FoxStudent
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Hello,
I am a student at Bangor University, currently studying Psychology BSc. I am thinking of taking up a masters and PhD - thus entering the academic career pathway. However, I am worried my degree in Psychology will be enough for what I want to do. I am very interested in the biological components of psychology (Neuroscience, general anatomy and even sometimes physics) and attend biological-based modules at the university. However, I have no A levels in biology or physics (only Psychology). BUT I read books about biology and have an amateur understanding of general biology and a student level of knowledge on brain physiology. I guess what I am asking is, when it comes to applying for a masters and PhD in neuroscience-based labs, will a degree in Psychology and an obvious keen interest be enough to wow my professor?
Thanks for your time.
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monkyvirus
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As long as you can link your studies to the course you should be fine. I was accepted on to a Psychology PhD with a Statistics degree (the phd is about using stats in psychology but notably I have no lab or psychology experience whatsoever).

I would definitely focus on those biology-based modules in any application.
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FoxStudent
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Thanks
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by FoxStudent)
Hello,
I am a student at Bangor University, currently studying Psychology BSc. I am thinking of taking up a masters and PhD - thus entering the academic career pathway. However, I am worried my degree in Psychology will be enough for what I want to do. I am very interested in the biological components of psychology (Neuroscience, general anatomy and even sometimes physics) and attend biological-based modules at the university. However, I have no A levels in biology or physics (only Psychology). BUT I read books about biology and have an amateur understanding of general biology and a student level of knowledge on brain physiology. I guess what I am asking is, when it comes to applying for a masters and PhD in neuroscience-based labs, will a degree in Psychology and an obvious keen interest be enough to wow my professor?
Thanks for your time.
If you do a neuroscience masters with some taught components that will definitely help. Try getting some relevant work experience in a lab over the summer. It's definitely possible.
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chazwomaq
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I don't think it will matter at all to be honest. Read a biological psychology textbook. You could do a taught masters in neuroscience or something which will teach you all you need to know.

When applying for a PhD having experience might help e.g. if you did a undergraduate or masters project in neuroscience, or worked or volunteered in a lab and so on.
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