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B1049 – Supermarket Waste Bill 2016 Watch

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    B1049 – Supermarket Waste Bill 2016, TSR Labour Party

    Supermarket Waste Bill 2016
    An Act to prevent food waste by forcing supermarkets to give all of their unsold produce to charities.


    BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

    1: Definitions
    (1) Supermarket is a large self-service shop selling foods and household goods.
    (2) Unsold produce are food items which have not been purchased and the supermarket or food shop no longer wants to keep them. These include products that don't meet store policy on shelf presentation standards but are fit for consumption.(3) A donation contract is a legally binding agreement between an individual store and a charity or homeless shelter which demands that the store shall donate all of its unsold produce to the charity or homeless shelter in question.

    2: Recycling of Unsold Produce
    (1) All supermarkets and other food shops that have an annual revenue of over £100 million must give all their unsold produce to charities or homeless shelters.
    (2) The supermarkets and food shops will be exempt from claims for any illness or disease caused by food given under this bill.
    (3) It is the responsibility of the charity or homeless shelter to collect the unsold produce.
    (4) Each individual store must sign a donation contract with a charity or homeless shelter which regularly provide food for people in need.
    (5) If a store does not fulfil its donation contract, the chairty or homeless shelter may file a complaint to DEFRA.
    (6) Businesses for which this bill applies to must disclose the amount of food waste in their whole production line.

    3: Penalties
    Any business found guilty of failing to meet these guidelines will be forced to pay £100,000.

    4: Extent, Commencement and Short Title
    (1) This Act extends to the United Kingdom.
    (2) The provisions of this Act come into force on 1st October 2017.
    (3) This Act may be cited as the Supermarket Waste Act 2016.



    Notes

    This bill helps to solve two major problems that face our country. One is the amount of food waste and the methods used to dispose of it. Food waste costs Great Britain £2.94bn each year and 14 million tonnes of food each year are dumped, twice the EU average. By not disposing of food waste by binning it, greenhouse gases released through food waste could be significantly reduced. The decomposition of solid waste in landfills results in the release of methane, a greenhouse gas 21 times more potent than carbon dioxide. Another problem is that some homeless people struggle to get enough substantial food to eat. There are estimated tobe 185,000 homeless people in the UK at the moment and these people need our help. By forcing supermarkets and other food shops to give their food waste to charities, you would solve the issue of environmentally destructive forms of waste disposal by solving the issue of providing enough food to homeless charities and shelters.

    France and Italy are just a few of the countries recently who have enforced a similar law and begun the process of tackling food waste.There is no reason why we can’t do the same as this bill could provide several significant benefits. Tesco recently announced that it would try to eradicate all food waste from its stores and distribution centres by 2017. If it is possible for a multi-national company such as Tesco for do this, there is no reason why all other supermarkets and food shops can’t follow suit.


    Here are some articles related to this bill:
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...y-supermarkets
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...-a6931681.html
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/bu...-a6861196.html
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/bu...-a6925971.html
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    Okay, so imagine that I run tesco.
    I decide that this is all well and good but it isn't profitable for me so I set up my own charity which gets food from my stores and then sells this food to the poor for knock down prices. What's to stop me doing this?
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    Obviously the odd thing about it is you're saying "this food is jot fit for sale, so we should give it to the poor" okay...

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    Aye! An excellent idea, as far as I am concerned.

    It may be a good idea, however, to establish that supermarkets cannot sell produce which has passed its sell-by date, but this produce may still be fit for human consumption and so this produce should be donated. Or something of a similar manner, at least.
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    Undecided.

    The problem with this bill is that most supermarkets don't just chuck it out, they sell it or already make agreements with charities so your potentially removing a revenue stream.

    I may abstain i think.
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    Aye! As for those talking about revenue from reductions — that's only half the story, stock gets thrown out for not arriving in the right temperature, ripped packaging, unappealing, bruised, many things. They're only reduced within reason and for supermarkets like Waitrose any bad produce is thrown out although I believe a lot of it already does go to charity.
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    I support the idea behind this bill but I have a couple of issues.
    1. Define 'charity' and 'homeless shelter'.
    2. Don't describe a supermarket as 'self-service' in the definitions. Supermarkets could conceivably argue that they are not fully self-service, as there is almost always an option to be served by a human cashier when paying for items.
    3. No provision is included to ensure that the food donated is actually fit for human consumption - most will be, but there will be some stuff that is being rejected because it's gone off early. Particularly with fruit and vegetables, including something that has gone off in a batch of food can make the rest of the food go off, making the entire operation pointless.
    4. Why are businesses with a revenue of under £100 million exempt? Smaller food selling businesses waste food too, and this could lead to greedy capitalists doing underhand tricks to keep their company's revenue just under £100 million to avoid having to donate food.
    5. A £100,000 fine? Seriously? To a large business like a major supermarket, £100,000 is peanuts. Make the fines graded in some way, or find another way to punish larger businesses that will actually hurt them.
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    (Original post by Aph)
    Okay, so imagine that I run tesco.
    I decide that this is all well and good but it isn't profitable for me so I set up my own charity which gets food from my stores and then sells this food to the poor for knock down prices. What's to stop me doing this?
    That wouldn't be a charity. A charity has to conform with the requirements of the Charities Act.

    (Original post by cranbrook_aspie)
    I support the idea behind this bill but I have a couple of issues.
    1. Define 'charity' and 'homeless shelter'.
    2. Don't describe a supermarket as 'self-service' in the definitions. Supermarkets could conceivably argue that they are not fully self-service, as there is almost always an option to be served by a human cashier when paying for items.
    3. No provision is included to ensure that the food donated is actually fit for human consumption - most will be, but there will be some stuff that is being rejected because it's gone off early. Particularly with fruit and vegetables, including something that has gone off in a batch of food can make the rest of the food go off, making the entire operation pointless.
    4. Why are businesses with a revenue of under £100 million exempt? Smaller food selling businesses waste food too, and this could lead to greedy capitalists doing underhand tricks to keep their company's revenue just under £100 million to avoid having to donate food.
    5. A £100,000 fine? Seriously? To a large business like a major supermarket, £100,000 is peanuts. Make the fines graded in some way, or find another way to punish larger businesses that will actually hurt them.
    Point 3 is intentional. Requiring the supermarkets to do that kind of control imposes an unreasonable burden and cost - instead, passing it to the receiving charity to carry out such checks makes more sense.
    4: Revenues under £100m are literally peanuts, and the cost this imposes is much greater proportionally for small businesses who can't take advantage of economies of scale. Also, revenue is REALLY hard to cheat. That's why it's 'revenue' and not 'profit'.
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    I think that the fine should be per offence as £100k overall for a big chain is not a lot. Aye otherwise.
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    Problem with a donation contract and a supermarket not fulfilling it is that supply of this waste food will vary, sometimes quite dramatically, especially if supermarkets form other contracts where they sell off this waste food.
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    aye
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    (Original post by cranbrook_aspie)
    I support the idea behind this bill but I have a couple of issues.
    1. Define 'charity' and 'homeless shelter'.
    2. Don't describe a supermarket as 'self-service' in the definitions. Supermarkets could conceivably argue that they are not fully self-service, as there is almost always an option to be served by a human cashier when paying for items.
    3. No provision is included to ensure that the food donated is actually fit for human consumption - most will be, but there will be some stuff that is being rejected because it's gone off early. Particularly with fruit and vegetables, including something that has gone off in a batch of food can make the rest of the food go off, making the entire operation pointless.
    4. Why are businesses with a revenue of under £100 million exempt? Smaller food selling businesses waste food too, and this could lead to greedy capitalists doing underhand tricks to keep their company's revenue just under £100 million to avoid having to donate food.
    5. A £100,000 fine? Seriously? To a large business like a major supermarket, £100,000 is peanuts. Make the fines graded in some way, or find another way to punish larger businesses that will actually hurt them.
    We will definitely need at least a second reading for this bill and I'm glad you support the idea.

    I think the bit about self-service means a customer goes around the shop, serving themselves; I don't think it refers to the checkout.

    I understand point 3 but can't the charity just leave what they don't want to take?

    It was originally businesses under £10m will come under this law but we decided that we shouldn't burden the really small businesses, but instead encourage them to follow what the large businesses are going to do.

    I agree that the £100,000 fine is perhaps too lenient. I think some sort of grading system could work or perhaps a large increase in corporation tax?
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    (Original post by iEthan)
    Aye! An excellent idea, as far as I am concerned.

    It may be a good idea, however, to establish that supermarkets cannot sell produce which has passed its sell-by date, but this produce may still be fit for human consumption and so this produce should be donated. Or something of a similar manner, at least.
    Although supermarkets can currently sell produce which is past its 'best-before', they cannot sell produce which is past its 'use-by' date. 'Sell-by' dates are in-between and for most products, use-by dates are at least a few days after the sell-by dates so they will still be fit for consumption.
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    (Original post by Aph)
    Okay, so imagine that I run tesco.
    I decide that this is all well and good but it isn't profitable for me so I set up my own charity which gets food from my stores and then sells this food to the poor for knock down prices. What's to stop me doing this?
    As TDA says, that wouldn't count as a charity (or homeless shelter) so therefore a supermarket would not be allowed to do that.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Obviously the odd thing about it is you're saying "this food is jot fit for sale, so we should give it to the poor" okay...

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    Definition 2 clearly states that 'these include products that don't meet store policy on shelf presentation standards but are fit for consumption.' For example, some supermarkets take products off the shelves even earlier than they need to, just to cover themselves.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Undecided.

    The problem with this bill is that most supermarkets don't just chuck it out, they sell it or already make agreements with charities so your potentially removing a revenue stream.

    I may abstain i think.
    Not many supermarkets sell their unwanted produce, simply because they don't want to be responsible for potentially unsafe food, even if it's perfectly edible.

    Some supermarkets, such as Tesco, do currently make arrangements with charities but the problem is, there's nothing stopping them from chucking it away instead and no way currently to force reluctant supermarkets to do the same.
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    Problem with a donation contract and a supermarket not fulfilling it is that supply of this waste food will vary, sometimes quite dramatically, especially if supermarkets form other contracts where they sell off this waste food.
    Supermarkets will be forced to honour their donation contracts though and if they don't, the chairty or homeless shelter they have the deal with may file a complaint to DEFRA.
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    (Original post by Quamquam123)
    Not many supermarkets sell their unwanted produce, simply because they don't want to be responsible for potentially unsafe food, even if it's perfectly edible.

    Some supermarkets, such as Tesco, do currently make arrangements with charities but the problem is, there's nothing stopping them from chucking it away instead and no way currently to force reluctant supermarkets to do the same.
    Some sell it to farms for animal food.

    I don't have a problem with fining them for food waste, that's actually a good idea. My issue with this bill is that your telling them to give it to charities for free. So long as they don't bin it, it should be the firms which are free to do as they please with it.
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    (Original post by Quamquam123)
    Supermarkets will be forced to honour their donation contracts though and if they don't, the chairty or homeless shelter they have the deal with may file a complaint to DEFRA.
    Yeh I get that, but at times where they simply have sold most of the food or whatever, that's not their fault, and you're taking basically stripping the supermarket of its rights of being a business by saying that they'd always have to honour a contract of giving stuff away, over them doing something commercially beneficial to them.
    That's why I'd never ever support this Bill.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Some sell it to farms for animal food.

    I don't have a problem with fining them for food waste, that's actually a good idea. My issue with this bill is that your telling them to give it to charities for free. So long as they don't bin it, it should be the firms which are free to do as they please with it.
    I understand where you're coming from but there's a danger that all supermakrets could use this just to wriggle out of any hassle and if they all did this, the charities and homeless shelters would be no better off.
 
 
 
Updated: September 22, 2016
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