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Getting into Oxbridge for Postgraduate Study watch

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    (Original post by roxy potter)
    everyone in Maths III would (more than likely) be expected to max the quant so that wouldn't be very impressive.
    You are right, that might be a problem.
    But I doubt I would do any good with the general GRE test at all since english is not my mother tongue. (I think I would do this test only if I had to, because the results wouldn't be outstanding, I suppose)

    Now I have looked at the sample GRE maths test and it actually looks quite easy, that is, with some amount of preparation one should get very good results.
    Maybe you're right that there is no point doing the test.

    But I am asking myself - why make a test that does not
    differentiate among candidates as much as possible?
    (so that only best of the best could approach highest scores)
    I thought that differentiating candidates was the whole point of such a test.:confused:
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    Yeah, but my point is how can it differentiate between you and the other people applying to your course if they don't take it. Sure, it can differentiate between you and other graduates in general but you're being judged against fellow applicants.
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    Well I believe they should be able to compare between students'
    performance in a system they know really well (that is UK unis)
    and performance in a worldwide-recognized test.

    It's just like some undergraduate applicants do the IB (international baccalaureate) while others don't, and the admissions people somehow can compare these, since IB is a well known diploma programme.
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    I think you're deliberately missing the point, but believe what you want.
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    I think I am not missing your point, but I might have misunderstood you. (Not deliberately, so sorry if you think so).
    Anyway, thank you for your time and sharing your views, they definitely helped me.
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    Hello!

    My name is Mariano and I am from Buenos Aires, Argentina. I am studying biological sciences here in Argentina and I would be really keen on doing a master taught course at Cambridge in the future.

    Is it as hard to get into Cambridge for a postgraduate course as it is to get into an undergraduate course there ? Please give me a hand with this If you can.

    On the other hand, I would like to know If being an italian citizen (through naturalization) would be an advantage towards paying (or not) the overseas students fee or other kind of fee.

    Thank you very much
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    Well you are either very keen to study in Oxford or Cambridge. :p: I'm moving this to the correct place.
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    (Original post by maromad89)
    Is it as hard to get into Cambridge for a postgraduate course as it is to get into an undergraduate course there ? Please give me a hand with this If you can.
    Well, there are (usually) more applicants per place at undergraduate level. However, at postgraduate level, the average quality of applicants is likely to be quite a bit higher, so it's still competitive, despite the lower number of applications. It's up to your personal definition whether you consider one or the other "harder", though. I'd say it's swings and roundabouts, really...
    On the other hand, I would like to know If being an italian citizen (through naturalization) would be an advantage towards paying (or not) the overseas students fee or other kind of fee.
    Only if you've been living in Italy for the past three years, otherwise you'll be classified as an overseas student for fees purposes regardless of your Italian citizenship.
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    Ok, lots of questions! Sorry!

    I'm looking to apply for PhD's next year. However, I'll also be working as a teacher, so will only be able to attend interviews in half term holidays etc.

    Will Cambridge be able to accommodate this?

    Also, I am very confused with the PhD application process at Cambridge. At some other unis for example, you can only apply for, say, 2 PhD places and you do it from some central application centre. At others, such as UCL, just sending in a speculative CV can work.

    Can I apply for lots of PhD places at Cambridge /each college or is there a limit? What would they think of someone applying for 2 or 3 PhD places within the same college? Would they prefer you only submitted one application for one place?

    I already know one PhD which I really want to do there and it's the sole reason for me applying to Cambridge. However, there are a few others I am also interested in.

    Also, when is the ideal time to apply for autumn 2010 intake?

    Oh, and what are my chances of getting in without a 1st, but an amazing reference from the guy (ex Cambridge) who discovered the area of physics I am interested in?

    Thanks a lot in advance
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    Hi I also have a few questions, and would really appreciate any helpful replies. Please quote me if you respond.

    I'm interested in applying for a few Masters at Oxford, owing to different interests (and I do think you can have more than one).

    a) If I applied for the MSt History and MSc Social and Economic History, would it look bad/uncommitted (especially when they're processed by the same department, so they would know I'd applied for both)? They even share modules, and I would be quite happy on either course.

    b) Is there any point in me applying with my grades so far? I'm doing History at Cambridge and got 65% last year and 64% this year. I felt I worked hard, so it wasn't that I didn't do enough work, I think I was just unfortunately caught out by some arsey questions - but then that is not a valid excuse. The Masters courses I am interested in ask for marks ranging from 65 to 67. With the one that asks for 67, do they ever give offers out when you've got lower than that in the previous years, or do you have to show sustained competency and achievement?

    Many thanks.
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    (Original post by tony_ron)
    *snip*
    I can't really answer your first question much, but as regards your second, I applied from Exeter to Oxford's MSt Linguistics programme with visibly declining grades. In my first year my average was a 68, so I asked my tutors what I could do to shoot for a first the following year, followed their advice, and the next year...got a 63 average :rolleyes:

    I applied to Oxford and was asked for a good 2.1. I think I knew I was never going to get a First, owing jointly to the fact of being on joint honours (which unlike what most people think is NOT half the work of each course - more like three-quarters!), and to the disastrous decision that I took to switch to Ancient Greek, which is much harder than Latin. But despite the fact that I scuppered my chances of a First, I thought that aiming for a 65 or above (particularly with it being right between a 63 and a 68!) would be doable and within Oxford's remit of a 'good' 2.1 (irritatingly, they never specified what this meant in numerical terms and could not/refused to give an answer when I asked).

    I was awarded a 2.1 in the end, but because Exeter's transcripts are RUBBISH and don't give you your average for year 3, just giving you the overall degree classification on the final transcript, I never knew what average I managed to score in year 3 (or indeed overall - and I wasn't going to sit down and work it out owing to this being further complicated by different modules being worth different amounts etc etc). So it seems that they may be willing to see how you get on at the time, though it may depend on how transparent your original uni's transcripts are!

    Hope that helps a tiny bit.
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    (Original post by tony_ron)
    a) If I applied for the MSt History and MSc Social and Economic History, would it look bad/uncommitted (especially when they're processed by the same department, so they would know I'd applied for both)? They even share modules, and I would be quite happy on either course.
    I'm at the same stage as you, so don't take my opinions as expert.
    For the above, I don't know about History but for my MPhils and MAs I'm meant to write research proposals. These are quite involved and detailed. If you think you could write two very good and distinct proposals for both courses then hopefully that would demonstrate that you had sufficient interest in both and a plausible engaging route to take in each. If you don't think you can adequately demonstrate this for both, then just pick one. That's just how I'd approach it.

    (Original post by tony_ron)
    b) Is there any point in me applying with my grades so far? I'm doing History at Cambridge and got 65% last year and 64% this year. I felt I worked hard, so it wasn't that I didn't do enough work, I think I was just unfortunately caught out by some arsey questions - but then that is not a valid excuse. The Masters courses I am interested in ask for marks ranging from 65 to 67. With the one that asks for 67, do they ever give offers out when you've got lower than that in the previous years, or do you have to show sustained competency and achievement?

    Many thanks.
    Well where's the harm in applying? (apart from the application fee)
    As long as you've chosen enough back up courses at other departments to weave a good safety net, then why not simply go for it and see how it goes. You might be able to find good referees and write a very good application/research proposal which could partially make up for your grades.

    The only thing is that you can kiss funding goodbye with those grades, I'm pretty sure. Procuring a place is not too much of an issue (depending on how competitive the particular course is), but funding is highly competitive. A friend of mine from Trinity got a Masters place at Oxford in Politics (a specific form of it anyway) on a mid 2.1.
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    nah funding's possible (at least for esh) with a 2.i given it's through the esrc rather than the ahrc. it won't be easy, but it's not completely out of the question...
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    Thanks. Funding is not too much of a problem as I've been working almost every holiday and not spent too much of it.

    Do you have to write a research proposal even for taught courses? The courses I'm applying for do have a dissertation, but I haven't yet thought what I'd want to do it on It's more that I liked the look of the modules.
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    For my application (taught courses across the board), I just made a brief statement of my interests, rather than a full-blown research proposals. It seemed to work well, anyway, seeing as I got 3 offers out of 4.
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    I'm wondering if anyone knows what the BoGS (Cambridge) requires you to do for the on-line application - specifically about photos. Do they require you to submit them anyway like with the paper application? If so, how many do they ask you to send?
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    (Original post by tony_ron)
    Do you have to write a research proposal even for taught courses? The courses I'm applying for do have a dissertation, but I haven't yet thought what I'd want to do it on It's more that I liked the look of the modules.
    Does it not say on the department website? I would have thought this was a course-specific detail (it has been for the three MAs, MSc and MPhil I've chosen)
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    I'm tweaking my cv at the moment a bit... my grades are very good to good (equivalent to 1st to 2.1 in the UK), GPA of 3.86 in my US exchange uni (UW in Seattle)... but grade wise not much will change since i am applying before my last semester begins/gives grades out... so how could i tweak my application to even better?


    This is what i am thinking:


    1) Obviously score well in Quantitive and verbal part of GRE
    2) Gain another big econ research internship (got my first this summer) for the months ahead of the degree begin (March to August 2010) Are there better usages of the time if i want to maximize my chances?
    3) Work as a tutor for the Macro course at University of Munich in my last semester.
    4) Anything else i could do? Any quick fixes? Volunteer work? Math courses?
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    (Original post by tony_ron)
    Do you have to write a research proposal even for taught courses? The courses I'm applying for do have a dissertation, but I haven't yet thought what I'd want to do it on It's more that I liked the look of the modules.
    For the History MSt or the Economic & Social History MSt it'll be a statement of purpose.

    Copied from Ox's History department website:

    You should explain:

    -how you see the programme you are applying for as building upon your previous study, and what you hope to do with the qualifications you gain from us
    -what kinds of problems and issues you hope to engage with during the programme; what the current state of your knowledge and understanding of these is, and how you hope to advance that

    If you are a master’s applicant, you should:

    indicate what optional or advanced paper classes your are interested in taking give enough of an indication of your individual research interests to make it possible for us to identify an appropriate supervisor (note that if you subsequently change your mind about what you want to research, you will need the faculty’s approval to change your subject). We recognise that applicants for some specialist master’s training courses – especially Economic and Social History and History of Art – may not yet have sufficient discipline-specific knowledge to do that. However, if you wish to be considered for an AHRC or ESRC award you should take account of what these bodies require as a ‘case for support’.
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    (Original post by Rob L)
    1) Obviously score well in Quantitive and verbal part of GRE
    2) Gain another big econ research internship (got my first this summer) for the months ahead of the degree begin (March to August 2010) Are there better usages of the time if i want to maximize my chances?
    3) Work as a tutor for the Macro course at University of Munich in my last semester.
    4) Anything else i could do? Any quick fixes? Volunteer work? Math courses?

    5) Hunt down very prestigious referees who worship you
    6) Write a genius research proposal/statement of purpose

    I would have thought that work experience and activities are an afterthought to Oxbridge admissions - particularly for people applying straight from a prior academic course with a fresh academic history. They're pretty obsessed with the academic aspect. But that's just a guess: I think it will vary alot according to the course in question.
 
 
 

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