Urgent!: Applying to a doctoral program in the States during a one year MSc in the UK

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone,

    I'm of Indian nationality and citizenship and I'll be starting my MSc in Molecular Medicine at Imperial College London in September 2017. At the time of entry into the MSc, two years would have passed since I finished my undergrad at Exeter, doing internships and projects etc.

    As a result of this two year gap I'd like to start a PhD ideally in the States immediately after I come out of my MSc.

    Will this be possible if my MSc at Imperial is a one year course? I'd have to start applying almost as soon as the MSc starts?

    It's eating me up and I'd appreciate your thoughts!

    -Yusman
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yusman)
    Hi everyone,

    I'm of Indian nationality and citizenship and I'll be starting my MSc in Molecular Medicine at Imperial College London in September 2017. At the time of entry into the MSc, two years would have passed since I finished my undergrad at Exeter, doing internships and projects etc.

    As a result of this two year gap I'd like to start a PhD ideally in the States immediately after I come out of my MSc.

    Will this be possible if my MSc at Imperial is a one year course? I'd have to start applying almost as soon as the MSc starts?

    It's eating me up and I'd appreciate your thoughts!

    -Yusman
    That's the standard in the UK anyway. Ii don't know if the US expect anything different, but the majority of people who want to go on to a PhD will be making their applications in the first term of their Masters.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    That's the standard in the UK anyway. Ii don't know if the US expect anything different, but the majority of people who want to go on to a PhD will be making their applications in the first term of their Masters.
    I thought so, surely that's how everyone manages? - but I've heard some people saying that one ought to take a year out (which I don't want to do) to make a stronger application
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yusman)
    I thought so, surely that's how everyone manages? - but I've heard some people saying that one ought to take a year out (which I don't want to do) to make a stronger application
    That's how everyone manages. You could take a year out, useful if you have plans to earn money during the year, but otherwise pulling your application together in that first term, maybe sitting on it over Christmas and submitting in Jan, is entirely the norm.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    That's how everyone manages. You could take a year out, useful if you have plans to earn money during the year, but otherwise pulling your application together in that first term, maybe sitting on it over Christmas and submitting in Jan, is entirely the norm.
    That's good to know. I mean I won't have my final marks/much to report on my project/publication (my course has a 6 month research project which starts in term 2) but they can't expect everyone to be enrolled in a two year program. *Sigh* the States colleges are so demanding!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yusman)
    Hi everyone,

    I'm of Indian nationality and citizenship and I'll be starting my MSc in Molecular Medicine at Imperial College London in September 2017. At the time of entry into the MSc, two years would have passed since I finished my undergrad at Exeter, doing internships and projects etc.

    As a result of this two year gap I'd like to start a PhD ideally in the States immediately after I come out of my MSc.

    Will this be possible if my MSc at Imperial is a one year course? I'd have to start applying almost as soon as the MSc starts?

    It's eating me up and I'd appreciate your thoughts!

    -Yusman
    Hi Yusman

    For the most part, this should not be a problem; most US PhD programs accept applicants straight from their undergrad degrees. So, to them, you not having completed a Master's program is not really an issue.

    That said, if you have weak(er) undergrad results, then you might want to think about delaying an application until you have strong Master's grades to show, and/or can get strong references from your Master's program. That is what I chose to do (having a 2:1 for undergrad, I didn't think I'd be very competitive without strong Master's grades).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by madamemerle)
    Hi Yusman

    For the most part, this should not be a problem; most US PhD programs accept applicants straight from their undergrad degrees. So, to them, you not having completed a Master's program is not really an issue.

    That said, if you have weak(er) undergrad results, then you might want to think about delaying an application until you have strong Master's grades to show, and/or can get strong references from your Master's program. That is what I chose to do (having a 2:1 for undergrad, I didn't think I'd be very competitive without strong Master's grades).
    I'm facing the same issue as you are. Technically they do accept undergrads but the real workings seem to be a lot more demanding (normal profile is someone who has won some sort of an academic award, has been published, and has a first) which is why I was worried. So did you wait a year between your Masters and PhD?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yusman)
    Hi everyone,

    I'm of Indian nationality and citizenship and I'll be starting my MSc in Molecular Medicine at Imperial College London in September 2017. At the time of entry into the MSc, two years would have passed since I finished my undergrad at Exeter, doing internships and projects etc.

    As a result of this two year gap I'd like to start a PhD ideally in the States immediately after I come out of my MSc.

    Will this be possible if my MSc at Imperial is a one year course? I'd have to start applying almost as soon as the MSc starts?

    It's eating me up and I'd appreciate your thoughts!

    -Yusman
    I think you should also pay attention on the start dates to avoid an overlap of courses. I'm not sure but if your Ms ends in September meaning that the board of examiners meets in October to make a decision upon your award and the start of a phd in September, the question here would be if you can start a phd without being officially awarded a master.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by agrew)
    I think you should also pay attention on the start dates to avoid an overlap of courses. I'm not sure but if your Ms ends in September meaning that the board of examiners meets in October to make a decision upon your award and the start of a phd in September, the question here would be if you can start a phd without being officially awarded a master.
    Oh man I hadn't even considered that! Yes it's a 12 month course so I assume it will go on till the September of the following year - you make a valid (and worrying!) point. I'll have to starting pinpointing doctoral programs I want to apply to and figure out start dates/get emailing the admissions office about this. Thanks for your input!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yusman)
    Oh man I hadn't even considered that! Yes it's a 12 month course so I assume it will go on till the September of the following year - you make a valid (and worrying!) point. I'll have to starting pinpointing doctoral programs I want to apply to and figure out start dates/get emailing the admissions office about this. Thanks for your input!
    You're welcome. You can also consider those programs that start in January.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yusman)
    I'm facing the same issue as you are. Technically they do accept undergrads but the real workings seem to be a lot more demanding (normal profile is someone who has won some sort of an academic award, has been published, and has a first) which is why I was worried. So did you wait a year between your Masters and PhD?
    Yes, I applied at around the time I received my results (my degree was September -September, so I got my dissertation results in November and applied in December). I do think it helped a lot to be able to show a distinction at MA. It wasn't quite a year between finishing my MA and moving to the US since I arrived at the beginning of August the following year. That said, I had a job that I was working full time throughout my Master's, so I had that to continue with for that 10 month period and I didn't need to search for work, which made it very feasible for me to do it that way.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yusman)
    Oh man I hadn't even considered that! Yes it's a 12 month course so I assume it will go on till the September of the following year - you make a valid (and worrying!) point. I'll have to starting pinpointing doctoral programs I want to apply to and figure out start dates/get emailing the admissions office about this. Thanks for your input!
    In the US this shouldn't be a problem, since offers are not conditional. They are simply offers and you either have a place or you don't.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    thegradcafe.com is a good meeting place for people (mostly Americans) considering doctoral programs. You may find other sites that are more specific to your interests.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by agrew)
    You're welcome. You can also consider those programs that start in January.
    Yes that's what Ill probably end up doing if the starting right away plan works.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by madamemerle)
    Yes, I applied at around the time I received my results (my degree was September -September, so I got my dissertation results in November and applied in December). I do think it helped a lot to be able to show a distinction at MA. It wasn't quite a year between finishing my MA and moving to the US since I arrived at the beginning of August the following year. That said, I had a job that I was working full time throughout my Master's, so I had that to continue with for that 10 month period and I didn't need to search for work, which made it very feasible for me to do it that way.
    That makes sense. I'm worried about taking a year out as getting a job in the UK (as a non-EU international person) with all the visa business is getting more complicated to the extent of being almost impossible. I suppose I could always come back to India for that year, and make my application to the States.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Camilli)
    thegradcafe.com is a good meeting place for people (mostly Americans) considering doctoral programs. You may find other sites that are more specific to your interests.
    I'll check it out, thanks for the info!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by madamemerle)
    In the US this shouldn't be a problem, since offers are not conditional. They are simply offers and you either have a place or you don't.
    Which doctoral program did you apply for in the States?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yusman)
    Which doctoral program did you apply for in the States?

    Discipline? I applied to a variety of humanities programs, because my research is interdisciplinary. I ended up in an English Department, which is what my undergrad degree is in. I applied all over - 7 schools in the States and 3 in Canada; and I appliedacross the rankings, I was looking for a good fit and supervisors, and not necessarily a particular rank.

    As far as January intakes go: I've noticed that very few schools do a January start in the US, and those that do tend not to be fully funded programs, or tend to be less well thought of programs (the two things often go hand in hand). It may be different in your field, but that's what I've noticed in the humanities. For instance, I just searched BU's admissions, they have a Molecular Medicine PhD program, and it looks like they only accept Spring admissions for the shorter, more industry-related courses, not for PhDs: http://www.bumc.bu.edu/gms/admissions/
 
 
 
Write a reply… Reply
Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: September 25, 2016
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Poll
Which is the best season?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.