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GCSE Biology HELP!!!

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    I have to write a hypothesis and method to test the idea that "clover leaves in shaded parts of a field are a different size to those in sunny areas". I'm so confused mainly because I wasn't there for the full lesson and I haven't been able to speak to the teacher. I'd just like some guidance Thank you!
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    anonymous0518
    Remember that sunlight is needed for photosynthesis, which provides the glucose for respiration. Respiration creates energy, which is used for the main life processes. Taking this into account, what do you think will happen to a clover plant that gets lots of sunlight compared to a clover plant that doesn't get much? (Assume that both plants are alive!)

    Are you familiar with the term 'transect'?
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    (Original post by emmald583)
    anonymous0518
    Remember that sunlight is needed for photosynthesis, which provides the glucose for respiration. Respiration creates energy, which is used for the main life processes. Taking this into account, what do you think will happen to a clover plant that gets lots of sunlight compared to a clover plant that doesn't get much? (Assume that both plants are alive!)

    Are you familiar with the term 'transect'?
    The clover plant that gets lots of sunlight will have a lot more energy? I'm sorry, I'm not really good in biology.

    Yes, I am supposed to be using the terms transect, quadrant etc. So the clovers that receive a lot of sunlight have more energy than the clovers in the shade?
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    (Original post by anonymous0518)
    The clover plant that gets lots of sunlight will have a lot more energy? I'm sorry, I'm not really good in biology.

    Yes, I am supposed to be using the terms transect, quadrant etc. So the clovers that receive a lot of sunlight have more energy than the clovers in the shade?
    It is correct that they will have more energy. The main point, however, is what they will use that extra energy for.

    Think about MRS GREN. Which process do you think they will use the energy for?
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    (Original post by emmald583)
    It is correct that they will have more energy. The main point, however, is what they will use that extra energy for.

    Think about MRS GREN. Which process do you think they will use the energy for?
    Photosynthesis? Respiration?
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    Plants need light energy to carry out photosynthesis, what does that tell you about where a plant needs to be to maximise photosynthesis?
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    (Original post by AfcFob)
    Plants need light energy to carry out photosynthesis, what does that tell you about where a plant needs to be to maximise photosynthesis?
    They need to be in the sunlight to maximise photosynthesis?
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    (Original post by anonymous0518)
    Photosynthesis? Respiration?
    Photosynthesis does require energy, but that is taken from sunlight.

    We've already established that the plants in more sunlight will photosynthesise more and consequently have more energy. How, then, do you think this will affect their size?
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    (Original post by emmald583)
    Photosynthesis does require energy, but that is taken from sunlight.

    We've already established that the plants in more sunlight will photosynthesise more and consequently have more energy. How, then, do you think this will affect their size?
    They will be a lot more larger.
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    (Original post by anonymous0518)
    They will be a lot more larger.
    :top:

    Now have a think about what methods you could use to test your hypothesis.
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    (Original post by anonymous0518)
    They will be a lot more larger.
    I'm sorry if i'm wrong but it's actually the other way round; plants in the shade have less light so they try to increase their surface area in order to get as much light as they possibly can to photosynthesise.

    Therefore the plants that have more sunshine should be smaller and those in an area of shade should be bigger.
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    (Original post by charlie66)
    I'm sorry if i'm wrong but it's actually the other way round; plants in the shade have less light so they try to increase their surface area in order to get as much light as they possibly can to photosynthesise.

    Therefore the plants that have more sunshine should be smaller and those in an area of shade should be bigger.
    I agree it would be a waster of energy to grow bigger leaves when it is in the middle of a field. Plants in the shade do not get much light so they need a larger surface area to increase the chances of capturing sunlight to photosyntheise
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    (Original post by charlie66)
    I'm sorry if i'm wrong but it's actually the other way round; plants in the shade have less light so they try to increase their surface area in order to get as much light as they possibly can to photosynthesise.

    Therefore the plants that have more sunshine should be smaller and those in an area of shade should be bigger.
    Thank you!!
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    (Original post by charlie66)
    I'm sorry if i'm wrong but it's actually the other way round; plants in the shade have less light so they try to increase their surface area in order to get as much light as they possibly can to photosynthesise.

    Therefore the plants that have more sunshine should be smaller and those in an area of shade should be bigger.
    (Original post by Jehaan)
    I agree it would be a waster of energy to grow bigger leaves when it is in the middle of a field. Plants in the shade do not get much light so they need a larger surface area to increase the chances of capturing sunlight to photosyntheise
    If they are in a shaded area, without much sunlight, where do you think they're going to find that extra energy?

    If you look up the effect of sunlight on plant growth you will find that a plant with more sunlight will grow faster. Some plants have adapted to have bigger leaves to maximise the amount of sunlight they can obtain, but this is not the same as the general growth of the plant increasing in proportion to the sunlight it receives.
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    (Original post by emmald583)
    If they are in a shaded area, without much sunlight, where do you think they're going to find that extra energy?

    If you look up the effect of sunlight on plant growth you will find that a plant with more sunlight will grow faster. Some plants have adapted to have bigger leaves to maximise the amount of sunlight they can obtain, but this is not the same as the general growth of the plant increasing in proportion to the sunlight it receives.
    "Sun leaves deal with more heat and drying wind in their exposed locations, but rapid photosynthesis and small chloroplasts allow for a smaller leaf. The smaller surface area protects against drying too. Shade leaves expand in size to collect as much light as possible. Their sheltered locations guard against water loss. Sun and shade leaves also differ in their tiny pore-like openings, usually concentrated on the protected undersides of the leaves. Known as stomata, these pores are smaller in sun leaves, but they compensate by being more dense. Shade-leaf stomata are larger and much fewer in number."
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    (Original post by charlie66)
    "Sun leaves deal with more heat and drying wind in their exposed locations, but rapid photosynthesis and small chloroplasts allow for a smaller leaf. The smaller surface area protects against drying too. Shade leaves expand in size to collect as much light as possible. Their sheltered locations guard against water loss. Sun and shade leaves also differ in their tiny pore-like openings, usually concentrated on the protected undersides of the leaves. Known as stomata, these pores are smaller in sun leaves, but they compensate by being more dense. Shade-leaf stomata are larger and much fewer in number."
    You are missing my point about general size. It is true that the leaves of a plant in a shaded position or area may have adapted to be bigger to get as much light as possible. However, the general size of a plant in the light will be bigger because it can photosynthesise more.
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    (Original post by emmald583)
    You are missing my point about general size. It is true that the leaves of a plant in a shaded position or area may have adapted to be bigger to get as much light as possible. However, the general size of a plant in the light will be bigger because it can photosynthesise more.
    The thread starter is asking about the leaves though not the size of the plant in general.
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    (Original post by choc.chip.cookie)
    The thread starter is asking about the leaves though not the size of the plant in general.
    How embarrassing! I didn't even see the word leaves

    Thanks for nicely pointing out choc.chip.cookie! In that case, OP, the other posters are correct.
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    Shade plants do indeed have larger leaves
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    (Original post by MartynaJP6)
    Shade plants do indeed have larger leaves
    (Original post by emmald583)
    You are missing my point about general size. It is true that the leaves of a plant in a shaded position or area may have adapted to be bigger to get as much light as possible. However, the general size of a plant in the light will be bigger because it can photosynthesise more.
    (Original post by charlie66)
    "Sun leaves deal with more heat and drying wind in their exposed locations, but rapid photosynthesis and small chloroplasts allow for a smaller leaf. The smaller surface area protects against drying too. Shade leaves expand in size to collect as much light as possible. Their sheltered locations guard against water loss. Sun and shade leaves also differ in their tiny pore-like openings, usually concentrated on the protected undersides of the leaves. Known as stomata, these pores are smaller in sun leaves, but they compensate by being more dense. Shade-leaf stomata are larger and much fewer in number."
    Thank you all!! This really helped!!
 
 
 
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