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    Hello everyone,

    I'm new to the IB programme and was wondering if it would be a good thing to complete my EE within the first half of my DP1 programme?

    Or what about my TOK essay? Is that even possible? Don't the question choices get published at the end of DP2?

    I guess the umbrella question here is what things can I get out of the way and complete asap so that when everyone else is rushing to submit their essays while juggling their revision schedules, I can concentrate a 100% on my revision and not some 4,000 word research essay? I'm absolutely clueless and I'd appreciate every single message, any amount of help I can get. The goal is to complete as many objectives as I can (and not leave it for a year later when the course will be 10x rigorous and it'll be much harder to pen a good essay). It pains me to consider the possibility that I could pen my EE today and be done with it. The main concern I have is whether my current grasp on my subjects (having only been in the programme for a month) will allow for a satisfactory essay that preferably lands me an A.

    Thoughts? Objections? Advice?

    I want to hear it all.

    - Rey
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    Hi,
    I'm in DP2 and I am editing my final draft of my extended essay. I would not suggest doing your extended essay before Christmas. In my opinion, you learn some vital skills within the first year of IB that come to help you with your extended essay. In March I was asked to pick my topic, but I only started writing and spoke to my supervisor in April/May. Having such a long summer holiday leaves you plenty of time to relax, do homework, and most importantly work on your extended essay. If you are disciplined with writing your extended essay, you can get a huge chunk done during your summer holiday. I did this, and now I have very little to do. I am currently trying to cut down my word count, however, there are other people in my year who have only written 2000 words.

    In terms of your ToK essay, the titles come out in early September, and so I have just received my titles.:eek: So you can't start that yet just yet, but you could start planning what you want to do for your ToK presentation.

    If you're eager to get a lot of course work done, then it's worth talking to your teachers. If you do economics (like me) then you're going to have to wait until you study the topic before you can do your IA, otherwise you are going to end up with mistake that can be avoided with time. A lot of teachers at my school don't start IAs until after Christmas so that we got into the swing of the subject and understood more.

    Hope this helped!
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    It really depends on which subject you're doing your EE in.

    If you're doing your EE in languages and are incredibly gifted at Literature/other, you can get your EE done pretty early (wouldn't recommend rushing it for the sake of it though). If you're doing science or humanities, usually you do require more time because of the research you have to do for your EE. With humanities, you have to read up on available literature in libraries, and for science, you'll have to do experiments and repeat them which will essentially take you weeks to months to a year because it's just realistically impossible to complete your research in a short period of time. This is just a simplified summary for comparison of course, some language EEs do require a little research, and I have no idea how people do math EEs so I'm not going to go there.

    I understand your reason for wanting to get things out of the way. Personally, I starting researching EE topics quite early on, perhaps even before IB1 started. I'm a biology-person but because I don't like research, I decided to opt for English Literature instead. Read about 7 or so books before "EE Subject selection phase" began, and decided on a good book for my EE. By the time I first met my mentor, I had written down just under 2000 words for my EE (a lot of which I didn't use in the end, i think). Over the next two or so years in IB, I just kept working on refining my EE, a little research on critical theory, and refining my EE again. So that's my experience, and I'll be commenting from a Lit-sy point of view.

    To answer your concern about getting EE out of the way as early as possible:the answer is you could, but you don't want to rush your EE and produce something that is not as good as it could have been if you had spent more time on it. The reason why EE is given over the course of IB is because it takes time to produce something that's of high quality. Not just because you have to do a billion experiments in some cases (this does take quite a chunk of time don't get me wrong), but writing an essay of 4000 words needs countless refinements to come out concise and coherent. Not saying it's impossible to write a really good essay in a short time, there have been language students who do EEs in a week and produce As. But for us mortals, spending a little more time working on our EEs is always good. Also, there are some things (interpretations/epiphanies/scientific conclusions) that may not come to you in early stages, but they come to you months later like a lightbulb and you end up editing your EE. Especially in English, cause sometimes if you re-read texts again, you might pick up something you initially missed. Also, when I first met my mentor, I realized my 2000 words were not good enough and basically rewrote my entire first draft.

    Moreover, you don't necessarily need to (or need to worry about needing to) finish your EE early. The reason why I say you don't need to worry so much about your EE is because if you work consistently at it, it will never become overwhelming. Note that I said only if you're consistent with it. Look at it this way, if you start early, and just write about 100 words every time you get to it, it's a mere 40 days of work, which gives you hundreds of days to edit/refine (you will spend a lot of time editing). It's not the writing that's the issue so much so as consistency. Some science students either choose too large topics, get lazy, or for some reason don't do their lab work consistently and end up having to rush a ton of repeat experiments because they are not consistent. Don't let things you need to do for your EE accumulate and you'll be fine. If you have experiments to do, do them. If you have research to do, do it. It is very manageable if you're consistent because when you come to IB2 mid year or so, you should just be editing your 3000+ word essay to make it perfect. (or cutting down from 10000 words for some science essays - Yes, it's possible). Editing isn't easy and it'll take some of your time, but at least it's not conducting experiments over and over. You will be able to cope with making your EE as perfect as possible and working on your IOC and other assessments.

    So my advice to you is, if you feel like you currently have a lot of time, have a think on what you would like to do for your EE. Think of EE topic questions, scrutinize them and make sure you can address them in 4k words - map out the structure of your EE. Do your research. Check if your school/lab has the materials you need. (Please don't order some rare material - it might take forever to arrive and screw you over big time). Make an EE proposal that is as detailed as possible that you can show your mentor and ask for advice on. About level of knowledge, I honestly wouldn't be bothered by what you know now reason being even if you learned all the content in IB, the knowledge you'll use in EE is probably above that or different so the only way you can learn enough to produce a good essay is by doing your own research.

    I graduated a few years back but I do believe TOK essay is only done in Year 2 if I remember correctly. It's 2k words, and it's well-doable in a year. No worries. You can, of course, read up on your TOK textbook and grasp the concepts first.

    I don't want to go on and on, so I'm just going to leave it at this first. Do ask if you have any other specific questions. I'll be happy to help. Cheers.
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    (Original post by sophielophie)
    Hi,
    I am currently trying to cut down my word count, however, there are other people in my year who have only written 2000 words.
    Haha you just reminded me that most people normally end up with more words than the word count. I had the opposite problem when I was doing my EE trying to get as close to 4000 as possible. Think I was at 3.6k in the end (Lit EE and being noob at Lit problems), but now that I think about it, yes, most people do need to cut down in the end. So to OP there really isn't a need to worry about not having enough words.

    PS: it was really funny seeing how some Bio EE students end up with 10k words and trying to squeeze stuff into their appendixes.
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    (Original post by sophielophie)
    Hi,
    I'm in DP2 and I am editing my final draft of my extended essay. I would not suggest doing your extended essay before Christmas. In my opinion, you learn some vital skills within the first year of IB that come to help you with your extended essay. In March I was asked to pick my topic, but I only started writing and spoke to my supervisor in April/May. Having such a long summer holiday leaves you plenty of time to relax, do homework, and most importantly work on your extended essay. If you are disciplined with writing your extended essay, you can get a huge chunk done during your summer holiday. I did this, and now I have very little to do. I am currently trying to cut down my word count, however, there are other people in my year who have only written 2000 words.

    In terms of your ToK essay, the titles come out in early September, and so I have just received my titles.:eek: So you can't start that yet just yet, but you could start planning what you want to do for your ToK presentation.

    If you're eager to get a lot of course work done, then it's worth talking to your teachers. If you do economics (like me) then you're going to have to wait until you study the topic before you can do your IA, otherwise you are going to end up with mistake that can be avoided with time. A lot of teachers at my school don't start IAs until after Christmas so that we got into the swing of the subject and understood more.

    Hope this helped!
    Thank you! Yes, it did help. So I suppose I just relax and focus on revision of what I've learned hitherto. Good luck with your EE!
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    (Original post by hipsterrapunzel)
    It really depends on which subject you're doing your EE in.

    If you're doing your EE in languages and are incredibly gifted at Literature/other, you can get your EE done pretty early (wouldn't recommend rushing it for the sake of it though). If you're doing science or humanities, usually you do require more time because of the research you have to do for your EE. With humanities, you have to read up on available literature in libraries, and for science, you'll have to do experiments and repeat them which will essentially take you weeks to months to a year because it's just realistically impossible to complete your research in a short period of time. This is just a simplified summary for comparison of course, some language EEs do require a little research, and I have no idea how people do math EEs so I'm not going to go there.

    I understand your reason for wanting to get things out of the way. Personally, I starting researching EE topics quite early on, perhaps even before IB1 started. I'm a biology-person but because I don't like research, I decided to opt for English Literature instead. Read about 7 or so books before "EE Subject selection phase" began, and decided on a good book for my EE. By the time I first met my mentor, I had written down just under 2000 words for my EE (a lot of which I didn't use in the end, i think). Over the next two or so years in IB, I just kept working on refining my EE, a little research on critical theory, and refining my EE again. So that's my experience, and I'll be commenting from a Lit-sy point of view.

    To answer your concern about getting EE out of the way as early as possible:the answer is you could, but you don't want to rush your EE and produce something that is not as good as it could have been if you had spent more time on it. The reason why EE is given over the course of IB is because it takes time to produce something that's of high quality. Not just because you have to do a billion experiments in some cases (this does take quite a chunk of time don't get me wrong), but writing an essay of 4000 words needs countless refinements to come out concise and coherent. Not saying it's impossible to write a really good essay in a short time, there have been language students who do EEs in a week and produce As. But for us mortals, spending a little more time working on our EEs is always good. Also, there are some things (interpretations/epiphanies/scientific conclusions) that may not come to you in early stages, but they come to you months later like a lightbulb and you end up editing your EE. Especially in English, cause sometimes if you re-read texts again, you might pick up something you initially missed. Also, when I first met my mentor, I realized my 2000 words were not good enough and basically rewrote my entire first draft.

    Moreover, you don't necessarily need to (or need to worry about needing to) finish your EE early.The reason why I say you don't need to worry so much about your EE is because if you work consistently at it, it will never become overwhelming. Note that I said only if you're consistent with it. Look at it this way, if you start early, and just write about 100 words every time you get to it, it's a mere 40 days of work, which gives you hundreds of days to edit/refine (you will spend a lot of time editing). It's not the writing that's the issue so much so as consistency. Some science students either choose too large topics, get lazy, or for some reason don't do their lab work consistently and end up having to rush a ton of repeat experiments because they are not consistent. Don't let things you need to do for your EE accumulate and you'll be fine. If you have experiments to do, do them. If you have research to do, do it. It is very manageable if you're consistent because when you come to IB2 mid year or so, you should just be editing your 3000+ word essay to make it perfect. (or cutting down from 10000 words for some science essays - Yes, it's possible). Editing isn't easy and it'll take some of your time, but at least it's not conducting experiments over and over. You will be able to cope with making your EE as perfect as possible and working on your IOC and other assessments.

    So my advice to you is, if you feel like you currently have a lot of time, have a think on what you would like to do for your EE. Think of EE topic questions, scrutinize them and make sure you can address them in 4k words - map out the structure of your EE. Do your research. Check if your school/lab has the materials you need. (Please don't order some rare material - it might take forever to arrive and screw you over big time). Make an EE proposal that is as detailed as possible that you can show your mentor and ask for advice on. About level of knowledge, I honestly wouldn't be bothered by what you know now reason being even if you learned all the content in IB, the knowledge you'll use in EE is probably above that or different so the only way you can learn enough to produce a good essay is by doing your own research.

    I graduated a few years back but I do believe TOK essay is only done in Year 2 if I remember correctly. It's 2k words, and it's well-doable in a year. No worries. You can, of course, read up on your TOK textbook and grasp the concepts first.

    I don't want to go on and on, so I'm just going to leave it at this first. Do ask if you have any other specific questions. I'll be happy to help. Cheers.
    I'm a generally anxious person, so it's very hard to assure me and calm me down yet you and the previous poster hit the nail right on the head! Thank you so much for putting so much effort into your reply. One more question though: I'm a big time reader, of not just books (tbh don't really have that much time for them anymore) but anything that even remotely catches my interest (shoddy resource websites where the OP decides to go on a tangent about the spider they've befriended/reddit shitposts/misc. posters and pamphlets that don't even matter/literally anything with text? I'll read it). For that reason I have taken English Literature HL and am leaning towards doing my EE on either that or Business Mgmt HL. I was wondering if you could share any pointers since your own essay was on English as well?

    Thank you

    EDIT: Though it's well resolved that I won't be hurrying to start my EE just yet, it's no harm trying to familiarise myself with it if I can. Again, thanks a lot!
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    (Original post by reylancer)
    I'm a generally anxious person, so it's very hard to assure me and calm me down yet you and the previous poster hit the nail right on the head! Thank you so much for putting so much effort into your reply. One more question though: I'm a big time reader, of not just books (tbh don't really have that much time for them anymore) but anything that even remotely catches my interest (shoddy resource websites where the OP decides to go on a tangent about the spider they've befriended/reddit shitposts/misc. posters and pamphlets that don't even matter/literally anything with text? I'll read it). For that reason I have taken English Literature HL and am leaning towards doing my EE on either that or Business Mgmt HL. I was wondering if you could share any pointers since your own essay was on English as well?

    Thank you

    EDIT: Though it's well resolved that I won't be hurrying to start my EE just yet, it's no harm trying to familiarise myself with it if I can. Again, thanks a lot!
    Hey! You're welcome.

    I'll just refer you to this: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2663530. Wrote it a few years back, hope it's still relevant.

    Let me know if you have any other questions.
 
 
 
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