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    Applying to Oxford for Law with German Law, 2017 entry. Oxford website states that written work is not required for Law course.

    I gained top marks in A2 Lit, Lang and History coursework, plus I wrote several articles for the school newspaper last year. I feel that my written work would help me stand out, and so am disappointed that it is not deemed necessary for Law course.

    Nonetheless, I have put all of my coursework essays and newspaper articles together into a neat portfolio, which I would like to submit to the Oxford college to which I apply.

    Does anybody know whether sending extra work is possible? Would admissions tutors be willing to look at it or would they consider it an unfair breach of standard procedure? Surely I have nothing to lose - if they don't have a look at my work, they'll at least recognise me as someone who is proactive and hard working when they come to reviewing my official UCAS application?
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    Surely I have nothing to lose - if they don't have a look at my work, they'll at least recognise me as someone who is proactive and hard working when they come to reviewing my official UCAS application?
    Or they might see you as somebody who can't follow instructions.... Your top marks should be mentioned in your reference and you can talk about relevant aspects of your article-writing in your PS.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    Or they might see you as somebody who can't follow instructions.... Your top marks should be mentioned in your reference and you can talk about relevant aspects of your article-writing in your PS.
    This.
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    Thanks, but I wouldn't just send the work direct to preferred college without attaching a message along the lines of 'I realise that this is not standard procedure, but I would like you to see the quality of my written work as I feel that it will help my application.' Plus my GCSE results aren't as good as I would have liked them to be due to personal circumstances around that time, and I feel that it would be unfair if they were allowed to impact on the chances of me getting an offer.
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    Thanks, but I wouldn't just send the work direct to preferred college without attaching a message along the lines of 'I realise that this is not standard procedure, but I would like you to see the quality of my written work as I feel that it will help my application.' Plus my GCSE results aren't as good as I would have liked them to be due to personal circumstances around that time, and I feel that it would be unfair if they were allowed to impact on the chances of me getting an offer.
    Oxford has devised a system which suits them perfectly, and if they want to see written work in order to assess a candidate, then they ask for it. Trying to make them change their system just for you will not play in your favour.
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    Applying to Oxford for Law with German Law, 2017 entry. Oxford website states that written work is not required for Law course.

    I gained top marks in A2 Lit, Lang and History coursework, plus I wrote several articles for the school newspaper last year. I feel that my written work would help me stand out, and so am disappointed that it is not deemed necessary for Law course.

    Nonetheless, I have put all of my coursework essays and newspaper articles together into a neat portfolio, which I would like to submit to the Oxford college to which I apply.

    Does anybody know whether sending extra work is possible? Would admissions tutors be willing to look at it or would they consider it an unfair breach of standard procedure? Surely I have nothing to lose - if they don't have a look at my work, they'll at least recognise me as someone who is proactive and hard working when they come to reviewing my official UCAS application?
    I feel pretty confident in saying that there's practically no chance that they'd look at it. I very much doubt that admissions tutors are going to be particularly keen on spending a lot of time going through your portfolio and even more importantly, it would be totally unfair on the other applicants who have not submitted a portfolio. There is a reason why they do not ask for written work. You are of course very welcome to talk about your portfolio and your marks on your personal statement (you definitely should) but I do not think that it is a good idea to send them it. They're not going to see you as somebody who is proactive and hardworking, they're probably going to see you as somebody who can't read instructions and is desperate.

    If you're still determined to send them the portfolio then at least please email them beforehand to ask.
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    Plus my GCSE results aren't as good as I would have liked them to be due to personal circumstances around that time, and I feel that it would be unfair if they were allowed to impact on the chances of me getting an offer.
    Again, this is the sort of contextual information that should go on your reference.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I feel pretty confident in saying that there's practically no chance that they'd look at it. I very much doubt that admissions tutors are going to be particularly keen on spending a lot of time going through your portfolio and even more importantly, it would be totally unfair on the other applicants who have not submitted a portfolio. There is a reason why they do not ask for written work. You are of course very welcome to talk about your portfolio and your marks on your personal statement (you definitely should) but I do not think that it is a good idea to send them it. They're not going to see you as somebody who is proactive and hardworking, they're probably going to see you as somebody who can't read instructions and is desperate.

    If you're still determined to send them the portfolio then at least please email them beforehand to ask.
    "They're probably going to see you as somebody who can't read instructions and is desperate." Sorry but I disagree with you here; there are no specific instructions that state "do not send written work", it simply states on the Oxford website that written work is not necessarily required, plus the UCAS website states that students often seek to send extra work to universities/colleges as part of their application process. Also, wanting to stand out is not as a sign of desperation. I understand what you mean, but I'm applying with 6 A*/A grades at A Level, not DDD, and so an attempt to send extra work would surely just be sign as a sign of diligence and forethoughtfulness? Besides, even if it were to seem desperate, is that not what Oxford want? Students who are absolutely determined to study there and who are willing to do absolutely everything to get there?

    I also don't think that it would be "totally unfair on the other applicants." There is nothing that says that they can't do likewise? Surely somebody who puts in the hard work to compile a large portfolio (a portfolio which not only includes school essays and coursework, but also additional work created specifically for the purpose of an Oxford application) is more deserving of a place than somebody who doesn't? I don't mean to sound like a **** and I do understand where you're coming from, but I myself feel that sending additional work can only be a positive thing. If two people with equal credentials apply for the same job, for instance, then surely the guy who sends a 20,000 academic portfolio (or who simply goes beyond what the job advertisement specifies) is more likely to get that job, even if the employer won't look at the portfolio/refuses to look in detail at what the job applicant has done?

    And yes, I would be sending them an email beforehand - have just sent an enquiry to the university via email.
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    "They're probably going to see you as somebody who can't read instructions and is desperate." Sorry but I disagree with you here; there are no specific instructions that state "do not send written work", it simply states on the Oxford website that written work is not necessarily required, plus the UCAS website states that students often seek to send extra work to universities/colleges as part of their application process. Also, wanting to stand out is not as a sign of desperation. I understand what you mean, but I'm applying with 6 A*/A grades at A Level, not DDD, and so an attempt to send extra work would surely just be sign as a sign of diligence and forethoughtfulness? Besides, even if it were to seem desperate, is that not what Oxford want? Students who are absolutely determined to study there and who are willing to do absolutely everything to get there?

    I also don't think that it would be "totally unfair on the other applicants." There is nothing that says that they can't do likewise? Surely somebody who puts in the hard work to compile a large portfolio (a portfolio which not only includes school essays and coursework, but also additional work created specifically for the purpose of an Oxford application) is more deserving of a place than somebody who doesn't? I don't mean to sound like a **** and I do understand where you're coming from, but I myself feel that sending additional work can only be a positive thing. If two people with equal credentials apply for the same job, for instance, then surely the guy who sends a 20,000 academic portfolio (or who simply goes beyond what the job advertisement specifies) is more likely to get that job, even if the employer won't look at the portfolio/refuses to look in detail at what the job applicant has done?

    And yes, I would be sending them an email beforehand - have just sent an enquiry to the university via email.
    So why are you asking this question if you think you already know the answer? You've had three people now telling you that this isn't a good idea but if you want to ignore that because you think you know better, okay.
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    "They're probably going to see you as somebody who can't read instructions and is desperate." Sorry but I disagree with you here; there are no specific instructions that state "do not send written work", it simply states on the Oxford website that written work is not necessarily required, plus the UCAS website states that students often seek to send extra work to universities/colleges as part of their application process. Also, wanting to stand out is not as a sign of desperation. I understand what you mean, but I'm applying with 6 A*/A grades at A Level, not DDD, and so an attempt to send extra work would surely just be sign as a sign of diligence and forethoughtfulness? Besides, even if it were to seem desperate, is that not what Oxford want? Students who are absolutely determined to study there and who are willing to do absolutely everything to get there?

    I also don't think that it would be "totally unfair on the other applicants." There is nothing that says that they can't do likewise? Surely somebody who puts in the hard work to compile a large portfolio (a portfolio which not only includes school essays and coursework, but also additional work created specifically for the purpose of an Oxford application) is more deserving of a place than somebody who doesn't? I don't mean to sound like a **** and I do understand where you're coming from, but I myself feel that sending additional work can only be a positive thing. If two people with equal credentials apply for the same job, for instance, then surely the guy who sends a 20,000 academic portfolio (or who simply goes beyond what the job advertisement specifies) is more likely to get that job, even if the employer won't look at the portfolio/refuses to look in detail at what the job applicant has done?

    And yes, I would be sending them an email beforehand - have just sent an enquiry to the university via email.
    https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/grad...n-guide?wssl=1
    It's stated clearly on this page that "You should not upload documents which are not required for your course". So make of that what you will, but that sounds like they don't want your additional written work.
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    ...a large portfolio...which not only includes school essays and coursework, but also additional work created specifically...I have just sent an enquiry to the university via email.
    It would be really interesting - and genuinely helpful - if you could share the response you get.

    Meanwhile, my thought would similar to that of previous respondents. Oxford admissions tutors already get to consider about 15,000 undergraduate applications every year. For each of these, they have to read a personal statement, academic reference, statements of extenuating circumstances, and review exam marks. Every year, some bright sparks decide that they haven't enough to do, and also submit portfolios of "school essays, coursework and additional work" in support of their application. "Oh good!" is what none of those tutors say, ever.

    But I'd be happy to be proved wrong!
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    Applying to Oxford for Law with German Law, 2017 entry. Oxford website states that written work is not required for Law course.

    I gained top marks in A2 Lit, Lang and History coursework, plus I wrote several articles for the school newspaper last year. I feel that my written work would help me stand out, and so am disappointed that it is not deemed necessary for Law course.

    Nonetheless, I have put all of my coursework essays and newspaper articles together into a neat portfolio, which I would like to submit to the Oxford college to which I apply.

    I'm afraid that unsolicited testimonials on behalf of candidates and unsolicited work are not accepted as this would be contrary to the principle of fair admissions which requires that candidates are assessed by common criteria and that the procedure for applying be transparent.

    The only admissions materials selectors will consider are the UCAS application, results of admissions tests, work samples or art portfolios requested from candidates, and letters documenting extenuating circumstances submitted or verified by the school.

    You can, of course, refer to newspaper articles and similar in your Personal Statement which is read by the selectors.
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    (Original post by OxFossil)
    It would be really interesting - and genuinely helpful - if you could share the response you get.

    Meanwhile, my thought would similar to that of previous respondents. Oxford admissions tutors already get to consider about 15,000 undergraduate applications every year. For each of these, they have to read a personal statement, academic reference, statements of extenuating circumstances, and review exam marks. Every year, some bright sparks decide that they haven't enough to do, and also submit portfolios of "school essays, coursework and additional work" in support of their application. "Oh good!" is what none of those tutors say, ever.

    But I'd be happy to be proved wrong!
    Lol, thanks very much! Really useful advice!
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    Lol, thanks very much! Really useful advice!
    Do you have any idea how these bright sparks send their additional work (not saying that I'm a bright spark - I'm a hard worker.)?
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    Do you have any idea how these bright sparks send their additional work (not saying that I'm a bright spark - I'm a hard worker.)?
    I used to work as a lecturer/course director at another RG Uni, and mostly, I'd get "supplementary" emails with attachments. I never read them, but replied with a polite note saying that this wasn't required. One thing to be wary of is that this kind of application *could* be misconstrued - for example, in my day, the intention of extending correspondence with the Uni was sometimes to support a visa application rather than to secure a place on a course. In this case, the "additional submission" had the opposite effect to that intended.

    But I don't know what Oxford applicants get up to!

    I'm sure you are an entirely honest and highly motivated, hard worker. With your A level results, you should be able to follow the guidance that BrasenoseAdm posted and complete a killer application. Good luck!
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    (Original post by houston1998)
    Do you have any idea how these bright sparks send their additional work (not saying that I'm a bright spark - I'm a hard worker.)?
    Did you read what Brasenose, above, said?

    It may be worth paying attention to an answer from an actual Oxford admissions tutor...
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    (Original post by OxFossil)
    I used to work as a lecturer/course director at another RG Uni, and mostly, I'd get "supplementary" emails with attachments. I never read them, but replied with a polite note saying that this wasn't required. One thing to be wary of is that this kind of application *could* be misconstrued - for example, in my day, the intention of extending correspondence with the Uni was sometimes to support a visa application rather than to secure a place on a course. In this case, the "additional submission" had the opposite effect to that intended.

    But I don't know what Oxford applicants get up to!

    I'm sure you are an entirely honest and highly motivated, hard worker. With your A level results, you should be able to follow the guidance that BrasenoseAdm posted and complete a killer application. Good luck!
    Brilliant, thanks very much!
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    (Original post by BrasenoseAdm)
    I'm afraid that unsolicited testimonials on behalf of candidates and unsolicited work are not accepted as this would be contrary to the principle of fair admissions which requires that candidates are assessed by common criteria and that the procedure for applying be transparent.

    The only admissions materials selectors will consider are the UCAS application, results of admissions tests, work samples or art portfolios requested from candidates, and letters documenting extenuating circumstances submitted or verified by the school.

    You can, of course, refer to newspaper articles and similar in your Personal Statement which is read by the selectors.
    Right ok, thanks for your feedback.
 
 
 
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