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    I have been predicted A*AA in Geo, Pol, His, I am now motivated to get these, I want to have the most effective revision technique for this year.

    The one I have currently been using over the past 4 days goes like...
    1) Mark the lesson number.
    2) Write it down on a calendar in spaces of days: 1,3,7,21,30,45... (from the previous review date).
    3) Read over that lesson of work on each of these days.

    (Periodic review)

    Is there a way to make this more effective or should I be using an entirely different method?
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    (Original post by finn61)
    I have been predicted A*AA in Geo, Pol, His, I am now motivated to get these, I want to have the most effective revision technique for this year.

    The one I have currently been using over the past 4 days goes like...
    1) Mark the lesson number.
    2) Write it down on a calendar in spaces of days: 1,3,7,21,30,45... (from the previous review date).
    3) Read over that lesson of work on each of these days.

    (Periodic review)

    Is there a way to make this more effective or should I be using an entirely different method?
    Your current method satisfies the principle of 'the more you repeat the slower you forget' quite well. I cannot really fault it. Given that you are coping well without becoming overloaded and you are still making time for leisure, then go for it.


    Personally, I do Maths, Business and ICT. For maths, I usually do lots of extra work throughout the week on a mixture of the topics we have covered that week, as well as some from a while back. Business and ICT, I typically leave until the weekends.
    Over half terms, I repeat all of the content covered to date for these two subjects, with some light maths revision in between.

    This is my favourite way of doing things, and produced 90%+ in all three AS's

    The look on my teachers' faces when I handed them the big pile of work after half terms was priceless...

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by PedanticStudent)
    Your current method satisfies the principle of 'the more you repeat the slower you forget' quite well. I cannot really fault it. Given that you are coping well without becoming overloaded and you are still making time for leisure, then go for it.


    Personally, I do Maths, Business and ICT. For maths, I usually do lots of extra work throughout the week on a mixture of the topics we have covered that week, as well as some from a while back. Business and ICT, I typically leave until the weekends.
    Over half terms, I repeat all of the content covered to date for these two subjects, with some light maths revision in between.

    This is my favourite way of doing things, and produced 90%+ in all three AS's

    The look on my teachers' faces when I handed them the big pile of work after half terms was priceless...

    Good luck.
    Thank you for your reply, I got 85% in Politics and Geog (History is an internal so I didn't revise hard so got a B)

    What are some of your revision techniques?

    (Also when reviewing should I be rewriting it but as a summary?)
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    (Original post by finn61)
    Thank you for your reply, I got 85% in Politics and Geog (History is an internal so I didn't revise hard so got a B)

    What are some of your revision techniques?

    (Also when reviewing should I be rewriting it but as a summary?)
    For my two essay subjects, I do look, cover, write, check. Essentially, this is memorising the textbooks, but over time, you will find that you will have a good enough grasp of the content that you'll end up writing it in your own words and will be incorporating your own ideas into it.

    Do not make the mistake of not nailing exam technique. It's so important. You need to find out exactly what the examiners want from candidates. Rigorously practice past papers, and read the mark schemes/examiners reports to achieve this. For instance, when you are repeating the content of an area in History, go looking for some past paper questions based on that area and educate yourself on how marks are awarded. Understanding where the marks come from, and how to get them is crucial. You may have excellent knowledge, but if you don't know how to apply it effectively in an exam situation, it would all be for nothing.

    For maths and subjects like it, you literally need to practice, practice, practice.
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    (Original post by PedanticStudent)
    For my two essay subjects, I do look, cover, write, check. Essentially, this is memorising the textbooks, but over time, you will find that you will have a good enough grasp of the content that you'll end up writing it in your own words and will be incorporating your own ideas into it.

    Do not make the mistake of not nailing exam technique. It's so important. You need to find out exactly what the examiners want from candidates. Rigorously practice past papers, and read the mark schemes/examiners reports to achieve this. For instance, when you are repeating the content of an area in History, go looking for some past paper questions based on that area and educate yourself on how marks are awarded. Understanding where the marks come from, and how to get them is crucial. You may have excellent knowledge, but if you don't know how to apply it effectively in an exam situation, it would all be for nothing.

    For maths and subjects like it, you literally need to practice, practice, practice.
    I cannot thank you enough, history indeed was the reason I got a B, I need to find a better method (as I tried to do a GCSE method).

    I wish you luck in your A-levels
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    (Original post by finn61)
    I cannot thank you enough, history indeed was the reason I got a B, I need to find a better method (as I tried to do a GCSE method).

    I wish you luck in your A-levels
    No problem. Thank you.

    Remember, you don't get what you want, you get what you deserve, so work hard.
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    (Original post by finn61)
    I have been predicted A*AA in Geo, Pol, His, I am now motivated to get these, I want to have the most effective revision technique for this year.

    The one I have currently been using over the past 4 days goes like...
    1) Mark the lesson number.
    2) Write it down on a calendar in spaces of days: 1,3,7,21,30,45... (from the previous review date).
    3) Read over that lesson of work on each of these days.

    (Periodic review)

    Is there a way to make this more effective or should I be using an entirely different method?
    Hi, I'm not really one for revising since I cram, the only way I can remember all the material but I would recommend watching some of the videos by Thomas Frank on Youtube if you haven't already, he is really good. He makes videos about everything to do with revision and more!
 
 
 
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