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    Welll i don't actually do A levels, i do the IB, but the textbook we use at school is an A level one and i'm told the syllabus is practically identical to A level, but obv at A2 and not AS.

    anyway, i need to work on my French during the summer coz its a bit crappy..so any good revision guides you can recommend?

    It needs to have all the basic stuff like grammar etc. but also quite a bit of grammar because I'm useless at that.
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    I'm just about to start the AS French course and I've got this book, it seems pretty good so far.

    Edit: I just re-read your post, and realised you wanted an A2 one. Here's the same book but for A2.

    I live for Letts!
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    This might sound like a stupid question, but i don't do A levels so i don't know.

    If you're doing French for the two years, so you're doing A2 French...would you buy AS French for Year12 and then the A2 French book for Year 13?
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    (Original post by sak-y)
    This might sound like a stupid question, but i don't do A levels so i don't know.

    If you're doing French for the two years, so you're doing A2 French...would you buy AS French for Year12 and then the A2 French book for Year 13?
    Yes

    A2 is the full 2 year course, AS's are the examinations at the end of the first year (year 12).
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    Personally I'd recommend a good vocab book (I used Advanced French Vocabulary by Philip Horsfall) and a good grammar book instead. Revision guides are pretty useless at A-level. If you want to practice your skills as well, reading online newspapers or books and listening to online radio or watching TV/DVDs would be better.
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    Do you have that book handy? I doubt you do, but it would be handy to know which topics it covers coz the IB syllabus is not complectely identical to the A level one, just similar.

    What we've done so far is, Health-smoking and drinking, Racism, Immigration, The Media, Education in France and a few more but i can't think of them right now.

    Does that book cover those? Do you remember?
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    Personally I'd recommend a good vocab book (I used Advanced French Vocabulary by Philip Horsfall) and a good grammar book instead. Revision guides are pretty useless at A-level. If you want to practice your skills as well, reading online newspapers or books and listening to online radio or watching TV/DVDs would be better.
    :ditto: If you want any sort of decent grade at A-Level in a language you're going to have to take the initiative and stay away from revision guides. You have to learn vocabulary, and learn how to apply it in different situations, and so Advanced French Vocabulary is a very good choice Again, as Kelly said, a Good grammar book is a good idea too
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    (Original post by sak-y)
    Do you have that book handy? I doubt you do, but it would be handy to know which topics it covers coz the IB syllabus is not complectely identical to the A level one, just similar.

    What we've done so far is, Health-smoking and drinking, Racism, Immigration, The Media, Education in France and a few more but i can't think of them right now.

    Does that book cover those? Do you remember?
    That book covers basically every topic you want to learn about. It starts off with a Culture section, which is sub-sectioned into Literature, Film, Music and Theatre Then you have things like Politics, Education, People, Life in France etc.

    EDIT: Excuse the double post
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    (Original post by gooner1592)
    :ditto: If you want any sort of decent grade at A-Level in a language you're going to have to take the initiative and stay away from revision guides. You have to learn vocabulary, and learn how to apply it in different situations, and so Advanced French Vocabulary is a very good choice Again, as Kelly said, a Good grammar book is a good idea too

    but the Letts revision guides have long lists of vocab. in them, plus grammar sections and a CD which you can use for exam practice (with practice questions of course!)
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    (Original post by Louisdf)
    but the Letts revision guides have long lists of vocab. in them, plus grammar sections and a CD which you can use for exam practice (with practice questions of course!)
    I still think they're crap. They may have lots of vocab, but it's much better to get a good vocab book (or maybes 2) and a good grammar book. It's the only way you can ensure a high grade at A-Level
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    (Original post by gooner1592)
    I still think they're crap. They may have lots of vocab, but it's much better to get a good vocab book (or maybes 2) and a good grammar book. It's the only way you can ensure a high grade at A-Level
    :ditto: I bought the AS Letts revision guide to see what it was like and my mum bought me the A2 one because she found it really cheap in a charity shop :p: but I didn't use either of them. I guess it's quite good for factual information about France if you need to know that, but because I did Edexcel, all the reams of facts and figures were completely irrelevant and that took up most of the revision guide. Even if you do need to know things like that, you can probably find even better and more relevant, up to date stuff on the Internet. With the vocab lists, I found they were too basic really and most of the words/phrases were things you should really already know from GCSE, whereas Advanced French Vocabulary still covers all the topics you need to know, but with a wider range of vocab at a higher level. It also has some really useful essay/oral exam phrases which the Letts book doesn't have. The grammar sections were OK, but again a bit too basic really and didn't go into enough depth. The listening practice questions were nothing like what you'd be asked in the real exam.

    Wow, looks like between us, Gooner and I are really ****ging off Letts! What I've just said is only my experience and you might find the book useful, so I won't say don't buy it, but personally I definitely think that although the Letts guide is OK if you just want to pass, a good vocab and grammar book is the way to go if you want a decent grade.
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    (Original post by Vesta)
    I've also got this fat dictionary (Collins) - hardback - cost me £20 but it's pretty amazing, English-French & French-English.
    yeah I've got that as well (and also in German). It's really useful because it's got little activites in the middle of the dictionary to help you practise.
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    (Original post by naomi1111)
    yeah I've got that as well (and also in German). It's really useful because it's got little activites in the middle of the dictionary to help you practise.
    Oh does it? I didn't notice. :p: I'll try them sometime!
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    I personally used a book called 'Action Grammaire' for the grammar part (it also has some vocab but not extensively) and then the best thing I ever bought was a vocab book called 'Mot a Mot' - vocab split into topics eg. immigration, culture and the arts, travel and tourism etc - and for the exam I basically learnt the book and tried to employ as many phrases as I could - it just makes writing so much more fluent (and also, if you have 'synonym' type tasks in the exam, for example giving another way of saying a word/phrase, then it's so helpful!)

    Hope this helps!
 
 
 

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