UK medicine graduate from a top uni + passed f1/f2 practising in US?

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    I understand it is competitive, however, is it possible for a UK medicine graduate from a top UK university[oxbridge , ul imperial], having also completed f1 and f2, done a BSC year, and passed the USMLE'S to apply for something which is not regarded as all-too competitive, such as family medicine in the US?

    I understand other specialites, or more competitive specialites may be more difficult, but given the growind and dire shortages of primary car physicians in paticular, especially in the US, is it there a reasonable chance?
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    anyone?
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    With respect, please be patient! *You are asking a niche question that not many people will have experience of or know the answer to. *Most of us on this forum only have experience of training / working in the UK.

    What makes you want to work in the US? *Are you a medical student, or an applicant? *My understanding is that it is very difficult to get on to a US residency programme with non-US qualifications. *But not impossible. *I believe it is valuable to have some US experience such as US-based elective. *Hopefully someone else who has looked into it further might be able to give you some more detailed information - it's not something I've ever looked into.*
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    (Original post by junior.doctor)
    With respect, please be patient! *You are asking a niche question that not many people will have experience of or know the answer to. *Most of us on this forum only have experience of training / working in the UK.

    What makes you want to work in the US? *Are you a medical student, or an applicant? *My understanding is that it is very difficult to get on to a US residency programme with non-US qualifications. *But not impossible. *I believe it is valuable to have some US experience such as US-based elective. *Hopefully someone else who has looked into it further might be able to give you some more detailed information - it's not something I've ever looked into.*
    Apologies, i should have been more patient and thank you for your answer.

    I think instead of a residency program, i meant afyer fy1 and fy2.

    So it's a little like this:

    1. Graduate from a top Medical School.
    2. Do a BSC, get research papers
    3. Possibly do an elective in the US / an attachment there.
    4. Do FY1, and FY2 here in the UK, rather than the US. So you are a proper qualified doctor before you apply to the US.
    5. Do the needed USMLE'S and get decent marks on them.


    About me:

    I'm a medical studentat a traditionalmedical school in the UK, and one that is recognised in the US [brand name]. I'm almost done with it barring a few years.
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Apologies, i should have been more patient and thank you for your answer.

    I think instead of a residency program, i meant afyer fy1 and fy2.

    So it's a little like this:

    1. Graduate from a top Medical School.
    2. Do a BSC, get research papers
    3. Possibly do an elective in the US / an attachment there.
    4. Do FY1, and FY2 here in the UK, rather than the US. So you are a proper qualified doctor before you apply to the US.
    5. Do the needed USMLE'S and get decent marks on them.


    About me:

    I'm a medical studentat a traditionalmedical school in the UK, and one that is recognised in the US [brand name]. I'm almost done with it barring a few years.
    You would still need to do residency over there - that's what they call specialist training. You couldn't just walk into a family practice job any more than you could walk into a fully-qualified GP job over here straight out of FY2. What you would avoid is having to do an internship over there.

    I'd imagine it's doable, especially if you're willing to work in less desirable areas of the country. But most of us are UK-based doctors/students so you might be better asking this on a US forum?
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    You would still need to do residency over there - that's what they call specialist training. You couldn't just walk into a family practice job any more than you could walk into a fully-qualified GP job over here straight out of FY2. What you would avoid is having to do an internship over there.

    I'd imagine it's doable, especially if you're willing to work in less desirable areas of the country. But most of us are UK-based doctors/students so you might be better asking this on a US forum?
    Thanks, i'll also try a US forum but was wondering if any UK doctors had done this or knew someone who had.

    Any idea if American doctors get annual leave?

    Ideally, i'd love a system where i can take off five days every two months - and join it with the weekends. So , fly from the US on saturday early, land on saturday, have that day, plus sunday, then the week, followed by the saturday, and fly off again on sunday.

    So really i sort of have 9 days off, rather than merely five.

    I'd like to practise Family Medicine there, which is one of the least competitive specialties.
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Thanks, i'll also try a US forum but was wondering if any UK doctors had done this or knew someone who had.

    Any idea if American doctors get annual leave?

    Ideally, i'd love a system where i can take off five days every two months - and join it with the weekends. So , fly from the US on saturday early, land on saturday, have that day, plus sunday, then the week, followed by the saturday, and fly off again on sunday.

    So really i sort of have 9 days off, rather than merely five.

    I'd like to practise Family Medicine there, which is one of the least competitive specialties.
    I imagine they get some, but AL entitlements in the USA are generally much less than we get, and you may not be able to choose when to take it, so I think 6 weeks' worth of visits home might be unlikely.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    I imagine they get some, but AL entitlements in the USA are generally much less than we get, and you may not be able to choose when to take it, so I think 6 weeks' worth of visits home might be unlikely.
    Do you think if i chose a fairly uncompetitive speciality, like family medicine, i would get better working hours and a decent shot at getting a residency?

    I was actually wondering , how i would apply while doing f1/f2?

    Could i apply to posts both in the UK and the US and see if i get one here/there ?
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Do you think if i chose a fairly uncompetitive speciality, like family medicine, i would get better working hours and a decent shot at getting a residency?

    I was actually wondering , how i would apply while doing f1/f2?

    Could i apply to posts both in the UK and the US and see if i get one here/there ?
    I'm afraid I really have no idea, it's not something I've researched at all. I don't know if AL entitlement varies between specialties, though the general hours are probably better in family medicine than other areas (but do remember that only a few years ago they had to fight to get a legal cap put on junior doctors' hours at 80 per week, compared with our 48). You could certainly apply while doing your foundation jobs, but how and when I don't know.
 
 
 
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