English literature at university

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    I really want to study english literature at university. I'm about to start A-levels next week, I'm doing English literature, English language, History, and French. For GCSE I got 6 A's (Core Science, Additional Science, Maths, English language, Geography, R.E.) 5 B's (English literature, History, French, Spanish, Japanese) and 1 C (Textiles). I really want to study English literature somewhere like Glasgow University? Would I be in with a chance with these GCSE's? (Also people keep telling me that French is really difficult, and that with a B I will probably fail? Is that true?) Thank you
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    (Original post by Rekishiya4)
    I really want to study english literature at university. I'm about to start A-levels next week, I'm doing English literature, English language, History, and French. For GCSE I got 6 A's (Core Science, Additional Science, Maths, English language, Geography, R.E.) 5 B's (English literature, History, French, Spanish, Japanese) and 1 C (Textiles). I really want to study English literature somewhere like Glasgow University? Would I be in with a chance with these GCSE's? (Also people keep telling me that French is really difficult, and that with a B I will probably fail? Is that true?) Thank you
    Your main point of call would be http://search.ucas.com/ love.
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    (Original post by Rekishiya4)
    I really want to study English literature somewhere like Glasgow University? Would I be in with a chance with these GCSE's?
    Most universities will be paying a lot more attention to your A Levels than to your GCSEs: a good batch of As at A Level will outshine the GCSEs and a less good set of A Level grades will make the GCSEs the least of your problems. If you're concerned, check UCAS and Glasgow's website and see what the specific stated normal requirements are. If you go to any open days you can ask whether they pay much attention to GCSEs.

    (Original post by Rekishiya4)
    (Also people keep telling me that French is really difficult, and that with a B I will probably fail? Is that true?) Thank you
    To my mind, as someone who teaches English at a university, having some background in other languages is a distinct advantage for a student—you've probably already learned a bit more about English from stepping outside it in your French, Spanish and Japanese GCSEs. And some of the more literary bits of most language A Levels are similar to the kinds of study you do in English. So a good A Level grade in French would impress me quite a lot.

    I don't think getting a B in it at GCSE means you'll necessarily fail, but it might mean that you need to buckle down. Language learning, even more than most other subjects, really benefits from daily, little-and-often repetition and practice well in advance of the time when you get round to exam-focused revision. So if you haven't in the past thought about ways to fit in a little bit of independent study and practice for French five or six days a week (it could be just fifteen or twenty-five minutes) then this might be the time to start. But that's just one thought—you can talk to your A Level teachers about your prospects and ways you can find to improve.
 
 
 
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