Getting into Oxbridge for Postgraduate Study Watch

newman24x
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#481
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(Original post by apotoftea)
A first is no guarantee that you'll get it in the same way that a 2:1 will not stop you getting in at all. A first will always help but if you've got nothing else on your 'CV' as such you may still be overlooked.
ok, normally what should be in the CV so that it will not be overlooked?

(Original post by IlexAquifolium)
Well it will definitely help. If you have, for example, published papers too that's excellent, but a first is more often than not plenty to make you a competitive candidate since they will be looking for evidence of academic achievement.
academic achievement here means?

Obviously whether it is enough will depend upon the competition and the number of places, but if you have a strong undergraduate degree you should certainly think about giving it a go and applying.
you mean a degree such as science and engineering?
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Athena
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(Original post by newman24x)
you mean a degree such as science and engineering?

No, a degree in which you've gained a good final mark. An undergraduate degree in engineering, whatever degree classification you achieve, would be useless for a Masters in, say, English...
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apotoftea
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(Original post by Athena)
Many of the social science courses at Oxford have started making offers of 68 or above for undergraduates (which for my degree was a First!) or only accept students who already have a 68 or above average. And a number of science disciplines won't look twice at you unless you have a first - it's the absolute minimum requirement (particle and theoretical physics at Cambridge might be one, I think...). Obviously this isn't true across the board - but depending on what course you're doing and how over-subscribed it is, you should look carefully at the entrance requirements, OP.
Don't tell me that because I may as well just not apply :p:

Ok so I'll rephrase - a HIGH 2:1 won't immediately block your chances

(Original post by newman24x)
ok, normally what should be in the CV so that it will not be overlooked?
Publications; any relevant practical experience; conference attendance is no bad thing; papers given (if any) etc etc
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newman24x
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(Original post by apotoftea)

Publications; any relevant practical experience; conference attendance is no bad thing; papers given (if any) etc etc

hurm would being an RA for a research company, a tutor as well as doing research project for Undergrad suffice?
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apotoftea
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(Original post by newman24x)
hurm would being an RA for a research company, a tutor as well as doing research project for Undergrad suffice?
By research project, do you mean a dissertation? If so, that won't make a difference because 99% students do them. Your mark for it will be important though.

Things like research assistants are always good
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newman24x
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(Original post by apotoftea)

Things like research assistants are always good
owh? So i should put it on the CV then. how so its important? (for motivation)
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apotoftea
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(Original post by newman24x)
owh? So i should put it on the CV then. how so its important? (for motivation)
Wider aspects of research; committed to your subject outside of academia/your degree etc
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bionic07
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This may sound silly but if they offer a brand new course, does that mean it'll be less competitive to get into than those courses which are more established and well known?
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rmn002
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(Original post by bionic07)
This may sound silly but if they offer a brand new course, does that mean it'll be less competitive to get into than those courses which are more established and well known?
It would depend on what Faculty/Department it would fall under, some are extremely popular and creating a new degree course might still be competitive.
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newman24x
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(Original post by apotoftea)
Wider aspects of research; committed to your subject outside of academia/your degree etc
would being a tutor help as well in the CV? hurm...i just tutored some students for like 1 or 2 years so don't think much to say their
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rmn002
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(Original post by newman24x)
would being a tutor help as well in the CV? hurm...i just tutored some students for like 1 or 2 years so don't think much to say their
It can only help you in my opinion.
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Craghyrax
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(Original post by bionic07)
This may sound silly but if they offer a brand new course, does that mean it'll be less competitive to get into than those courses which are more established and well known?
If the new course wasn't instantly popular then it would mean less people to a place statistically, but that would have no bearings on the level of calibre demanded by the department. If the department only had 20 people apply for the course, and five of those only had low 2.1s (or whatever they considered to be inadequate), they'd probably just take in the 15 who were of a high standard.
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bionic07
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It's African Studies. So quite a narrow pathway which I'm hoping not many people will go for (less competition!)

Despite their stating of "67 average or above" they then go on to say that the entry requirements are extremely flexible. Which gives the impression that they set the standards high to attract the best people, though they are probably more likely to be more forgiving on entry grades (as long as you get the 2.1)

Correct me if my waffle is hazardously incorrect!
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hobnob
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The MSc in African Studies isn't an entirely new course, though, is it? I'm pretty sure there was some sort of Africa-related area studies masters' degree before, because I distinctly remember shadylane, a formerly regular poster on TSR, going on about how area studies courses at Oxford were only there to make money for the university and how much better the equivalent courses at London universities which actually specialised in this sort of thing were. And that was almost three years ago. Most of her criticism was based on her bad experiences as a JYA a couple of years earlier, when she did some papers on African studies and was taught by people who normally teach masters' students (at St Antony's, I think). So there must have been at least a similar course four or five years ago. [Not that any of this matters, I suppose.]
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Craghyrax
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(Original post by bionic07)
Despite their stating of "67 average or above" they then go on to say that the entry requirements are extremely flexible. Which gives the impression that they set the standards high to attract the best people, though they are probably more likely to be more forgiving on entry grades (as long as you get the 2.1)
Perhaps that means that if you have a dazzling research proposal and astoundingly good references, they might accept someone with lower grades. As always, the only way to find out is by giving it a shot. But you might lose your £35 application fee, and make sure you apply to back ups.
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bionic07
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There is currently an MSc at Oxford, but Cambridge have just created their own MPhil (I'm not sure how that makes it that much different?)

I really want to go for Development Studies at Oxford or Cambridge, but I am worried that I'll fall flat on my face at the first hurdle (so subsequently looking at options where I have a greater chance of entry!)
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apotoftea
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(Original post by bionic07)
There is currently an MSc at Oxford, but Cambridge have just created their own MPhil (I'm not sure how that makes it that much different?)

I really want to go for Development Studies at Oxford or Cambridge, but I am worried that I'll fall flat on my face at the first hurdle (so subsequently looking at options where I have a greater chance of entry!)
SOAS would be a very good back-up
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by bionic07)
It's African Studies. So quite a narrow pathway which I'm hoping not many people will go for (less competition!)

Despite their stating of "67 average or above" they then go on to say that the entry requirements are extremely flexible. Which gives the impression that they set the standards high to attract the best people, though they are probably more likely to be more forgiving on entry grades (as long as you get the 2.1)

Correct me if my waffle is hazardously incorrect!
This very often means that they will consider people from alternative backgrounds ie those that have extensive field experience, rather than a strong academic background. People who have actually been there, seen it and done it, and want to add to or strengthen their CV by getting a degree. It is quite common in IR/Development type areas where there can be a significant body of skill and information in the practical rather than academic environment.
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hollybobs82
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(Original post by Dionis_antic)
I think it is still possible to get into Oxbridge with a high 2.1, that is, almost first as I know personally few poeple who managed to do this..

It is possible: I did it!
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rmn002
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#500
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(Original post by hollybobs82)
It is possible: I did it!
What subject/course did you apply for?
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