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    First chem lesson and I get this...I have to answer some questions on an experiment we did in class. This is a copy of the sheet we have:
    https://www.scribd.com/document/1993...Gas-Collection

    Hydrogen collected was 141 ml.
    Do i do 126/24000 to get moles (moles= vol/24000)
    Or do I use this ideal gas rule we just learned? Because we also have this info: Molar gas volume is 24000cm 3 at 298K and 101kPa (RTP).
    If so, how do i actually use it?
    And then how would I go about finding its Ar?
    Thanks for any help.
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    (Original post by oshen)
    First chem lesson and I get this...I have to answer some questions on an experiment we did in class. This is a copy of the sheet we have:
    https://www.scribd.com/document/1993...Gas-Collection

    Hydrogen collected was 126 ml.
    Do i do 126/24000 to get moles (moles= vol/24000)
    Yes.

    Or do I use this ideal gas rule we just learned? Because we also have this info: Molar gas volume is 24000cm 3 at 298K and 101kPa (RTP).
    If so, how do i actually use it?
    You just did.

    And then how would I go about finding its Ar?
    Thanks for any help.
    You would need to know the mass of the gas to get the Ar.
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    (Original post by alow)
    Yes.



    You just did.



    You would need to know the mass of the gas to get the Ar.
    Ok so it was 141 ml, not 126, my bad.
    If I do 141/24000= 5.875 x 10^-3, thats my moles of hydrogen?
    Then the ration of H2 and X are 1:1, so its the same moles of metal x right?

    So that leaves this last bit you said :
    You would need to know the mass of the gas to get the Ar

    How? Also you said I just used the ideal gas rule, but how actually did I?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by oshen)
    Ok so it was 141 ml, not 126, my bad.
    If I do 141/24000= 5.875 x 10^-3, thats my moles of hydrogen?
    Then the ration of H2 and X are 1:1, so its the same moles of metal x right?
    Yes and yes. Now you know the amount of X you started with.

    So that leaves this last bit you said :
    You would need to know the mass of the gas to get the Ar
    If you need to find the Ar of the gas that's what you would need. It wasn't apparent that wasn't what you wanted. Just a tip: don't describe anything as "it" when writing about chemistry, always make it explicitly clear what you're talking about. I know this seems picky and silly, but doing this is really important, especially in exams.

    How? Also you said I just used the ideal gas rule, but how actually did I?
    Thanks
    You used 24dm3 as the volume of one mole of gas at RTP.
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    (Original post by alow)

    If you need to find the Ar of the gas that's what you would need. It wasn't apparent that wasn't what you wanted. Just a tip: don't describe anything as "it" when writing about chemistry, always make it explicitly clear what you're talking about. I know this seems picky and silly, but doing this is really important, especially in exams.



    You used 24dm3 as the volume of one mole of gas at RTP.
    I was so unclear when I used "it", didn't even realise. Thanks for the advice, I need all I can get for chem xD
    I meant the Ar of the metal x, which we used 0.19g, so I would to Ar = mass/mol?
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    (Original post by oshen)
    I was so unclear when I used "it", didn't even realise. Thanks for the advice, I need all I can get for chem xD
    I meant the Ar of the metal x, which we used 0.19g, so I would to Ar = mass/mol?
    Using "it" just makes things ambiguous sometimes, which is the last thing you want when you're writing something scientific. There are situations when using "it" is okay, but make sure what you're writing could not be confused in any way.

    That's exactly what you would do, as you now know the amount and mass of X.
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    (Original post by alow)
    Using "it" just makes things ambiguous sometimes, which is the last thing you want when you're writing something scientific. There are situations when using "it" is okay, but make sure what you're writing could not be confused in any way.

    That's exactly what you would do, as you now know the amount and mass of X.
    Sorry to keep pestering, one last thing: questions 3 and 4
    How would I show the acid was excess in moles, using Ar of X?
    If metal x was in lump form? Would you crush it into smaller pieces?

    Thank you for all your help
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    (Original post by oshen)
    Sorry to keep pestering, one last thing: questions 3 and 4
    How would I show the acid was excess in moles, using Ar of X?
    If metal x was in lump form? Would you crush it into smaller pieces?

    Thank you for all your help
    From the chemical equation you can see you need two moles of HCl for every mole of X, so all you need to do is show there is more than twice as much HCl as X.

    Yeah, I'd grind it in a mortar and pestle probably.
 
 
 
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