Getting into Oxbridge for Postgraduate Study Watch

tayesniggi
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#681
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#681
(Original post by synvilla)
I have no idea how much a 2.1 is worth, since I'm not doing my undergrad in the UK. My degree only have 2 grades, and LSE clearly says how many credits (ECTS) of the higher grade they want (absolute minimum of 90 credits at highest grade after 4 years of studies, i.e bachelor+ 1 year master) and I will have better than that (about 150-160 credits at the highest grade) during my bachelor. I'm also doing my bachelor in just over 2 years instead of 3. I haven't looked into if Oxbridge requires an master to be eligble for masters though, but I assume not since that's a very weird requirement from LSE
I'm from Slovenia so I think you can find my answer useful as they usually tend to put us in the same place. So, here it goes: LSE requirement: grade 9 (on a scale of 10) if you have 6 years of study (that would be including masters) and outstanding grades (which I translate to above 9) if you have 4 years of study (BA). I know people who applied wiht 9,2 and 9,5 after finishing their bachelor and didn't get in, but got into Oxford. Only one girl that got 9,8 (on a scale of 10!!! - almost perfect and I don't think anyone ever scored that at my faculty) at bachelor level got into LSE. Not to mention there's no requirements for those taking the new bologna programmes which are just 3 year programmes. So in the case of Slovenia to get to LSE for sure, you have to have your masters already and got good grades at it.

So yeah, Oxford's requirements are less strict for Slovenians than LSE requirements. I'd guess it's similar for Poland, but you should still try to apply to both, or try mailing them - you can try, maybe you'll have more luck, but I never heard back when I mailed them.
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synvilla
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(Original post by tayesniggi)
I'm from Slovenia so I think you can find my answer useful as they usually tend to put us in the same place. So, here it goes: LSE requirement: grade 9 (on a scale of 10) if you have 6 years of study (that would be including masters) and outstanding grades (which I translate to above 9) if you have 4 years of study (BA). I know people who applied wiht 9,2 and 9,5 after finishing their bachelor and didn't get in, but got into Oxford. Only one girl that got 9,8 (on a scale of 10!!! - almost perfect and I don't think anyone ever scored that at my faculty) at bachelor level got into LSE. Not to mention there's no requirements for those taking the new bologna programmes which are just 3 year programmes. So in the case of Slovenia to get to LSE for sure, you have to have your masters already and got good grades at it.

So yeah, Oxford's requirements are less strict for Slovenians than LSE requirements. I'd guess it's similar for Poland, but you should still try to apply to both, or try mailing them - you can try, maybe you'll have more luck, but I never heard back when I mailed them.
Thank you for your answer, but that just made me more confused I think... Basically because the grading system are so different as well. I'm getting my degree from a Swedish university, but studying to it in different countries (China and Poland). My university will recognize all my courses studied abroad and convert my grades into either "pass" or "very good". I just need to return for a thesis after this academic year, since that must be done on location.

I've applied for a second bachelor all ready though at Cambridge. Been to interviews etc, so in January I'll know if I get an offer or not. With a degree from there, I know I can get into masters mostly wherever I want as long as I have the grades... If it doesn't go well I'm also considering applying for a masters somewhere else, and then applying for a second masters at Oxbridge.
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tayesniggi
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(Original post by synvilla)
Thank you for your answer, but that just made me more confused I think... Basically because the grading system are so different as well. I'm getting my degree from a Swedish university, but studying to it in different countries (China and Poland). My university will recognize all my courses studied abroad and convert my grades into either "pass" or "very good". I just need to return for a thesis after this academic year, since that must be done on location.
Oh wow, so LSE wants masters from Swedish students as well? Well, sorry, my answer's not much help then... Try contacting them, maybe you get lucky
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hobnob
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(Original post by synvilla)
Thank you for your answer, but that just made me more confused I think... Basically because the grading system are so different as well. I'm getting my degree from a Swedish university, but studying to it in different countries (China and Poland). My university will recognize all my courses studied abroad and convert my grades into either "pass" or "very good". I just need to return for a thesis after this academic year, since that must be done on location.

I've applied for a second bachelor all ready though at Cambridge. Been to interviews etc, so in January I'll know if I get an offer or not. With a degree from there, I know I can get into masters mostly wherever I want as long as I have the grades... If it doesn't go well I'm also considering applying for a masters somewhere else, and then applying for a second masters at Oxbridge.
You realise that would be seriously expensive, though, don't you? At Oxford, the ELQ-rates for taught courses currently start at around £6,800 (with some being considerably more expensive than that), and it's bound to get worse. If you add college fees, rent and general living costs, you'll easily end up paying £20,000 for that year. Not really worth it just for the sake of having the word 'Oxford' on your CV, in my opinion...
I don't know the Cambridge rates, but they'll be in a similar range.
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tayesniggi
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(Original post by hobnob)
You realise that would be seriously expensive, though, don't you? At Oxford, the ELQ-rates for taught courses currently start at around £6,800 (with some being considerably more expensive than that), and it's bound to get worse. If you add college fees, rent and general living costs, you'll easily end up paying £20,000 for that year. Not really worth it just for the sake of having the word 'Oxford' on your CV, in my opinion...
I don't know the Cambridge rates, but they'll be in a similar range.
That depends on what you want to do and where you want to work. In some places/countries the name of the uni really counts. And the second masters might not be in exactly the same subject so she would still learn some new things, get new experience. If she can afford it... good for her and even better for the uni
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synvilla
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(Original post by hobnob)
You realise that would be seriously expensive, though, don't you? At Oxford, the ELQ-rates for taught courses currently start at around £6,800 (with some being considerably more expensive than that), and it's bound to get worse. If you add college fees, rent and general living costs, you'll easily end up paying £20,000 for that year. Not really worth it just for the sake of having the word 'Oxford' on your CV, in my opinion...
I don't know the Cambridge rates, but they'll be in a similar range.
oh wow, I had no idea that ELQ rates were for masters courses as well. With the second undergrad thing, Cambridge is letting me postpone my first graduation so I don't actually have the degree in hand when the semester starts, hence I don't have ELQ status if I get an offer from Cambridge.

in Sweden we get paid for studying regardless if we have equal degrees all ready, and it takes a while for me to get used to the whole paying for studying thing...

Now I'm simply hoping for an offer from Cambridge in Jan, if it doesn't go well I'll apply for a masters this autumn, and after that I guess I'm abandoning my Oxbridge dream.
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hobnob
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#687
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(Original post by synvilla)
oh wow, I had no idea that ELQ rates were for masters courses as well. With the second undergrad thing, Cambridge is letting me postpone my first graduation so I don't actually have the degree in hand when the semester starts, hence I don't have ELQ status if I get an offer from Cambridge.

in Sweden we get paid for studying regardless if we have equal degrees all ready, and it takes a while for me to get used to the whole paying for studying thing...

Now I'm simply hoping for an offer from Cambridge in Jan, if it doesn't go well I'll apply for a masters this autumn, and after that I guess I'm abandoning my Oxbridge dream.
Yes, I know. ELQ rates are pretty bad. Getting paid for studying sounds almost too good to be true, though (no, actually it does sound too good to be true; there's no 'almost' about it).
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tayesniggi
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(Original post by hobnob)
Yes, I know. ELQ rates are pretty bad. Getting paid for studying sounds almost too good to be true, though (no, actually it does sound too good to be true; there's no 'almost' about it).
I think what she meant is that government is paying the fees instead of them, so studying in Sweden is free. You only have to care about accommodation and food, no other fees apply.
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hobnob
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(Original post by tayesniggi)
I think what she meant is that government is paying the fees instead of them, so studying in Sweden is free. You only have to care about accommodation and food, no other fees apply.
Ah, OK, that makes a bit more sense.:p:
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synvilla
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#690
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(Original post by tayesniggi)
I think what she meant is that government is paying the fees instead of them, so studying in Sweden is free. You only have to care about accommodation and food, no other fees apply.
No, we get paid. My accommodation is covered by the money I get paid for studying. This year I get just over £5000 to cover accommodation etc. In sixth form I was paid slightly more, but now I'm taking a student loan on top of the money that I'm paid, so my finances are ok.
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tayesniggi
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(Original post by synvilla)
No, we get paid. My accommodation is covered by the money I get paid for studying. This year I get just over £5000 to cover accommodation etc. In sixth form I was paid slightly more, but now I'm taking a student loan on top of the money that I'm paid, so my finances are ok.
Uhm... ok.. sorry for giving the wrong info... but.. wow, i'm really surprised to hear that. does it apply to all the students regardless of which course you study and what your grades are? and, I assume, it applies only to Swedish citizens? How about masters, do they pay you for that one as well? (I know this is off topic, but it's interesting and maybe useful information)
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synvilla
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(Original post by tayesniggi)
Uhm... ok.. sorry for giving the wrong info... but.. wow, i'm really surprised to hear that. does it apply to all the students regardless of which course you study and what your grades are? and, I assume, it applies only to Swedish citizens? How about masters, do they pay you for that one as well? (I know this is off topic, but it's interesting and maybe useful information)
Yes, it has nothing to do with income, grades, course, level of studies etc. It's for all Swedish students, regardless of where or what we study. I for example study in Poland right now, and I studied in China before. It would also be valid for me if I get accepted to University of Cambridge, which I've applied for. The money isn't enough to cover tuition fees though, but they're offering me a loan to cover those costs.

It only applies to Swedish citizens, but they also have some kind of rule of if you've lived in Sweden for a certain amount of years (3 or 5, don't remember) you're eligble as well.

We can study whatever we want and get paid for it, however only a maximum of 6 years. And we don't have to get a degree within those 6 years etc, and we can study bachelor after bachelor after bachelor if we would feel like it... Or masters etc. However they do demand us to pass most courses, if we fail too much we temporarily lose the funding until we've had resits.

There's a debate going on right now, that students get paid for studying self-help courses like "the road to happiness" things, which has nothing to do with getting a degree in something nor working with it later. I agree that it's bizarre to pay students to study something that won't benefit the society later. Otherwise I really like the system though. As far as I'm aware all the other scandinavian countries have the same or very similar systems.
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tayesniggi
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#693
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#693
Cool. It proves once more that it's good to be a scandinavian
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balancecatcher
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(Original post by synvilla)
I agree that it's bizarre to pay students to study something that won't benefit the society later.
Haha, yeah, until someone decides art history, or archaeology, or anything to do with dead languages won't benefit society. Who decides what is beneficial? On what grounds?

It is not bizarre; it is democratic.
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synvilla
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#695
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(Original post by balancecatcher)
Haha, yeah, until someone decides art history, or archaeology, or anything to do with dead languages won't benefit society. Who decides what is beneficial? On what grounds?

It is not bizarre; it is democratic.
Yeah, but at least that is some kind of science behind it. And you actually get a degree in something. But my home country doesn't do dead languages though... And art history, archeology, literature etc etc is very unusual subjects at university level.

And it's tax payers who pay for it, why shouldn't tax payers be able to decide it's silly?
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hobnob
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#696
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(Original post by synvilla)
Yeah, but at least that is some kind of science behind it. And you actually get a degree in something. But my home country doesn't do dead languages though... And art history, archeology, literature etc etc is very unusual subjects at university level.

And it's tax payers who pay for it, why shouldn't tax payers be able to decide it's silly?
Since when? Or do you just mean literature-based courses are uncommon in Sweden?
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synvilla
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(Original post by hobnob)
Since when? Or do you just mean literature-based courses are uncommon in Sweden?
Well I clearly started the sentence with "in my home country".
so yes, in Sweden, since Sweden is my home country.
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hobnob
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#698
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(Original post by synvilla)
Well I clearly started the sentence with "in my home country".
so yes, in Sweden, since Sweden is my home country.
No, you didn't.:confused: That was the previous sentence and it wasn't clear that the bit I quoted wasn't meant as a general statement.
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synvilla
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#699
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(Original post by hobnob)
No, you didn't.:confused: That was the previous sentence and it wasn't clear that the bit I quoted wasn't meant as a general statement.
My bad, didn't mean to separate the sentences. But anyway, I think it's quite known that eng lit is a quite common subject in the UK and that you therefore could assume things from what I meant
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hobnob
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(Original post by synvilla)
My bad, didn't mean to separate the sentences. But anyway, I think it's quite known that eng lit is a quite common subject in the UK and that you therefore could assume things from what I meant
But does that mean people don't tend to study Swedish literature either?
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