Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    :lol: Maybe I just have a perverse sense of humour. It's from 100 years ago, that might explain the archaic references

    The case[2] involved a Mr Albert Haddock, often an ingenious litigant. In this case, Haddock had been in disagreement with the Collector of Taxes over the size of his tax bill. Haddock complained that the sum was excessive, particularly in view of the inadequateconsideration he believed that he received from that Government in service. Eventually the Collector demanded £57 and 10 shillings.

    Haddock appeared at the offices of the Collector of Taxes and delivered a white cow "of malevolent aspect". On the cow was stencilled in red ink:

    To the London and Literary Bank, Limited
    Pay the Collector of Taxes, who is no gentleman, or Order, the sum of fifty seven pounds £57/0/0 (and may he rot!)
    ALBERT HADDOCK

    Haddock tendered the cow in payment of his bill and demanded a receipt.During the hearing the judge Sir Basil String, enquired whether stamp duty had been paid. The prosecutor, Sir Joshua Hoot KC confirmed that a two-penny stamp was affixed to the dexter horn of the cow. The collector declined the cow, objecting that it would be impossible to pay it into a bank account. Haddock suggested that he endorse the cow to a third party to whom he might owe money, adding that "there must be many persons in that position".

    Sir Joshua informed the court that the collector did try to endorse the cheque on its back, in this case on the abdomen. However, Sir Joshua explained: "[t]he cow ... appeared to resent endorsement and adopted a menacing posture."

    The collector abandoned the attempt and declined to take the cheque. Haddock led the cow away and was arrested in Trafalgar Square for causing an obstruction, leading to the co-joined criminal case, R. v Haddock.He testified that he had tendered a cheque in payment of income tax. A cheque was only an order to a bank to pay money to the person in possession of the cheque or a person named on the cheque, and there was nothing in law to say it must be on paper of specified dimensions. A cheque, he argued, could be written on notepaper. He said he had "drawn cheques on the backs of menus, on napkins, on handkerchiefs, on the labels of wine bottles; all these cheques had been duly honoured by his bank and passed through the Bankers’ Clearing House". He thought that there was no distinction in law between a cheque on a napkin and a cheque on a cow.

    When asked as to motive, he said he had not a piece of paper to hand. Horses and other animals used to be seen frequently in the streets of London. He admitted on cross-examination that he may have had in his mind an idea to ridicule the taxman. "But why not? There is no law against ridiculing the income tax."[2]In relation to the criminal prosecution, Haddock said it was a nice thing if in the heart of the commercial capital of the world a man could not convey a negotiable instrument down the street without being arrested. If a disturbance was caused by a crowd, the policeman should arrest the crowd, not him.

    The judge, sympathetic to Haddock, found in his favour on the tax claim and prosecution for causing a disturbance. By tendering and being refused the cow, the other parties were estopped from then demanding it later.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I have no energy to read this
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by L-Lawliet)
    I have no energy to read this
    What a boring, sullen post. Nobody is forcing you to read it, or cares whether you do or don't.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AlexanderHam)
    What a boring, sullen post. Nobody is forcing you to read it, or cares whether you do or don't.
    You sound mad because no one is interested in your post.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by L-Lawliet)
    You sound mad because no one is interested in your post.
    I found it droll. If you're so goddamned lethargic that you can no longer parse long-form text, either take a Berocca or go to bed.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Profesh)
    I found it droll. If you're so goddamned lethargic that you can no longer parse long-form text, either take a Berocca or go to bed.
    Or I can find another interesting post to read.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by L-Lawliet)
    You sound mad because no one is interested in your post.
    Wow. With wit like that. I'm sure you'll go far in the law
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Profesh)
    I found it droll.
    The author does have a kind of cute, understated prose style. I love how the cow has a "malevolent aspect", and also when the Tax Inspector tried to endorse the cow to a third party, it "adopted a menacing posture".
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AlexanderHam)
    Wow. With wit like that. I'm sure you'll go far in the law
    Who said I wanted to do law?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.