main uni I wanted to go to out of the picture, I can realistically see that I cannot do Further Maths (I'm sure I could with enough work but it will be too much). So maths really is essential then, just how hard would you rank it on a scale you prefer and what do you think I should do in my current situation: I'm taking Geography, Spanish and Economics however I really want to do Economics in university, how much maths does Economics require? What will be the hardest techniques required from me?

    Thank you again for your insightful reply
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    (Original post by richpanda)
    That would be because UCAS points include AS and A2 levels. Also the value of different grades in UCAS points is changing. However most top 30 universities (especially for a course like economics) won't care about UCAS points, it's just the grades (such as an offer of AAA).

    The only large problem I can see is your maths. Ideally you want to do maths and further maths at A level, but just maths is okay. But you really need to pull it up to an A at AS.
    Sorry for my stupidity but the college group I'm in right now (IC6 which is absolutely crap) only lets me do the one exam at the end of 2 years (I believe it's AS? but I could be wrong). Either way, so for most (good) universities they will look at my 3 best or a certain requirement such as A*AA or AAB, will they ever require 4 A levels like: AABB
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    (Original post by rafsimons)
    Thank you for your honest and insightful reply, so with the main uni I wanted to go to out of the picture, I can realistically see that I cannot do Further Maths (I'm sure I could with enough work but it will be too much). So maths really is essential then, just how hard would you rank it on a scale you prefer and what do you think I should do in my current situation: I'm taking Geography, Spanish and Economics however I really want to do Economics in university, how much maths does Economics require? What will be the hardest techniques required from me?

    Thank you again for your insightful reply
    Yeah it's pretty much essential. A-Level economics has required relatively little maths, but I imagine it increases as you get to university. Maths is genuinely what you put into it, and the difficulty will depend on your natural ability. You'll need to be good at algebra- if you've struggled with that, you will have to practice. But that's the good thing about maths- if you practice, you will get better. Make sure you ask questions in lectures, have an example for every technique you one, and just go through questions!
    I love economics and think it's an amazing subject, maths in a way is means to an end, but if you are passionate about it it will be worth it!
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    (Original post by DeafeningSilence)
    Yeah it's pretty much essential. A-Level economics has required relatively little maths, but I imagine it increases as you get to university. Maths is genuinely what you put into it, and the difficulty will depend on your natural ability. You'll need to be good at algebra- if you've struggled with that, you will have to practice. But that's the good thing about maths- if you practice, you will get better. Make sure you ask questions in lectures, have an example for every technique you one, and just go through questions!
    I love economics and think it's an amazing subject, maths in a way is means to an end, but if you are passionate about it it will be worth it!
    I don't love maths but I think that may have been because I had to statistics and then maths with a teacher whom I found the work very hard to understand but once I moved down a set I was starting to like it because I knew what I was doing, if you don't mind me asking are you not at university level yet? And what advice would you give me subject wise - I'm doing economics, spanish, geography, going into this I'm thinking about dropping one maybe. Spanish is easy for me because I'm Portuguese (I didn't drop a mark in all the exams and coursework and GCSE without revision), Geography I got an A* with little to no work and Business was the same. So should I take Maths as an extra subject to make that 4 or maybe drop 1 of these. Are most good economics universites asides from LSE looking for an AAA or something similar with maths and Economics and then a facilitating subject or are they looking for points?

    Thank you once again, you've been of great help!
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    (Original post by rafsimons)
    I don't love maths but I think that may have been because I had to statistics and then maths with a teacher whom I found the work very hard to understand but once I moved down a set I was starting to like it because I knew what I was doing, if you don't mind me asking are you not at university level yet? And what advice would you give me subject wise - I'm doing economics, spanish, geography, going into this I'm thinking about dropping one maybe. Spanish is easy for me because I'm Portuguese (I didn't drop a mark in all the exams and coursework and GCSE without revision), Geography I got an A* with little to no work and Business was the same. So should I take Maths as an extra subject to make that 4 or maybe drop 1 of these. Are most good economics universites asides from LSE looking for an AAA or something similar with maths and Economics and then a facilitating subject or are they looking for points?

    Thank you once again, you've been of great help!
    Sorry for delayed reply! It's amazing how teachers can impact you- as long as you have a positive mindset, which can be a lot easier when you know you have to have it because you have to get on with it! I'm not, no. Applying this year Oxford, Bath, Exeter (:
    I'd be careful with Spanish- if you're a native speakers, there are some unis that I think won't count it as an A Level! It depends on where you want to go- but most good unis will look at subject. I would warn that having business and economics are often considered a narrow choice combination, and again some unis don't accept these as 2 separate A Levels, which will hinder your chances.
 
 
 
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