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    Hello,

    I have requested the script for my physics paper, and there was one question where I'm not sure whether they made a mistake or not.

    The answer in the mark scheme is: "7 (an integer)"
    My answer was "7.0"

    Should I be awarded the mark or not? (I didn't get the mark)
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    it seems very harsh to deprive you of a mark, but technically it is not an integer :cry:
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    agree with @the bear. 7 is an integer but anything with a decimal (even if it is x.0) is sadly not considered one (even though it logically is!)
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    Yes, it's an integer. (if we're talking maths)
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    7 = 7.0. How you write the number doesn't change the fact that it's an integer. But if they wanted you to understand that the answer was a whole number because of the nature of what it's describing (i.e. it's a discrete quantity), e.g. number of bounces (you can't have have 7.2 bounces), rather than by coincidence, e.g. velocity happens to be exactly 7.0 m/s from data given, then they might not
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    What was the question?
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    Same thing mathematically, but physically 7.0 might be an indication of your degree of accuracy, which might not be in context.
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    (Original post by ukcolBehT)
    Hello,

    I have requested the script for my physics paper, and there was one question where I'm not sure whether they made a mistake or not.

    The answer in the mark scheme is: "7 (an integer)"
    My answer was "7.0"

    Should I be awarded the mark or not?
    Since you've neglected to include the question; how the hell should we know?
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    more often it is the other way round... people are asked to give 2 significant figures and write 7 instead of 7.0
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    (Original post by jweo)
    7 = 7.0. How you write the number doesn't change the fact that it's an integer. But if they wanted you to understand that the answer was a whole number because of the nature of what it's describing (i.e. it's a discrete quantity), e.g. number of bounces (you can't have have 7.2 bounces), rather than by coincidence, e.g. velocity happens to be exactly 7.0 m/s from data given, then they might not
    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    What was the question?
    (Original post by EricPiphany)
    Same thing mathematically, but physically 7.0 might be an indication of your degree of accuracy, which might not be in context.
    (Original post by Profesh)
    Since you've neglected to include the question; how the hell should we know?

    The question was: "Calculate the number of electrons causing the charge on the droplet."

    The lowest number of significant figures going into the calculation was 2.
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    (Original post by ukcolBehT)
    The question was: "Calculate the number of electrons causing the charge on the droplet."

    The lowest number of significant figures going into the calculation was 2.
    I would probably agree with the examiner in this case.
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    7.0 is basically 7, so yes it is an integer
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    Since it's a physics exam, whilst harsh, I'd agree with the marker. In a scientific context, 7.0 suggests that your variable is 7.0 accurate to 2sf which means it could well not be an integer (indeed it probably isn't because you'd never write the integer 7 as 7.0 in science).
 
 
 
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