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    I was looking to see and gain a little data on how many people will be using and (religiously) staying consistent with a study plan for all the subjects.

    Our head of sixth form said we should spend 1 hour; per day; per subject.

    Works out for me, 15 hours extra p/w. (Note, this is a lot considering I also work evenings)

    I'm going to post in Physics and Maths too, for more data.

    Post your plans please
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    It's better to do a moderate amount every week, than a stupid amount before exams.
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    (Original post by alow)
    It's better to do a moderate amount every week, than a stupid amount before exams.
    Personally, I genuinely think that it depends on your capacity for memory; as long as you understand the basics. I will have to be mindful about how much I can take in per week and then go from there I guess.

    What are you doing? Do you have a study plan?
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    (Original post by redsoules)
    Personally, I genuinely think that it depends on your capacity for memory; as long as you understand the basics. I will have to be mindful about how much I can take in per week and then go from there I guess.

    What are you doing? Do you have a study plan?
    Getting to grips with the basics takes a lot of practice though, and it's better to do that practice throughout the year than before the exams.

    I did my A Levels a few years ago, but what I did was work on the book/problems throughout the year then do past papers in the weeks leading up to the exams.
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    (Original post by alow)
    Getting to grips with the basics takes a lot of practice though, and it's better to do that practice throughout the year than before the exams.

    I did my A Levels a few years ago, but what I did was work on the book/problems throughout the year then do past papers in the weeks leading up to the exams.
    When you say Book/Problems, are you referring to a textbook that they give you, or one you found independently?

    I have some Cambridge University reading material which is Peter Atkins and Prof. Housecroft. Would that be suitable for me yet? Shall I just read it anyway?
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    (Original post by redsoules)
    When you say Book/Problems, are you referring to a textbook that they give you, or one you found independently?

    I have some Cambridge University reading material which is Peter Atkins and Prof. Housecroft. Would that be suitable for me yet? Shall I just read it anyway?
    I used the textbook made by my exam board and problems on spectra from websites.

    Which books in particular do you have? It's always good to read around a topic but there's no point reading something you won't understand.
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    (Original post by alow)
    I used the textbook made by my exam board and problems on spectra from websites.

    Which books in particular do you have? It's always good to read around a topic but there's no point reading something you won't understand.
    I see. I think our college will offer a similar sort of regime; An internal application ran by some company which lets us quiz and study whilst at home.


    Chemistry: An Introduction to Organic, Inorganic and Physical Chemistry & Atkins' Physical Chemistry, 7th Ed (newer edition is out but meh).
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    (Original post by redsoules)
    I see. I think our college will offer a similar sort of regime; An internal application ran by some company which lets us quiz and study whilst at home.


    Chemistry: An Introduction to Organic, Inorganic and Physical Chemistry & Atkins' Physical Chemistry, 7th Ed (newer edition is out but meh).
    Definitely look around for more resources, especially when you get to NMR spectroscopy as the more practice you do the better.

    The first book might be worth a read for general interest, but Atkins wont give you much value at A Level. By all means read it (and do some exercises!) if you're interested in physical chemistry but it won't really help you in your A Levels. You'll need a decent amount of knowledge of calculus to get far in Atkins too.
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    (Original post by alow)
    Definitely look around for more resources, especially when you get to NMR spectroscopy as the more practice you do the better.

    The first book might be worth a read for general interest, but Atkins wont give you much value at A Level. By all means read it (and do some exercises!) if you're interested in physical chemistry but it won't really help you in your A Levels. You'll need a decent amount of knowledge of calculus to get far in Atkins too.
    Do you recommend anything? In particular such as weblinks? Or would you just say stick to watching and learning from Khan academy?
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    (Original post by redsoules)
    Do you recommend anything? In particular such as weblinks? Or would you just say stick to watching and learning from Khan academy?
    This website is good for NMR, when you get to it: http://webspectra.chem.ucla.edu// Stick to the basic examples though as the other ones will have a lot of features which are not taught at A Level.

    If KA's videos work for you, that's great. Stick to what helps you learn. Don't just watch videos though, doing problems will be what prepares you for exams.
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    (Original post by alow)
    This website is good for NMR, when you get to it: http://webspectra.chem.ucla.edu// Stick to the basic examples though as the other ones will have a lot of features which are not taught at A Level.

    If KA's videos work for you, that's great. Stick to what helps you learn. Don't just watch videos though, doing problems will be what prepares you for exams.
    Thank you for your contribution alow
 
 
 
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