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    What is the best way to combat risky sexual behaviour among young people?

    A report for the British Medical Journal has concluded that sex abstinence programmes have no negative or positive impact on the rates of sex infections or unprotected sex.

    The Oxford University team reviewed 13 US trials involving over 15,000 people aged 10 to 21.

    Abstinence programmes are popular in the US. A UK branch of the US Silver Ring Thing was set up four years ago to promote sexual abstinence among young people.

    Do you have teenage children? If so, how do you address this issue with them? Do you support the Silver Ring Thing? What are the alternatives to no-sex programmes?
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    Educate kids with peer mentors who can talk on their level and discuss the worrys, questions and fears over sexual intercourse. Making sex a 'bad' thing just encourages young-people to try it.
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    That's face it, the type of people who sign up aren't going to be the ones who're going to be the ones having unprotected sex anyway...

    ...and if you think abstinence is a good idea when you're 14 you'll think it's a good idea when you're 19, and if your opinions change it's pretty easy it ignore what a stupid ring is supposed to mean and chances are you've thought about a fair bit anyway if you are the type of person who was thinking about it when you put on the ring.

    I think people should keep things like whether they what to have sex with people until they're married private, I don't want to hear about it, it doesn't make people think any differently about people (ooh she hasn't got a silver ring on - what a **** :rolleyes: ) and it's just a ridiculous idea, the only people who really think it works are over protective parents who're scared their darling daughter is going to turn into a slut.
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    Indeed, this is targetting the wrong people.
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    The worse thing you can do is try and force abstinence programs onto people as it's human nature as soon as your told not to do something you will do it anyway. At the end of the day it's up to the indivdual, so the best thing to do is to educate people and show them it's an option but don't force it onto people, and about media etc there's not alot you can do it's just how teh cultures shifted.
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    Regular culls.
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    (Original post by The Anthropologist)
    The real issue that no-one (in authority) seems to broach is that sex is marketed to and so easily accessible to kids now. In their culture sex is 'cool' because the media tell them it is. More and more inappropriate content on TV before the watershed, porn easily available on mobiles and in MTV videos, bras for 8 yr olds, Bratz dolls, Playboy merchandise for kids etc. They can't escape sexual imagery or content. That's why it's different now, when I was a kid I'd see page three and be shocked.

    Erm, weren't you a kid 3 or 4 years ago? Either you led a really sheltered life or have spent the last 16/17 years pretending to live in the 1860's. If my whole class was exposed to fairly hardcore porn the second the teacher stepped outside the classroom in my first IT lesson at 11 (thats nine years ago), i think its fairly safe to say that page three wasn't too 'shocking' for most kids. Society wasn't different when you were a kid, its been a fairly sexualised culture for decades.

    Abstinence programs are, frankly, moronic. They spout lies and propaganda in order to scare kids into staying away from sex, including lies about the fallibility of contraceptions and the effects and widespread infection rates of STDs. The craziest thing is that the 'abstinent' are turning away from vaginal sex and are partaking in anal sex, as it supposedly doesn't count as sex.


    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/21606.php
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    Abstinence-only sex education (that is sex education curricula that teaches that teenagers should simply remain abstinent and does not provide any advice on preventative measures for avoiding pregnancy and STD transmission) has a number of problems.
    • Often such curricula and their implementations are filled with misinformation about human sexuality and about contraception. Abstinence programmes often cite outdated or flawed scientific studies, often out-of-context, and often misrepresenting the current consensus view held by scientists.
    • Where those curricula abstain from discussing science, they instead present a cartoon version of human sexuality, using pop psychology tropes and other Disneyfied images of human reproduction and sexuality.
    • Often such curricula exists to promote particular, narrow theological interests - usually those of particular strains of evangelical, Protestant Christianity.
    • Due to these theological biases, the sexual relationships of non-heterosexuals is given short shrift. In a comprehensive sex education curriculum, adequate time should be given to non-mainstream sex so that, for instance, gay men can reduce the possibility of STD infection. Since such curricula teach that the ideal sexual behaviour is sex outside marriage, it is just a little discriminatory towards gay and lesbian students since they can't actually get married and thus satisfy these people's marriage kink. For those students, it is actually celibacy education.
    • Some reports have shown that abstinence-only sex education curricula often leads people to engage in risky sexual behaviour (on preview: 3232 already said it). Since a theologically-inspired gloss is presented on vaginal sex and the sacred importance of vaginal virginity is preached, often times this leads to people engaging in oral and anal sex - thinking these exempt from the taboo placed on vaginal sex. With only scant knowledge of how to perform these safely, due to the curriculum having been excised of any actual useful material, students unwittingly expose themselves to easily preventable risks.

    See this, this, this and a crap ton more that's only a Google search away.

    On a less serious note, a few months ago I found out about "purity balls". They are the new hot thing amongst the evangelical types in places like South Dakota and other well-known bastions of rationality - they are basically swanky, black tie, formal dances where fathers take their daughters on a "date" to encourage them to remain "pure". At the event, the girls stand up and pledge to Dad that they will remain sexually pure, and, in return, Dad pledges that he'll be a better father and help her protect her virginity (this implies, one presumes, that he'll go and knock the stuffing out of anyone who tries to coerce little Jane into breaking her sacred pledge). It's not all one-sided though. In a bid to remain politically correct, they now offer "Integrity Balls" (seriously, it's almost like they are begging for double entendre with all these balls) where teenage boys go on a similar date with their mothers, although it's got more of a rubbish stand-up comedy routine feel to it than a goddesses-in-posh-dresses aesthetic. (See 11[/s]25:11]my blog post)

    Surely, as much as people condemn music videos and fashion for turning young people in to highly sexualized beings, is there not some irony in the way that evangelicals focus so much on the sex life of their children? At first glance, it sounds admirable - if deluded - to keep children "pure", and it certainly is a good idea to instill in them some kind of idea that they can say "no" to sexual offers. But it gets to the point of absolute obsession and idol with these people. They look at their daughters and see this ghostly presence - their "purity". They probably think about their children's sex organs more than the children themselves!

    Of course, it isn't a binary, either-or choice between being completely non-discriminating (that's a long-winded way of saying "slut", but it's men too!) and complete abstinence. "Making choices" - for the abstinence people - is a code word for "letting [Jesus/my parents/my church] tell me what choice I must make". Sex education should be fact-based and completely honest. Truth on these things does matter.

    It really is a simple choice. You either tell teenagers the truth about human sexuality, or you lie to them for Jesus. It's an absolute tragedy that the United States has picked - in many instances - the latter. It is now the funding policy for the United States to large chunks of the developing world. Money from the U.S. government for sex education often has certain strings attached - that there must be a strong 'abstinence' component to it. If insanity is doing the same failed thing over and over, then the United States is collectively insane. Scandinavia is a living example of the effectiveness of openly telling the truth. The statistics live this out - lower teenage pregnancy rates, lower incidences of STD transmission, lower demand for abortion services. (The "lying for Jesus" model doesn't work for drugs either - a couple of billion metric tonnes of harm are done every year by spreading misinformation about drugs to young people).

    The Scandinavian model wins if it's positive social outcomes in the real world that you want. The abstinence model wins if it's the spreading of theological propaganda that you want.
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    sex abstinence programmes are about as realistic as growing wings, for the most part.
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    Sounds like something run by a bunch of 'holier-than-thou' religious nuts tbh. If people want to remain abstinent, that's up to them. Obviously, there should be education for under 16s to ensure that they fully know the risks and the law, but it is not possible, nor necessarily desirable, to force people to not have sex.
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    (Original post by Dionysus)
    Sounds like something run by a bunch of 'holier-than-thou' religious nuts tbh. If people want to remain abstinent, that's up to them. Obviously, there should be education for under 16s to ensure that they fully know the risks and the law, but it is not possible, nor necessarily desirable, to force people to not have sex.
    agreed

    better education and parents actually taking the resposibilty to talk to thier children about sex no matter how uncomfortable it is.
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    (Original post by Cadre_Of_Storms)
    agreed

    better education and parents actually taking the resposibilty to talk to thier children about sex no matter how uncomfortable it is.
    I never got the sex talk . All I got was "always use protection".
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    (Original post by mr_jr)
    I never got the sex talk . All I got was "always use protection".

    I bet you never go anywhere without your helmet, knee pads and elbow pads now, eh?
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    I don't think they are a good idea, young people will probably just ridicule the programmes more than anything!

    The fact that young people do have sex isn't going to change, therefore (IMO) a better way of combating "risky sexual behaviour" would be better education. E.g. about pregnancy/STD's etc.

    This whole issue really annoys me though. Why are so many young people so dumb when it comes to sex? It isn't difficult to use a condom!
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    (Original post by Have Your Say)
    What is the best way to combat risky sexual behaviour among young people?

    A report for the British Medical Journal has concluded that sex abstinence programmes have no negative or positive impact on the rates of sex infections or unprotected sex.

    The Oxford University team reviewed 13 US trials involving over 15,000 people aged 10 to 21.

    Abstinence programmes are popular in the US. A UK branch of the US Silver Ring Thing was set up four years ago to promote sexual abstinence among young people.

    Do you have teenage children? If so, how do you address this issue with them? Do you support the Silver Ring Thing? What are the alternatives to no-sex programmes?
    did anyoe watch that show on channel four about staying a virgin, and one of the girls said she was having a relationship with God :rollseyes:

    i think its personal choice, if you wanna have sex have it if you dont then dont. Simple. Just use a condom whats so ****ing hard about that? bleeding hell, i mean theyre friggin free in england! sos the pill, i just dont understand why there are so many teenage girls with babys and stds.. ******ing morons!
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    (Original post by unfinished sympathy)
    did anyoe watch that show on channel four about staying a virgin, and one of the girls said she was having a relationship with God :rollseyes:

    i think its personal choice, if you wanna have sex have it if you dont then dont. Simple. Just use a condom whats so ****ing hard about that? bleeding hell, i mean theyre friggin free in england! sos the pill, i just dont understand why there are so many teenage girls with babys and stds.. ******ing morons!
    :p:

    Good post there Gem, I love the excessive use of swearing!
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    :p:

    Good post there Gem, I love the excessive use of swearing!
    hey sam :ciao: its been one of those days yknow :p: :hugs: anyway its the truth :p:
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    (Original post by unfinished sympathy)
    hey sam :ciao: its been one of those days yknow :p: :hugs: anyway its the truth :p:
    ...yeah I could never have guessed

    Where have you been??? (leaving me to wonder through TSR alone lol)
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    ...yeah I could never have guessed

    Where have you been??? (leaving me to wonder through TSR alone lol)
    loving the sig

    yep ive moved so i dont get the net anymore have to pinch it from my mum and dad
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    (Original post by unfinished sympathy)
    loving the sig

    yep ive moved so i dont get the net anymore have to pinch it from my mum and dad
    yeah, its cool isnt it!

    thats so dry - I take it that you have a wireless thing going on? Naughty girl.
 
 
 
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