Salary Aims Watch

Cortez
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#101
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#101
(Original post by HagerVor)
Just under the threshold for being a higher rate tax payer.
hmm why? Seems ridiculous to me. Yeah you pay more tax on the bit over the threshold but you're still going to be taking home more money above it than you would under it.
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loopymeg
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#102
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#102
(Original post by All at once)
All these people with the romantic ideas of thinking they'll be happy earning minimum wage doing "something they love" are really bull****ting themselves.
How strange, considering that I'm currently living on a student budget and I couldn't be happier. I have a home, and I can afford to eat. I can afford to go out when I want to, and it's still quite easy to find enough for a new computer upgrade, and to add to my ISA. It's not hard to have a good living off little money, as long as you're clever about your spending. That, and I don't really have many additional "needs" to eat up my money.
What I'm saying is: If I'm happy on a low income as a student, then there's no reason to suddenly change my mind once I've graduated.


(Original post by mizzy87)
Just my opinion, but I think it's also quite a selfish stance to take if you're planning on having kids and starting a family in the future - wouldn't you want to give your family a decent and comfortable life instead of just scraping by because you chose to settle for a low wage for doing 'something that you love'. I'm not going through uni and having high ambitions of a well paid job just so I can buy myself designer handbags for the rest of my life - it's so that when I do settle down and start my own family, they'll be looked after and I'll be able to provide my kids a better childhood than I had when I was younger.
Ahh, but it's quite simple - if you can't afford to support a family, then either get a higher paying job or just don't have kids.
However, my family was raised on a low income, and - believe it or not - we've been very happy, and we never had to go without any essentials. Sure, we never had the money to go on expensive holidays or buy any luxury items, but to be honest I don't think I would have appreciated them enough as a kid. At the end of the day, while we may have moaned at the time about not being able to afford the school trip to Italy or something, I'm now thankful that my mother imposed limits on us - even though it wasn't without reason.
And no, I wouldn't want to give my kids a "comfortable" life if it meant that I'd end up spoiling them by giving them unnecessary crap just because they say "Mum, item X is really cool and I want one!". I'm not going to begrudge them any real necessities, or the occasional creature comfort - call me harsh if you like, but I don't believe in spending money just because it's there.
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la fille danse
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#103
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#103
How strange, considering that I'm currently living on a student budget and I couldn't be happier. I have a home, and I can afford to eat. I can afford to go out when I want to, and it's still quite easy to find enough for a new computer upgrade, and to add to my ISA. It's not hard to have a good living off little money, as long as you're clever about your spending. That, and I don't really have many additional "needs" to eat up my money.
What I'm saying is: If I'm happy on a low income as a student, then there's no reason to suddenly change my mind once I've graduated.

But presumably you're living in a rented houseshare as a student, and when you're 50 years old, you probably wouldn't want to be living in the same situation, would you?
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samba
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#104
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#104
Dunno, just enough to be comfortable I guess. I've no real concrete aimt....house, cars, boat, holiday once in a while and I'll be happy . I'd like to be able to qualify for natwest private banking next year, as I missed the threshold this year.
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#105
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#105
(Original post by mizzy87)
Just my opinion, but I think it's also quite a selfish stance to take if you're planning on having kids and starting a family in the future - wouldn't you want to give your family a decent and comfortable life instead of just scraping by because you chose to settle for a low wage for doing 'something that you love'. I'm not going through uni and having high ambitions of a well paid job just so I can buy myself designer handbags for the rest of my life - it's so that when I do settle down and start my own family, they'll be looked after and I'll be able to provide my kids a better childhood than I had when I was younger.

That's crazy, you're living your life so that you can make someone else's better? What about you? Why sacrifice your own life just because you had a hard childhood? Surely its now time for you to truly think of yourself and make up for the bad experience you had as a child, now that you finally have control over your own life and can start doing what you want to make your life as good as it can be. It seems a bit of a waste of a life to simply live your life in order to provide for the next generation. Its your life, not your imaginary kids, so bloody enjoy it. It doesn't last long.
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Clubber Lang
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#106
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#106
(Original post by 3232)
That's crazy, you're living your life so that you can make someone else's better? What about you? Why sacrifice your own life just because you had a hard childhood? Surely its now time for you to truly think of yourself and make up for the bad experience you had as a child, now that you finally have control over your own life and can start doing what you want to make your life as good as it can be. It seems a bit of a waste of a life to simply live your life in order to provide for the next generation. Its your life, not your imaginary kids, so bloody enjoy it. It doesn't last long.
While I agree with that I still think its unfair/selfish to have a child if you cannot support them PROPERLY - saying that, you don't have to be mega loaded to give a child decent upbringing. And its better than bringing them up when you are mega rich (and a poor parent) and making them spoilt brats
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#107
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#107
(Original post by Clubber Lang)
While I agree with that I still think its unfair/selfish to have a child if you cannot support them PROPERLY - saying that, you don't have to be mega loaded to give a child decent upbringing. And its better than bringing them up when you are mega rich (and a poor parent) and making them spoilt brats

True, but then children are something to enhance your life. They aren't something to dedicate the whole course of your life to. Its not like you went to secondary school in order to provide for your children in the future, or you bought a T-Shirt that cost £5 instead of £10 just so that you can save a little more money for your kids. There comes a point where you have to live for yourself and actually enjoy life, rather than simply do every action as part of the plan of maximising the life of any potential children.

And yes, it is a little selfish to have a child without being able to support them, but lets face it, we're on a forum full of students going to university. That's not a very likely outcome is it? And taking 5-10 years to actually do something that you love is not going to absolutely destroy any prospect of earning a decent wage afterwards, or that by doing something you love for little amounts of money that it won't lead to a higher paid job. I just don't understand the mentality of forgoing your own life in order to maximise the potential of the next life in line, there probably isn't a parent in the country that didn't live their life for themselves at somepoint, and if there is, then they sure as hell regret it or end up resenting their children.
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Clubber Lang
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#108
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#108
(Original post by 3232)
True, but then children are something to enhance your life. They aren't something to dedicate the whole course of your life to. Its not like you went to secondary school in order to provide for your children in the future, or you bought a T-Shirt that cost £5 instead of £10 just so that you can save a little more money for your kids. There comes a point where you have to live for yourself and actually enjoy life, rather than simply do every action as part of the plan of maximising the life of any potential children.

And yes, it is a little selfish to have a child without being able to support them, but lets face it, we're on a forum full of students going to university. That's not a very likely outcome is it? And taking 5-10 years to actually do something that you love is not going to absolutely destroy any prospect of earning a decent wage afterwards, or that by doing something you love for little amounts of money that it won't lead to a higher paid job. I just don't understand the mentality of forgoing your own life in order to maximise the potential of the next life in line, there probably isn't a parent in the country that didn't live their life for themselves at somepoint, and if there is, then they sure as hell regret it or end up resenting their children.
1) Not everyone sees it like that..

2) Well quite a few people are parents on here and I have read various other desires to have children soon

3) The easy solution is to just delay children til you are a lot older - i.e by the time you are 35 you might have a lot more money so can naturally support them better anyway.

Though personlly I rather wouldn't be near on 55 by the time my child hits 18 - can't win really :rolleyes:
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#109
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#109
(Original post by Clubber Lang)
2) Well quite a few people are parents on here and I have read various other desires to have children soon

You've misunderstood, i meant that as university students we are more likely to be in employment and more likely to have higher wages than the average. We're also much less likely to be long-term unemployed. Therefore the prospect of being on the breadline, unable to support children is unlikely. Taking a career path which starts off with low pay still means that you have a job and are therefore able to support a child, there are many unemployed people who manage to support their children on much less money.
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loopymeg
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#110
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#110
(Original post by more adventurous)
But presumably you're living in a rented houseshare as a student, and when you're 50 years old, you probably wouldn't want to be living in the same situation, would you?
I'd be more than happy to live in a shared house for the next 20 years, to be honest. Although there is the possibility that at some point I may settle down with a partner, and so it would be a house split between two incomes, rather than just the one. When I get closer to retirement age, if I'm single then I'll probably be looking towards a small flat or bedsit somewhere.

I can understand that not everybody is happy to live on a budget, but it's something that I've done all of my life, and so it doesn't bother me at all. This seems to be hard for some people to comprehend, but I'm very happy with my style of living, and so I see no desperate need to accept a highly paid boring job over a more enjoyable one which would pay a bit less.
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Clubber Lang
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#111
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#111
(Original post by more adventurous)
But presumably you're living in a rented houseshare as a student, and when you're 50 years old, you probably wouldn't want to be living in the same situation, would you?
A flatshare prob costs around £70-80 right?

You can easily find the same in a 'normal' household after Uni.

Even then you could probably rent an entire flast for a bit extra - but obviously you will have extra income from FT work as well so its not all that bad..
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la fille danse
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#112
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#112
What do you mean a 'normal' household?

I only know about London, but most students pay about 100-120 for a flatshare. Studios start at around 150, and one bedrooms start at around 200, with no upper limit. There is no way you could live comfortably on a student budget (under 10K a year, I guess) in London unless you rent a room in shared ex-council flat for the rest of your life.
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#113
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#113
Well, in comparison, my friends currently pay about £50 a week for a houseshare in my local university town. And thats a 5 bedroom, three bathroomed house with all the mod-cons.

Of course London is going to be ridiculously over-priced.
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Clubber Lang
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#114
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#114
(Original post by more adventurous)
What do you mean a 'normal' household?

I only know about London, but most students pay about 100-120 for a flatshare. Studios start at around 150, and one bedrooms start at around 200, with no upper limit. There is no way you could live comfortably on a student budget (under 10K a year, I guess) in London unless you rent a room in shared ex-council flat for the rest of your life.
I mean, if someone is a student and living cheap on a £80 rent a week - after Uni they can easily move into another flat with just one other person around around £80-100 a week.

You don't HAVE to get into ridiculous £x a month mortages to live somewhere.

London is a hole though and its just one extra reason not to live there.
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loopymeg
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#115
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#115
Well considering there's no chance of me living in London (I hate the place), I don't need to worry about that. Around here at least, a shared house can be between £40-£80 per week including some form of bill allowance, and they're quite nice places.
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la fille danse
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#116
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#116
If you keep sharing with people every year, I guarantee you will eventually come into an experience that will make you never want to share again!

I had that experience this year. I will never share again (unless it's with people I know really well).
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loopymeg
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#117
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#117
I've already shared with a bunch of people who managed to drive me insane. The difference is that now I get a choice over who I share with, and so I'll be quite happy sharing with my close friends. Actually, if I ever need to share a place back in Worcester, then I can think of some people I would love to live with!
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la fille danse
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#118
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#118
Your close friends won't always be around for you to share with though... some will get jobs in different cities (or you will), some will want to live alone, some will get married, etc.
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Clubber Lang
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#119
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#119
(Original post by more adventurous)
Your close friends won't always be around for you to share with though... some will get jobs in different cities (or you will), some will want to live alone, some will get married, etc.
Just dont share with young people - share with mature people
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loopymeg
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#120
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#120
Yup, but that's where I get to know people years in advance so that when it comes to the search, I can ask them. If I can't live with close friends then I wouldn't be too bothered - it just prompts me to get to know other people, and if we don't get on quite so well then I just move on. Also, if I ever had the choice between sharing or having my own house, then I'd still prefer to share - a silent house is just not right.
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