Ethics Question Watch

KerryP
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#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#1
I'm in a job where I work part-time during term time and full time outside.

I have a colleague at who has expressed his desire to leave in confidence to me on more than one occasion in the past few weeks; I believe he will leave, yet he still hasn't notified the manager. Because our contracts are highly flexible, he can leave on a days notice.

The reason I'm concerned is because we work in teams of 3, one team leader and two analysts. Myself and the colleague in question are in one of these given teams. Every so often we go through a very busy cycle which lasts about a month to 2 months where the team leader passes work to the two of us and we end up working flat out to meet the deadlines.

We've both been in the job for over a year and the training involved to be able to work efficiently takes approximately 1-2 months depending on personal skills and attitude.

Here's the problem... because he hasn't told our manager, no-one has been drafted in to replace him and I'm expecting him to leave within the next two to three weeks. This leaves me with over 80 man-hours of work a week for 2 months and no support analyst.

Do I;

- Tell my manager which could possibly cause friction between my colleague and myself (we're pretty good friends)?
- Not say anything and hope for the best?
- Insist (for the 100th time) that he informs the manager?
- Run away and cry?

Thanks in advance,
kp
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Segat1
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#2
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Encourage your colleauge to tell your manager his plans. Stress to him that you will be under a heap of pressure doing two people's jobs.

If he doesn't drop him in it. If he's your mate, he'll care about your wellbeing and not making your job hell.
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Fluent in Lies
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#3
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Hire somone to kill them. Take a paid 2 weeks leave of absence whilst you get therapy etc. to overcome the tragic loss of a colleague. In that time work will have found a replacement.
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KerryP
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#4
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Very constructive. Thanks.........
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Vohamanah
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#5
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A colleague of mine was in the same situation, she covered 2 days shifts with another girl, who told her she planned to leave. My colleague didn't say anything to the boss, then when the girl did leave giving a days notice, my colleague had a heap extra work to do and also (for some insane reason) the girl that left had a massive shouting match with the boss when she left, and told him that my colleague had known she was leaving all along. :rolleyes:

Seemed like petty point-scoring to me, but my colleague then had the awkward task of explaining the girl's comment to the boss as well, and admitting that she had known.

Nevertheless, I agree with my colleague. She felt blabbing about her plans was disloyal, and that it had to be the girl's choice whether she gave a decent amount of notice or not. In the end I was drafted in to cover the other girl's shifts. Personally I wouldn't tell, and it is really up to your boss to ensure if another person is needed, another person is found. You can't do the work of 2 people by yourself.
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dave
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#6
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(Original post by KerryP)
Do I;

1. - Tell my manager which could possibly cause friction between my colleague and myself (we're pretty good friends)?
2. - Not say anything and hope for the best?
3. - Insist (for the 100th time) that he informs the manager?
4. - Run away and cry?

Thanks in advance,
kp
1. No. You'll do yourself no favours by indicating that you can't keep a confidence. Besides which, it's not your place to tell.
2. I'd prefer to call it "keeping my own counsel" - and I'd go with this option.
3. You can try - but I wouldn't hold my breath.
4. :rolleyes:
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Clubber Lang
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#7
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why would you have 8o hours of work?
just refuse to do any of the extra work.
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Fishfinger Sandwich
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(Original post by Clubber Lang)
why would you have 8o hours of work?
just refuse to do any of the extra work.
Exactly.
Don't tell the manager. I'm sure they won't force you to do al the extra work after your mate leaves, sure you might have to pick up the slack a bit but no-one can expect you to do the work of two people.

Encourage him to tell the manager but if he doesn't I reckon you should just leave him to it.
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Vesta
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#9
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Run away and cry :rolleyes:

But no - tell your mate that it's not fair of him just to leave and drop you in it, tell him if he wants to leave he has to notify the manager - for your sake.
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