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    After obtaining a degree in mathematics, where can you go on from there? What jobs would be available?
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    (Original post by suejiaiuo)
    After obtaining a degree in mathematics, where can you go on from there? What jobs would be available?
    Stay in the academia or look for a graduate job?!
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    I'm doing a maths degree in like a week lol so this thread is relevant
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    I'm doing a maths degree in like a week lol so this thread is relevant
    Y:Ou're doing a maths degree in a week?!?!
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    Accounting, actuary, teaching, business stuff, data science,
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    It's important to secure experience throughout your degrees in the summer, maybe even a placement year, so that you get some experience and an idea of what you'd like to do.

    So with that in mind, look around and see what you'd lile.. I guess it's natural to think about something finance related, perhaps that can be your starting point?

    (Original post by Mystery.)
    Y:Ou're doing a maths degree in a week?!?!
    Asian parents would finally be proud :moon:
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    (Original post by suejiaiuo)
    After obtaining a degree in mathematics, where can you go on from there? What jobs would be available?
    most grad jobs are open to any degree, and some state preference for any STEM degree.. so it'd be a question of what do you want to do, and what experience/interests do you have and not what can you do.

    that, or teaching or continue working towards a PhD then go into research/a field where a PhD is usually a prerequisite (quant finance) or just become a bum and not do anything.

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    (Original post by Mystery.)
    Y:Ou're doing a maths degree in a week?!?!
    I will be starting it in a week.... sorry lol
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    A lot of grad schemes don't specify a particular course, just that you've obtained a minimum grade of (usually) a 2:1. There are obviously certain professions that require a particular individual (or one of a group of) degree discipline.

    I'm just about to begin working as a trainee actuary after graduating with a maths degree, and actuarial is one career you could look into which is more numerate. There's also the obvious accountancy, investment banking, academia, data science, etc. areas in which you'd benefit from having a maths degree.

    But really, if there's something you're interested in pursuing, it's just as much (if not, more so) about the experience you have than the degree you have when it comes to getting a job, so don't just limit yourself to something you feel you should go for just because you studied maths. If you have a passion for something, that pays dividends.
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    Thanks for the responses. I think the getting some experience is a really good idea, and will try get some whenever I can. As for job, I'll see after a few years of studying Maths what part of maths I prefer, pure or applied and my interests then.
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    You can go into pretty much any job, except ones which require vocational degrees (engineer, doctor, dentist, nurse etc).
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    You can do a lot, but don't presume the degree itself will do anything more than get your foot in the door for an interview(s). You'll need lots more to actually get a good job.
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    Insurance, management consulting.
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    If you can show evidence of good communication skills when you get to an interview for a job or internship, you should be in a good position because there is a tendency for maths students to lack those types of skills.
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    (Original post by eimmas)
    A lot of grad schemes don't specify a particular course, just that you've obtained a minimum grade of (usually) a 2:1. There are obviously certain professions that require a particular individual (or one of a group of) degree discipline.

    I'm just about to begin working as a trainee actuary after graduating with a maths degree, and actuarial is one career you could look into which is more numerate. There's also the obvious accountancy, investment banking, academia, data science, etc. areas in which you'd benefit from having a maths degree.

    But really, if there's something you're interested in pursuing, it's just as much (if not, more so) about the experience you have than the degree you have when it comes to getting a job, so don't just limit yourself to something you feel you should go for just because you studied maths. If you have a passion for something, that pays dividends.
    This.

    Plus, if anyone's about to start their degree, then remember that it is VITAL that you have a significant amount of work experience and extra curriculars on your CV for when you graduate and apply for jobs.

    Ensure that you do an internship during the summer after your second year, ensure that you find a part time job (anything will do - retail/admin/...), ensure that you become a department representative or society committee member.

    Maths students are notorious for dismissing all the extra opportunities and graduating with nothing but a piece of paper, and surprise, surprise, they vastly struggle to find even a minimum wage job upon graduation. Make sure you take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way or you can wave bye bye to your dream job.
 
 
 
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