Join TSR now and get answers to all your questions about uniSign up now

'Uber' for private GP appointments Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/your-pra...032808.article

    Saw this, checked the prices, seems they offer £40 for a 15 minute consultation, I wonder if it's a 10 or 20% cut the company takes.

    Curious about people's thoughts here - last time I asked about GPs though it didn't seem as if the forum was crawling with them, but I suppose you don't need to be one to have an opinion!
    Online

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Private healthcare isn't exactly a revolutionary concept - it's always existed.

    If people want to pay to see a GP, fine. At the end of the day it takes the strain off an already overwhelmed system.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Private healthcare isn't exactly a revolutionary concept - it's always existed.

    If people want to pay to see a GP, fine. At the end of the day it takes the strain off an already overwhelmed system.
    Naturally. I didn't think it was revolutionary, I suppose I am wondering if there's such demand to sustain a business like this - has it got that bad in the NHS.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PoolR)
    Naturally. I didn't think it was revolutionary, I suppose I am wondering if there's such demand to sustain a business like this - has it got that bad in the NHS.
    Tbh I can't get an appointment within a week at my practice. I imagine it's similar for others. If you're desperate, it's not a huge amount to pay for those who can afford it. People don't like waiting so I'm sure some people would pay.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    There are private GP Practices in the part of London I live in...

    I used one for a simple problem recently for convenience reasons not because the NHS was "bad" i.e. Saturday appointment & to be seen quickly. I didn't think I could justify pushing for an urgent NHS appointment but the next routine was something like 2 weeks away & my preference was to be seen sooner! But I think my NHS GP Practice is fab.

    We've also used them for vaccinations outside of the NHS schedule.


    Would I want to work in one? Not sure... I imagine there's a skew towards challenging patients (customers? ;-) ) who are paying to try to get what they want rather than neccessarily what would be good medicine & that might add another layer of challenge to the consultations.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Private healthcare isn't exactly a revolutionary concept - it's always existed.

    If people want to pay to see a GP, fine. At the end of the day it takes the strain off an already overwhelmed system.
    True, but then you could argue that the most frequent users of GP services are probably people who wouldn't be able to afford the price- the retired, the deprived, people with chronic conditions who can't work etc.

    I heard a radio ad for an online service where you can talk to a doctor and even get a diagnosis and prescription etc all online! I would personally find that super scary to do if I was a GP. :eek:

    https://www.pushdoctor.co.uk/
    Online

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BakedBeanz)
    True, but then you could argue that the most frequent users of GP services are probably people who wouldn't be able to afford the price- the retired, the deprived, people with chronic conditions who can't work etc.

    I heard a radio ad for an online service where you can talk to a doctor and even get a diagnosis and prescription etc all online! I would personally find that super scary to do if I was a GP. :eek:

    https://www.pushdoctor.co.uk/
    Private healthcare can co-exist NHS services. Ultimately, you can't opt out of paying your portion of tax for the NHS, so the service retains its income while having some of the demand diverted elsewhere.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MJK91)
    Tbh I can't get an appointment within a week at my practice. I imagine it's similar for others. If you're desperate, it's not a huge amount to pay for those who can afford it. People don't like waiting so I'm sure some people would pay.
    I have to wait 2 weeks for an appointment, just makes me think what is the point? Might have a serious problem, but who cares?
    Online

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by spanker)
    I have to wait 2 weeks for an appointment, just makes me think what is the point? Might have a serious problem, but who cares?
    2 weeks is a long time to wait with symptoms, I agree. But in the grand scheme of things, 2 weeks is unlikely to contribute to progression of disease significantly, in conditions that aren't A&E worthy. I would also argue that the majority of the problems that would have presented in that time would probably have self-resolved.

    I think a lot of the issue with GP availability is down to unrealistic patient expectation and a consumerist, convenience based culture, as well as a general refusal to take responsibility for ones own health.
    Online

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Private healthcare isn't exactly a revolutionary concept - it's always existed.

    If people want to pay to see a GP, fine. At the end of the day it takes the strain off an already overwhelmed system.
    Incorrect, this system won't actually be invested in training new GPs, it'll just encourage current GPs to prioritise patients who'll pay, it won't ease the strain at all and will just push those who need to access it further down the list.
    Online

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    Incorrect, this system won't actually be invested in training new GPs, it'll just encourage current GPs to prioritise patients who'll pay, it won't ease the strain at all and will just push those who need to access it further down the list.
    I suppose it depends on how it alters the behaviour of GPs.

    Assuming that GPs don't restrict their usual working hours in favor of these appointments, then it would only help the system (i.e. moonlighting). If more GPs opt to be part-time with the intention of filling the gaps with private appointments, then yeah it would be an issue.
    Online

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Unsurprising news, I'm not opposed to have a two-tiered medical system, but only if they were entirely separate. Separate buildings with new GPs would lower the strain, but that's not happening. Disgusting as well that there is now a private firm creaming profits off our work, especially when we own all liabilities for that work. Additionally, who'll benefit from this? If you're nervous and want reassurance, yes, this helps, but if you need a referral, you'll still fall to the back of the queue (and rightly so) then they will complain and ask rightly why they pay for an essentially pointless discussion. With this coming, surely other payment systems aren't far behind.
    Online

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Etomidate)
    I suppose it depends on how it alters the behaviour of GPs.

    Assuming that GPs don't restrict their usual working hours in favor of these appointments, then it would only help the system (i.e. moonlighting). If more GPs opt to be part-time with the intention of filling the gaps with private appointments, then yeah it would be an issue.
    It's hard not to imagine GPs creating a "private sessions slot" of an hour a day that then sits empty if no-one takes it. I suppose if they work extra hours it isn't too bad, but it means more appointments will be booked, so longer waiting times for those who can't pay. It flies in the face of everything we're taught in terms of what drives medical professionals. Doesn't exactly appear great either in light of JD IA.
    Online

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Exactly the intentions of JH and Co. The encroachment of the two tiered healthcare system continues.

    Just need to think of a way more bureaucrats can be introduced though. JH still has some friends who aren't profiting.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    Unsurprising news, I'm not opposed to have a two-tiered medical system, but only if they were entirely separate. Separate buildings with new GPs would lower the strain, but that's not happening. Disgusting as well that there is now a private firm creaming profits off our work, especially when we own all liabilities for that work. Additionally, who'll benefit from this? If you're nervous and want reassurance, yes, this helps, but if you need a referral, you'll still fall to the back of the queue (and rightly so) then they will complain and ask rightly why they pay for an essentially pointless discussion. With this coming, surely other payment systems aren't far behind.
    the Vast majority GPs are not NHS employees , they are partners / directors or employees of a Private business ( and those that solely do locums are either employess ofthe agency of directors of personal services company) that sells it;s services the to NHS on a bulk contract base.

    please refrain from commenting further until you understand what this means.
    • #1
    #1

    (Original post by zippyRN)
    the Vast majority GPs are not NHS employees , they are partners / directors or employees of a Private business ( and those that solely do locums are either employess ofthe agency of directors of personal services company) that sells it;s services the to NHS on a bulk contract base.

    please refrain from commenting further until you understand what this means.
    What a totally irrelevent comment
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    What a totally irrelevent comment
    really ?

    as it appears you do not understand the nature of provision of GMS services under the GMS contract , you are not in position to pass comment on the topic of how GMS providers use time outside their GMS contracted activity levels.
    Online

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zippyRN)
    really ?

    as it appears you do not understand the nature of provision of GMS services under the GMS contract , you are not in position to pass comment on the topic of how GMS providers use time outside their GMS contracted activity levels.
    You've totally ignored my point to instead reiterate your stance. The truth is I don't know particularly much about tendering through GMS contracts, other than the new implementation on locum staff and a named GP scheme. That said, no need for your arrogance here, additionally, it is irrelevant to my previous point, although I see your overlap. I distinguish firm as in a GP run and led local practice versus a private health firm. My point was that this kind of two-tiered system should be run by separate firms, so in this case, if you want to queue skip you have to see Dr X rather than your own GP, insurance claims should be different for GPs undergoing this work as surely these consumers are more likely to sue, etc.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    You've totally ignored my point to instead reiterate your stance. The truth is I don't know particularly much about tendering through GMS contracts, other than the new implementation on locum staff and a named GP scheme. That said, no need for your arrogance here, additionally, it is irrelevant to my previous point, although I see your overlap. I distinguish firm as in a GP run and led local practice versus a private health firm. My point was that this kind of two-tiered system should be run by separate firms, so in this case, if you want to queue skip you have to see Dr X rather than your own GP, insurance claims should be different for GPs undergoing this work as surely these consumers are more likely to sue, etc.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    typical delusional corbynista rubbish.

    the unpalatable truth for the left is - the NHS has never been the great monolithic socialist triumph it is painted as, the vast majority of patient interactions since 1948 and to the present day take place in private provider units.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zippyRN)
    typical delusional corbynista rubbish.

    the unpalatable truth for the left is - the NHS has never been the great monolithic socialist triumph it is painted as, the vast majority of patient interactions since 1948 and to the present day take place in private provider units.
    I don't think people give a **** if it's a socialist triumph or provided by private companies -- so long as the bid that wins a service is cost-effective in the true sense of the word (i.e. cheapest cost for actual efficacy), then what's the problem? GPs are still funded by the government and the NHS, even if there is a private provider.
 
 
 
Poll
Is GoT overrated?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.