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    I can't be the only person on TSR trying to teach myself programming. Why not introduce yourself and say hi?
    What are you learning? What stage are you at? What goals do you have?
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I can't be the only person on TSR trying to teach myself programming. Why not introduce yourself and say hi?
    What are you learning? What stage are you at? What goals do you have?
    Hi there, Crag.

    I'm starting to learn Java with a bit of Python. I've bought a couple of study books for uni but I find websites so much more helpful because they're interactive and tell you where you've made a mistake.

    I find learning the syntax the most frustrating part.
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    hey crag

    learning java from books and use of ide's as my main language and i would say i am a beginner at the moment.
    i am also starting to learn GIt, html, CSS and JS

    as for goals i guess become better at them, start to look at self projects around my university timetable etc.
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    Nope, you're certainly not the only person learning a new language.
    I'm quite experienced with Python + Web Stuff (PHP,JS,SQL etc)

    Currently learning how to use Java more effectively and am trying to get better with bash/unix style of scripting.

    woo!
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    Hi,
    I'm not currently learning any programming languages, but I'd like to list the languages I've learnt on my own. I'd just like to post this here incase anybody would like to approach me for any assistance (I'm always happy to help).

    Languages:
    Java, C#, C++, C, VB.net, JavaScript, HTML, PHP, CSS, SQL, Batch, Shell Script, Python.

    My best/favorite languages along with years of experience:
    Java (5), Python (3), VB.net (2), JavaScript (3), PHP (3)
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    I am learning python since my uni course requires me to learn it in my first year. What IDE would you recommend?
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    (Original post by Supersaps)
    I find learning the syntax the most frustrating part.
    Is that because it's quite boring and you just have to engage in a lot of rote learning to master it? Or something else?
    Spoiler:
    Show

    (Original post by sketchymofo2)
    hey crag

    learning java from books and use of ide's as my main language and i would say i am a beginner at the moment.
    i am also starting to learn GIt, html, CSS and JS

    as for goals i guess become better at them, start to look at self projects around my university timetable etc.
    (Original post by CyberJake)
    Nope, you're certainly not the only person learning a new language.
    I'm quite experienced with Python + Web Stuff (PHP,JS,SQL etc)

    Currently learning how to use Java more effectively and am trying to get better with bash/unix style of scripting.

    woo!
    (Original post by Aklaol)
    Hi,
    I'm not currently learning any programming languages, but I'd like to list the languages I've learnt on my own. I'd just like to post this here incase anybody would like to approach me for any assistance (I'm always happy to help).

    Languages:
    Java, C#, C++, C, VB.net, JavaScript, HTML, PHP, CSS, SQL, Batch, Shell Script, Python.

    My best/favorite languages along with years of experience:
    Java (5), Python (3), VB.net (2), JavaScript (3), PHP (3)
    (Original post by BinaryJava)
    I am learning python since my uni course requires me to learn it in my first year. What IDE would you recommend?

    Awesome! Nice to meet you all. @Aklaol thanks for the offer of advice. I will need a lot of it, probably.
    Are you all computer science students, or is anybody doing it completely independently?
    I'm actually a final year Sociology PhD. I spent most of my studies intent on having an academic career. However, part way through my PhD I began to second guess this idea. The political climate at the moment makes things really tough for early career researchers. And, aside from anything else, I wanted a break after years and years of studying my ass off.
    Anyhow, visited the University careers service and nearly died of shock when they suggested I could consider a technical career. It made sense after I thought of it (I'm very motivated by problem solving, and I like finding creative solutions to practical needs), but I had ruled it out as a result of finding maths and chemistry really hard as a school student. So now I'm just teaching myself a bit every day on the side of my studies, really just trying to figure out if I'll be any good at it.
    I've only been seriously doing it for a week, and have only covered HTML and CSS so far. I'm trying to decide whether to go ahead and try javascript, or whether to stop and consolidate what I learned by having a go at making a website already.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Is that because it's quite boring and you just have to engage in a lot of rote learning to master it? Or something else?
    Spoiler:
    Show








    Awesome! Nice to meet you all. @Aklaol thanks for the offer of advice. I will need a lot of it, probably.
    Are you all computer science students, or is anybody doing it completely independently?
    I'm actually a final year Sociology PhD. I spent most of my studies intent on having an academic career. However, part way through my PhD I began to second guess this idea. The political climate at the moment makes things really tough for early career researchers. And, aside from anything else, I wanted a break after years and years of studying my ass off.
    Anyhow, visited the University careers service and nearly died of shock when they suggested I could consider a technical career. It made sense after I thought of it (I'm very motivated by problem solving, and I like finding creative solutions to practical needs), but I had ruled it out as a result of finding maths and chemistry really hard as a school student. So now I'm just teaching myself a bit every day on the side of my studies, really just trying to figure out if I'll be any good at it.
    I've only been seriously doing it for a week, and have only covered HTML and CSS so far. I'm trying to decide whether to go ahead and try javascript, or whether to stop and consolidate what I learned by having a go at making a website already.
    Well you aren't going to be making anything impressive without Javascript knowledge. I'd advise that you cover some Javascript, and then use your HTML, CSS and Javascript knowledge to make a website.


    (Original post by BinaryJava)
    I am learning python since my uni course requires me to learn it in my first year. What IDE would you recommend?
    Pycharm for sure.
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    (Original post by Aklaol)
    Well you aren't going to be making anything impressive without Javascript knowledge. I'd advise that you cover some Javascript, and then use your HTML, CSS and Javascript knowledge to make a website.
    Thanks. Yeh for sure, I'm not so much worried about creating anything worthwhile at the moment. I'm more just concerned about consolidating my knowledge and making sure I'm familiar with things before moving ahead. There seems to be nothing conceptual about HTML or CSS. It's all syntax and learning the vocabulary. So I figured making a really basic old school website, perhaps with some forms or whatever, might help me to memorise and consolidate what I learnt.

    What is an ICE?
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    (Original post by Supersaps)
    I'm starting to learn Java with a bit of Python. I've bought a couple of study books for uni but I find websites so much more helpful because they're interactive and tell you where you've made a mistake.

    I find learning the syntax the most frustrating part.
    Using a good IDE such as IntelliJ IDEA (Java) or PyCharm (Python) can make a massive difference. With Java, once you master the key points of object orientated programming, static concepts, instantiating new classes and other concepts, you should be alright. Since you're starting to learn Java, the best place you can refer to is here. I find that referring to the original documentation helps with learning so much more than videos. Bear in mind if you're doing something wrong, there's most likely someone who's made that error before you and has asked for help on Stack Overflow.

    Bear in mind while learning, you will reach a point where you look over your old code and think, "was I really that bad?". This reflection can pose as one of the best ways of improving your skills. When we start out, everything isn't as easy as it seems. Common newbie mistakes tend to include inefficient looping, static abuse and lack of object orientated programming concepts. You'll reach the point where your skills advance and you're able to fix up based on your previous mistakes.

    If you're completely new to programming, I would recommend familiarizing yourself with Python since it's a much simpler language. Personally, I prefer Java because of it's flexibility but jumping straight in can be frightening.
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    How well does javascript prepare you for other kinds of programming?
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    How well does javascript prepare you for other kinds of programming?
    Eh... To be honest with you, if you really want a good programming language to start off with in order to get a grasp of programming I'd go with just normal Java.
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    (Original post by Aklaol)
    Eh... To be honest with you, if you really want a good programming language to start off with in order to get a grasp of programming I'd go with just normal Java.
    Ok fair enough I have a fairly rigid structure to follow because I'm hoping to secure a place on a bootcamp, and they had particular preferences regarding how applicants prepare for the course. I'll eventually get to java I hope.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Ok fair enough I have a fairly rigid structure to follow because I'm hoping to secure a place on a bootcamp, and they had particular preferences regarding how applicants prepare for the course. I'll eventually get to java I hope.
    Java was my first programming knowledge, and I can honestly say that I probably would have struggled with other languages if I didn't learn Java first. Java is a great object-oriented, high level programming language to learn as a first language. Highly recommend you start to learn it in your spare time, it'll serve as a massive benefit.
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    I started trying to learn Java at the start of the summer (oh, the many app ideas I have...) but I found it really hard to move from simply copying out of a textbook/website to knowing how to do even the most simple of tasks myself? Does anybody have any advice, or links?

    Currently I was using SAMS teach yourself Java in 24 hrs which, then some websites like codeacademy.

    My only coding background is that I used to know a fair amount of HTML years back. 10 year old me was better with computers than I am...
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    (Original post by 1010marina)
    :blah:
    :hello: I can't comment, but no doubt the others can.
    (Original post by Aklaol)
    Java was my first programming knowledge, and I can honestly say that I probably would have struggled with other languages if I didn't learn Java first. Java is a great object-oriented, high level programming language to learn as a first language. Highly recommend you start to learn it in your spare time, it'll serve as a massive benefit.
    That is useful to know, thank you!
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    I could swear Codecademy didn't have half their content up behind a paywall when I registered a year ago :banghead:
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    Hi there everyone,
    Quite experienced in a variety of languages including C, C++, C#, Python, Javascript and more!
    All self taught using the web and books. I'd be happy to give advice or answer questions to the fullest of my ability despite my young age (14) but I'm sure there are people out there like me!
    Any questions ?
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I could swear Codecademy didn't have half their content up behind a paywall when I registered a year ago :banghead:
    Nope they didn't, everything they had was free, but I think it's enabled them to increase the content they do have (albeit having to pay for a lot of it...!).

    I'm teaching myself too - mainly Python, and a chunk of VBA purely because I was using it for a bunch of automation for work!
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    How well does javascript prepare you for other kinds of programming?
    Depends on what you want to do, what is interesting to you, and what level of knowledge you have.
    Javascript would be good if you wanted to get started with web development - but only for web development.
    For any other easy starter language, with which you can do actual practical projects quickly and easily, I would go with Python. Easy to read syntax and quick to learn while very useful at the same time.
    I personally started with C/C++ - not the best first language but when I learnt it other languages were much more simpler to me.
    What is your field of interest? Web? Hardware such as AVR or ARM? Software? Game development?
 
 
 
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