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    A relative of mine is in hospital at the moment. She has been sectioned.

    When I talk to her, I begin to feel depressed.
    I also have trouble communicating with her during her psychosis because she is irrational and makes little sense.

    Any advice on dealing with her would be appreciated.

    I would prefer to speak to her little and often but am afraid that having short conversations would make her feel like I'm abandoning her a lot.
    If I have long conversations then it takes time for me to recover but then she seems to prefer those.

    If she is ranting, do I ask questions and attempt to get some truth or do I just say yes without understanding. ?
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    (Original post by Kvothe the Arcane)
    A relative of mine is in hospital at the moment. She has been sectioned.

    When I talk to her, I begin to feel depressed.
    I also have trouble communicating with her during her psychosis because she is irrational and makes little sense.

    Any advice on dealing with her would be appreciated.

    I would prefer to speak to her little and often but am afraid that having short conversations would make her feel like I'm abandoning her a lot.
    If I have long conversations then it takes time for me to recover but then she seems to prefer those.

    If she is ranting, do I ask questions and attempt to get some truth or do I just say yes without understanding. ?
    If she has been sectioned you do not need to care for her- she's getting that. Just be there for her. I'm not sure what to do about her ranting- maybe ask the staff what they suggest. I would tend to say keep going as though nothing is wrong as long as there are no risks to health so she feels a bit more "normal", but i'm not sure.
    If you find it difficult talking to her you could try a structured activity like a card game or something so there's less pressure to communicate. You could also write to her so she can remind herself that you care for her even when you aren't there. Postcards could be nice since they'll have a pretty picture too.

    You are very kind to be concerned for her, just remember to take care of yourself too. Mind.org offers supportive advice for friends and family of people with mh problems. Maybe you could check it out.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    If she has been sectioned you do not need to care for her- she's getting that. Just be there for her.
    Hi there, thanks for your reply .

    I'm not sure what to do about her ranting- maybe ask the staff what they suggest.
    Thanks. I'll see what they say. They are reluctant to give me information however as she currently doesn't have capacity to ('tis an annoying mess - consent) but generic advice should be fine, I expect.

    I would tend to say keep going as though nothing is wrong as long as there are no risks to health so she feels a bit more "normal", but i'm not sure.
    Yes, I'm conflicted too. Someone pointed out to me that I might miss a question like "am I going to be here forever?" and so saying yes meaninglessly may lead her to come to incorrect conclusions. And yet prodding might make her explosive or frustrated.

    If you find it difficult talking to her you could try a structured activity like a card game or something so there's less pressure to communicate.
    Unfortunately distance does not permit me to physically visit often as she is in london. However I am moving to University in a few weeks in the midlands which should allow me to go if she is still in hospital. I would prefer in-person tbh as at least then I could hold her hand or hug her for reassurance. Next time I think I may try talking about my end to give her some distraction. I felt self-ish initially but who knows, it may distract her from the fact she hates where she is. I know when I was in hospital myself previously or locked up in a care home, any news of the outside world was welcome.

    You could also write to her so she can remind herself that you care for her even when you aren't there. Postcards could be nice since they'll have a pretty picture too.
    Thank you for this idea. I think cards are a good shout. I'll definitely do this!

    You are very kind to be concerned for her, just remember to take care of yourself too.
    Thanks. It is what I'd want for myself. I've been at positions in my life where I felt no one cared and I would not want her to feel the same way, even if it difficult. But there is a balance to strike. I am starting a new endeavour and cannot jeopardize it.

    Mind.org offers supportive advice for friends and family of people with mh problems. Maybe you could check it out.
    I will, thank you.
 
 
 
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