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    Question above.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Question above.
    Are you referring to chemical properties? Or Physical?
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    Which properties do you want explained?
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    (Original post by sabahshahed294)
    Are you referring to chemical properties? Or Physical?
    chemical properties please electron configuration etc.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    chemical properties please electron configuration etc.
    Alright. I believe you're aware that transition metals have incomplete 3d subshells. Like they have a general configuration of [Ar],3dn,4s2(except for copper and chromium which is 4s1 ). Whenever they become ions, the electrons are first lost from the 4s subshell and then the 3d subshell. The d electrons are mainly responsible for their properties actually. (such as colour, different oxidation states etc). If I'm misunderstanding your exact question, please mention it to me.
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    (Original post by sabahshahed294)
    Alright. I believe you're aware that transition metals have incomplete 3d subshells. Like they have a general configuration of [Ar],3dn,4s2(except for copper and chromium which is 4s1 ). Whenever they become ions, the electrons are first lost from the 4s subshell and then the 3d subshell. The d electrons are mainly responsible for their properties actually. (such as colour, different oxidation states etc). If I'm misunderstanding your exact question, please mention it to me.
    Just to GCSE standard I don't understand what you are saying sorry it is a bit complex.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Just to GCSE standard I don't understand what you are saying sorry it is a bit complex.
    You're going to need to learn more before you can understand why the properties are the way they are.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Just to GCSE standard I don't understand what you are saying sorry it is a bit complex.
    Oh, sorry I apologize on that. I was assuming you're in A Levels.
    They have similar properties because of their electronic configurations. They're having incomplete inner shells actually. Id honestly know how much you have to know for GCSEs as in my time, we only had to know this much. The rest of the details were taught in A Levels actually.
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    (Original post by sabahshahed294)
    Oh, sorry I apologize on that. I was assuming you're in A Levels.
    They have similar properties because of their electronic configurations. They're having incomplete inner shells actually. Id honestly know how much you have to know for GCSEs as in my time, we only had to know this much. The rest of the details were taught in A Levels actually.
    Oh thank you so much I appreciate it
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    (Original post by sabahshahed294)
    Oh, sorry I apologize on that. I was assuming you're in A Levels.
    They have similar properties because of their electronic configurations. They're having incomplete inner shells actually. Id honestly know how much you have to know for GCSEs as in my time, we only had to know this much. The rest of the details were taught in A Levels actually.
    How are you finding A level chemistry i am hoping to do chemistry for a level as i want to became a doctor.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Oh thank you so much I appreciate it
    Welcome

    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    How are you finding A level chemistry i am hoping to do chemistry for a level as i want to became a doctor.

    Well, the jump is really big I'd say even though there are stuff that you studied back in GCSEs but yeah, the level of difficulty is much higher than that of GCSEs but if you are regularly in touch with the subject and have a sound understanding, it is actually easy to score. And, the regular part is important because Chemistry grade boundaries are quite unforgiving. And yeah, nice plan to become a doctor. Wish you good luck!
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    How are you finding A level chemistry i am hoping to do chemistry for a level as i want to became a doctor.
    I'm doing A-level chemistry, and I haven't found the course to be too difficult. Most of your GCSE knowledge is assumed and built upon to a much higher level (and you find out that electron configuration is far more complex than the GCSE model) but I think that as long as you've got a solid grounding from GCSE, you shouldn't find it too difficult, provided you work hard consistently throughout the course.

    Also, writing and balancing chemical equations needs to become second-nature, as you will be doing it a lot.

    But anyway, good luck with your aspiration to become a doctor! I'm sure you'll succeed if you put in the work (and work experience).
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    (Original post by K-Man_PhysCheM)
    I'm doing A-level chemistry, and I haven't found the course to be too difficult. Most of your GCSE knowledge is assumed and built upon to a much higher level (and you find out that electron configuration is far more complex than the GCSE model) but I think that as long as you've got a solid grounding from GCSE, you shouldn't find it too difficult, provided you work hard consistently throughout the course.

    Also, writing and balancing chemical equations needs to become second-nature, as you will be doing it a lot.

    But anyway, good luck with your aspiration to become a doctor! I'm sure you'll succeed if you put in the work (and work experience).
    the thing is i really dislike chemistry but I want to became a doctor should I like chemistry stop me from becaming a doctor or should I push through?
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    the thing is i really dislike chemistry but I want to became a doctor should I like chemistry stop me from becaming a doctor or should I push through?
    I'm pretty sure that almost all medical schools require A-level chemistry as a compulsory A-level, and for the remaining few, Chemistry would make you a much more competitive candidate.

    Medicine is highly competitive and Chemistry is demanded by many medical schools, so I'm afraid that without Chemistry A-level, you would have little chance of being accepted by a medical school. So if you really want to become a doctor, you are going to have to push through the Chemistry A-level.

    You should also look into work experience placements: again, medicine is highly competitive and most medical schools require at least some medicine-related work experience. Try finding some for the summer between Y11 and Y12.

    I don't want to come across so negatively, but I'm afraid that this is how it is. Good luck, whatever you end up doing!
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    the thing is i really dislike chemistry but I want to became a doctor should I like chemistry stop me from becaming a doctor or should I push through?
    You need to know a fair amount of chemistry to become a doctor. In first year medicine you will do a chemistry course also
 
 
 
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