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    started alevels have you got any TIPS FOR THE YEAR??
    what do you regret not doing and what do you think is really important to do while studying??
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    So, I've finished my A levels this year and have a confirmed place for university next year (2017) for Dentistry.
    I'll give general advice although as I'm not sure what you're studying, I'll try to be as helpful as I can.
    For History, I frequently recorded myself stating facts and playing them back whenever I had a moment - If stored onto your phone you can pretty much play it back whenever without worrying about bringing your books all the time. Also, I gave myself a time limit and listed as many things to do with the topic as possible - preferably in chronological order. Biology and Chemistry revision, however, mainly consisted of past papers - learning the language of examiners is key for the science subjects. Although, many of my friends created posters and found that to be an efficient method. Another study technique is to try and teach somebody else - it refreshes you and whoever you're teaching!
    Other general tips? Work hard but take time off. It's okay to feel overwhelmed but it's not okay to not try to resolve it - although, if you can't control it, don't panic. Keep a photo or motivating sentence to keep you focused on your goals for after A levels - I kept a background of Bristol university's logo on my phone's home screen and a timetable as its lock screen.
    I personally don't regret anything because I found myself engrossed in work and kept the motivation. Other people in my sixth form college fell behind with some work and then found it difficult to keep up with the speed of lessons.

    Hopefully that's helped in some way!
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    (Original post by Crown-ing_glory)
    So, I've finished my A levels this year and have a confirmed place for university next year (2017) for Dentistry.
    I'll give general advice although as I'm not sure what you're studying, I'll try to be as helpful as I can.
    For History, I frequently recorded myself stating facts and playing them back whenever I had a moment - If stored onto your phone you can pretty much play it back whenever without worrying about bringing your books all the time. Also, I gave myself a time limit and listed as many things to do with the topic as possible - preferably in chronological order. Biology and Chemistry revision, however, mainly consisted of past papers - learning the language of examiners is key for the science subjects. Although, many of my friends created posters and found that to be an efficient method. Another study technique is to try and teach somebody else - it refreshes you and whoever you're teaching!
    Other general tips? Work hard but take time off. It's okay to feel overwhelmed but it's not okay to not try to resolve it - although, if you can't control it, don't panic. Keep a photo or motivating sentence to keep you focused on your goals for after A levels - I kept a background of Bristol university's logo on my phone's home screen and a timetable as its lock screen.
    I personally don't regret anything because I found myself engrossed in work and kept the motivation. Other people in my sixth form college fell behind with some work and then found it difficult to keep up with the speed of lessons.

    Hopefully that's helped in some way!
    this was amazing thanks for your tips

    do you think i should start revising and making notes right now and as i learn new things?
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    (Original post by D.SHA64)
    started alevels have you got any TIPS FOR THE YEAR??
    what do you regret not doing and what do you think is really important to do while studying??
    Hi!
    I've just finished my A levels too and I've got a place in University for Psychology. One thing I regretted would be not voicing out my own opinions in class. It is important to interact with the teachers in class to ask questions and to answer them. It was only until the later part of the semester when I started interacting with the teachers. Another thing would be that you shouldn't be afraid to aim high when it comes to choosing Universities later on.
    Consistent revision is important; just a few hours of studying each day so you don't have to cram when you are nearing the examinations. Read the mark schemes!!! I can't stress how important it is to read the mark schemes because the mark schemes tell you what the examiners are looking out for! Also, once you have finished your preparations, do all the past papers you can get your hands on so you can familiarise yourself with the paper and try to complete the papers within the time limit. Most of my friends did not practice completing the paper in the set time and so they had problems during the actual exam because they did not have enough time to complete it.
    When studying, listen to music that don't have lyrics in them because the lyrics may distract you or even better, don't listen to music at all!
    You can do it!!!
    -Gabrielle
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    (Original post by D.SHA64)
    this was amazing thanks for your tips

    do you think i should start revising and making notes right now and as i learn new things?
    Definitely points for enthusiasm for you! I can confidently say, that's the attitude that reaches the highest grades.
    Personally, when I was doing my A levels, I preferred revising consistently as I went along so that I had long term memory of the course content. It's never too early in my opinion. Although, at my sixth form college, some students thought revising in march was too early. I think there's a balance and as long as you feel confident with the speed of the course, go with what you think suits you. I'm confident you'll figure it out yourself.
    I never made a study plan and still achieved high grades; I honestly suggest that you do whatever you feel is right. If you have a gut feeling that you should be revising a specific subject instead of prioritising another, follow that instinct!
    Plus, I found that music definitely helped me! Check yourself to see if you work better with lyrics, without lyrics or with no music at all. I'd personally advise trying each at least once or twice though - especially if you've got nearly a whole year before exams! (the link below is linked to something on music and studying that I saw on the news around the time of my exams.)
    Although, I found assigning one song with lyrics to a specific sub topic of a subject allowed me to subconsciously revise - just hearing the song makes you think of the content, honestly! (Especially if the lyrics are similar to the theme, eg. Agression, Assistance, etc.)
    My best example would be 'Bad blood' by Taylor Swift for the relationship between America and Russia during the cold war.
    Although I could sing along and still revise while mind mapping on paper, you can't have a mini-rave; make sure the song isn't too catchy.

    https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...ou-concentrate

    Give me a shout if you've got any more questions, on this thread or not and I'll happily try to help!
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    (Original post by crown-ing_glory)
    definitely points for enthusiasm for you! I can confidently say, that's the attitude that reaches the highest grades.
    Personally, when i was doing my a levels, i preferred revising consistently as i went along so that i had long term memory of the course content. It's never too early in my opinion. Although, at my sixth form college, some students thought revising in march was too early. I think there's a balance and as long as you feel confident with the speed of the course, go with what you think suits you. I'm confident you'll figure it out yourself.
    i never made a study plan and still achieved high grades; i honestly suggest that you do whatever you feel is right. If you have a gut feeling that you should be revising a specific subject instead of prioritising another, follow that instinct!
    Plus, i found that music definitely helped me! Check yourself to see if you work better with lyrics, without lyrics or with no music at all. I'd personally advise trying each at least once or twice though - especially if you've got nearly a whole year before exams! :d (the link below is linked to something on music and studying that i saw on the news around the time of my exams.)
    although, i found assigning one song with lyrics to a specific sub topic of a subject allowed me to subconsciously revise - just hearing the song makes you think of the content, honestly! (especially if the lyrics are similar to the theme, eg. Agression, assistance, etc.)
    my best example would be 'bad blood' by taylor swift for the relationship between america and russia during the cold war.
    Although i could sing along and still revise while mind mapping on paper, you can't have a mini-rave; make sure the song isn't too catchy.

    https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...ou-concentrate

    give me a shout if you've got any more questions, on this thread or not and i'll happily try to help! :h
    thanks for your help:d
 
 
 
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