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    How many places are there for this, anyone know? Hows the competition for spots for this course? Is it a more practical course than BSc Econ?

    Thanks
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    Anyone...?
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    They sell it as "more practical"..what this in reality means is, you do more businessy modules and less economics = less maths. That said, this could just be the first year. I dont do it, but I have a friend who does and he hates it.
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    Woah... so is it really a glorified business studies course? ... Anyone know about the popularity of it though?
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    Popularity..not very high - no where near as high as Econ.

    And just to stress that the business content might be a first year thing.
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    No it certainly isn't a glorified business studies course. It's a good course. Granted the competition for places may not be as great as for straight econ but there is significant overlap between the two degrees in terms of modules.

    Industrial econ students get a choice of whether to do maths techniques a or b, with b being the more advanced level. Straight Econ students have to choose b since A-Level maths is a prerequisite for admission. They don't do micro and macro in first year as separate modules but as a single economics 1 module. I think they also have to do Industrial Econ as a module in their first year whereas straight econ students get that as an optional module. You get scope to select optional modules in 2nd and 3rd year to suit your interests and career ambitions. It's highly regard by employers. I mean to be honest, all degrees within the Econ dept here have solid reps amongst employers.
    You could argue however that the theoretical content among the core modules is somewhat less than L100 over the 3 years.
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    (Original post by angster)
    No it certainly isn't a glorified business studies course. It's a good course. Granted the competition for places may not be as great as for straight econ but there is significant overlap between the two degrees in terms of modules.

    Industrial econ students get a choice of whether to do maths techniques a or b, with b being the more advanced level. Straight Econ students have to choose b since A-Level maths is a prerequisite for admission. They don't do micro and macro in first year as separate modules but as a single economics 1 module. I think they also have to do Industrial Econ as a module in their first year whereas straight econ students get that as an optional module. You get scope to select optional modules in 2nd and 3rd year to suit your interests and career ambitions. It's highly regard by employers. I mean to be honest, all degrees within the Econ dept here have solid reps amongst employers.
    You could argue however that the theoretical content among the core modules is somewhat less that L100 over the 3 years.
    Good stuff! Thanks for this.
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    You'll be doing just the L100 course (all the core L100 modules) with options in Industrial Economics. Of course if you don't like Industrial Economics... you're bound to not like it (but you can often request a move to the L100 pure course) I think
 
 
 
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