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What is Access to HE, and iis it similar to BTEC

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    One of my m8s is doing this course, not sure if its a good course for him. Is it similar to btec where you give assignments.

    is the assignments hard?

    how many modules do you get?

    lmk, he really is begging me for my help, i dont mind helping him but i srsly duno anything about this course.
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    My course had 20 modules, 15 graded and 5 ungraded. It's not that hard, just time consuming. Some are all assignments, some a mixture of assignments and exams. He should get a list of the learning criteria for each assignment that he needs to fulfill to pass it.

    What's subject is he doing?
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    (Original post by JamesN88)
    My course had 20 modules, 15 graded and 5 ungraded. It's not that hard, just time consuming. Some are all assignments, some a mixture of assignments and exams. He should get a list of the learning criteria for each assignment that he needs to fulfill to pass it.

    What's subject is he doing?
    And is there a word limit to as to how much you can write in a coursework? He has no exams, just coursework.

    Cause in btec I wrote an average of 15- 20 pages for one assignment and in one unit had around 5 assignment, totalling up to 75-100 pages per unit.

    his doign acess course nursing.
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    (Original post by Light Venom)
    And is there a word limit to as to how much you can write in a coursework? He has no exams, just coursework.

    Cause in btec I wrote an average of 15- 20 pages for one assignment and in one unit had around 5 assignment, totalling up to 75-100 pages per unit.

    his doign acess course nursing.
    I did Access to Computing and there wasn't a word limit on the assignments, the tutor just said more is better and left it open to interpretation, I've heard some courses do though.
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    (Original post by Light Venom)
    And is there a word limit to as to how much you can write in a coursework? He has no exams, just coursework.

    Cause in btec I wrote an average of 15- 20 pages for one assignment and in one unit had around 5 assignment, totalling up to 75-100 pages per unit.

    his doign acess course nursing.
    I did access to pharmacy and all my assignments surpassed 20 pages (except for Study Skills). Some people wrote less though and still got the same grades. There was often no word limit, but I would say to get a distinction, the more (relevant) information you write the better. 15 pages of quality work should be the minimum to achieve higher grades.
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    (Original post by OptimusNick)
    I did access to pharmacy and all my assignments surpassed 20 pages (except for Study Skills). Some people wrote less though and still got the same grades. There was often no word limit, but I would say to get a distinction, the more (relevant) information you write the better. 15 pages of quality work should be the minimum to achieve higher grades.
    so access course is basically the same as btec, cool
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    (Original post by OptimusNick)
    I did access to pharmacy and all my assignments surpassed 20 pages (except for Study Skills). Some people wrote less though and still got the same grades. There was often no word limit, but I would say to get a distinction, the more (relevant) information you write the better. 15 pages of quality work should be the minimum to achieve higher grades.
    and why is the course designed for mature students that havent been in education for a long time, whats the difference and how is it structured?
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    (Original post by Light Venom)
    and why is the course designed for mature students that havent been in education for a long time, whats the difference and how is it structured?
    I'd only done GCSEs 10 years earlier so can't compare the structure to BTEC or A-Levels. There's a high workload but it's done in 1 year instead of 2. There's very few BTEC or A-Level courses available at colleges for those over 19(most don't offer any at all).

    Also it wouldn't be of any use as a standalone qualification when applying for a job, it's purely geared to prepare you for university.
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    (Original post by JamesN88)
    I'd only done GCSEs 10 years earlier so can't compare the structure to BTEC or A-Levels. There's a high workload but it's done in 1 year instead of 2. There's very few BTEC or A-Level courses available at colleges for those over 19(most don't offer any at all).

    Also it wouldn't be of any use as a standalone qualification when applying for a job, it's purely geared to prepare you for university.
    his doing it for the sole purpose to get into univeristy, so yeah, he already has a job but wants a career change.
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    I don't much about btec but I would say they are similar in regards to the topics that are covered. Access is just more intense because it's only 1 year.

    I think the intensity of the course is why it is aimed at mature students as they tend to be more focused and committed. Also, the Study Skills units are to assist those who have not been in education for a long period of time, manage the course more easily. For example, it is suppose to teach you how to make notes in class, write assignments, reference, prepare for exams etc, which will be useful for uni as well. You also do a couple (AS) maths modules too.

    Erm the structure is modular - so assignments/exams are usually set 1-2 weeks after the whole unit has been taught.

    So overall, the course provides you with the skills you need for uni and makes up for the qualifications you may have lacked otherwise, which universities may require.
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    (Original post by OptimusNick)
    I don't much about btec but I would say they are similar in regards to the topics that are covered. Access is just more intense because it's only 1 year.

    I think the intensity of the course is why it is aimed at mature students as they tend to be more focused and committed. Also, the Study Skills units are to assist those who have not been in education for a long period of time, manage the course more easily. For example, it is suppose to teach you how to make notes in class, write assignments, reference, prepare for exams etc, which will be useful for uni as well. You also do a couple (AS) maths modules too.

    Erm the structure is modular - so assignments/exams are usually set 1-2 weeks after the whole unit has been taught.

    So overall, the course provides you with the skills you need for uni and makes up for the qualifications you may have lacked otherwise, which universities may require.
    sound exactly like btec but mroe intense since its only a year.
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    (Original post by Light Venom)
    One of my m8s is doing this course, not sure if its a good course for him. Is it similar to btec where you give assignments.

    is the assignments hard?

    how many modules do you get?

    lmk, he really is begging me for my help, i dont mind helping him but i srsly duno anything about this course.
    I've been offered a place on the Access to Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy course at my local college, and I can confirm, it is nothing like BTEC. It's completely different. The work is much more in depth and you'll get lots of assignments (and an exam at the end of of each module). The biology, chemistry modules is taught to A level standard and is assessed through exams, practicals, lab reports, etc. Like I said, if you work hard, and get good grades, you will succeed!
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    (Original post by Sniper91)
    I've been offered a place on the Access to Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy course at my local college, and I can confirm, it is nothing like BTEC. It's completely different. The work is much more in depth and you'll get lots of assignments (and an exam at the end of of each module). The biology, chemistry modules is taught to A level standard and is assessed through exams, practicals, lab reports, etc. Like I said, if you work hard, and get good grades, you will succeed!
    I agree, that makes sense.

    And why do certain unis allow access courses over btec, i dont understand . like qmul reject btec students but not access courses. back in the days my uncle got into qmul in btec and got first class degree.
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    (Original post by Light Venom)
    I agree, that makes sense.

    And why do certain unis allow access courses over btec, i dont understand . like qmul reject btec students but not access courses. back in the days my uncle got into qmul in btec and got first class degree.
    I think it's partly because Access is more rigorous and demanding than BTECs, and also because Access is taught in a similar way to degree courses, whereas BTECs tend to be more vocational.
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    It's nothing like BTEC, at all, whatsoever, etc.

    I've done two BTECs in my younger years - performing arts & applied science - and I've just started Access to HE Social Sciences.

    The course - level 3 - is done over one year instead of two. The assessment process is different - at least in my experience - in that you don't keep getting work handed to back to you to improve on it; if you get a merit when your assignment is assessed, then that is your grade. You only get your work handed back to you if you've missed something very important - like if one of the assessment criterion is completely missing. In BTEC,you could get the work back several times in order to achieve distinction after distinction, etc.

    Access to HE is more suited to adult learners (mature students). In an intake of 20 social sciences students, my college has just the one teenager (18), who has been given special dispensation due to having a six month old. My college generally only takes people 19+ on the Access. In fact, the average age is about 35 across the entire Access area (six pathways) - which, apparently, is older than previous years. I'm an anomaly. If I were older, I think the average age would be older, also.

    Access is also very academic. Heaps of written assignments, exams (we actually do time-constrained essays at my college, but I've heard that others do actual exams). BTECs are very practical. Universities accept them as a qualification, but I never really understood why. I never felt like I was being prepared for academia until I started Access to HE. Especially with all the attempts given to get a distinction.

    This year, I have 3 modules (psychology, criminology & sociology) and 60 credits (45 taught, fifteen credits per module + 15 untaught, as our college is only allowed to teach 45 credits), all at level three, even the untaught units - the untaught units, for me anyway, are core skills. Some colleges, apparently, do core skills at level 2. Mine doesn't, hey ho.

    BTEC courses might expect essays for all assignments (or lab reports in science-based subjects), an Access course may use different assessment methods - this year, in each module, I have at least one essay, one booklet, one solo presentation, one research project and one time constrained essay (exam conditions, but not an actual exam - for example, in Criminology on the 4th of November I will have 100 minutes - i.e. one whole class - to answer five questions essay-style, and that will constitute one assignment). One of my psychology units has an essay AND a booklet. Either sociology or criminology requires one assignment be both a powerpoint presentation AND a research project.

    I reiterate points - Access to HE is hell of a lot more intensive (some colleges offer it part-time over two years, yada yada, but not many from my research). Hell of a lot more academic. Hell of a lot more strict with grading. It is definitely for students who are serious about going to university. Plus, they only accept "mature" students, with the occasional exception (the 18 year old in my class - but she is a parent). Lots of colleges also only provide evening classes. Never understood why. Especially when most of their students have families, lots I have come into contact with are also single parents with little support.

    I'd go as far to say that the only similarities are the grades you can receive - i.e. Pass, Merit, Distinction - even if the way you are actually graded is heck of a lot different. And that you do lab reports if you study science subjects.
 
 
 
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