Do you recommend Computer Science?

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    Its so much harder to do rather than I.T & Business but is it worth it? Are jobs easily found? Are they "well paid" ?

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    yes yes (provided its a good grade from a good university) yes
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    Having spoken to many graduate employers it seems they value soft skills over technical skills. Lots of the technical stuff is outsourced overseas. It's because of this I would recommend IT over Computer Science.
    If you want to be a programmer choose comp sci however.
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    (Original post by JorahMormont)
    Its so much harder to do rather than I.T & Business but is it worth it? Are jobs easily found? Are they "well paid" ?

    Thanks
    bumpppp
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    Don't be in it for the money. Be in it because you genuinely feel a passion for it.
    You see a lot of compsci grads being overlooked in favour of grads from other disciplines who just taught themselves how to code (or non-grads), just because of the "boring" tag put on many compsci grads
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    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    Don't be in it for the money. Be in it because you genuinely feel a passion for it.
    You see a lot of compsci grads being overlooked in favour of grads from other disciplines who just taught themselves how to code (or non-grads), just because of the "boring" tag put on many compsci grads
    I do like them both. I taught myself how to use HTML/CSS and JavaScript so I'm more interested in Computer Sci but I'm fine with them both -I'd like to work in IT. But one is much harder to do at uni compared to the other but whats the reason?
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    I don't know about Uni IT, but as a school subject it was an absolute joke. Comp sci requires mathematical and programming skill on top of good analysis and problem solving; furthermore you need commitment. Not everyone can just become a computer scientist, which is why they and their skills are well sought after.
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    I'm a software engineer/computer scientist, and the skills and experience I use have very little in common with typical I.T. skills.

    For example - I've recently been reading a research paper on hard disk & SSD performance presented to the system via a RAID-5 controllers, with the aim of using the research to write a program that provides realistic performance estimates for potential customers who wish to use large (up to 320 core, 24 TB RAM, etc) systems.

    As part of this project I've been in communication with the author of the research paper, constructively criticising some of the arguments and mathematical formulae, with the result that the paper will be reworked to include my observations.

    Rather different from I.T. I think!

    And yes, it does pay quite well

    (My academic background is computer science from Durham quite a few years ago. I maintain contact with Durham which is why I'm on this website.)
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    (Original post by trident3)
    I'm a software engineer/computer scientist, and the skills and experience I use have very little in common with typical I.T. skills.

    For example - I've recently been reading a research paper on hard disk & SSD performance presented to the system via a RAID-5 controllers, with the aim of using the research to write a program that provides realistic performance estimates for potential customers who wish to use large (up to 320 core, 24 TB RAM, etc) systems.

    As part of this project I've been in communication with the author of the research paper, constructively criticising some of the arguments and mathematical formulae, with the result that the paper will be reworked to include my observations.

    Rather different from I.T. I think!

    And yes, it does pay quite well

    (My academic background is computer science from Durham quite a few years ago. I maintain contact with Durham which is why I'm on this website.)
    Thanks for the response Was Computer Science worth it? In terms of it being much harder than IT. Is the pay 'that' good? I've always been interested in coding etc but Computer Sci is much harder to get into that IT so I'm kinda stuck...
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    (Original post by JorahMormont)
    Thanks for the response Was Computer Science worth it? In terms of it being much harder than IT. Is the pay 'that' good? I've always been interested in coding etc but Computer Sci is much harder to get into that IT so I'm kinda stuck...
    Well, IT is very different from Computer Science. It's the difference between being the pilot of an aircraft and being a passenger

    As far as the pay being good - yes, if you have the talent, work hard and look for and take opportunities. I will definitely retire well before I'm 60 with my own house, no debts and a decent pension.

    Computer Science is much more than just coding.... that's just the foundation, along with mathematics, that Computer Science is built on.
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    (Original post by trident3)
    Well, IT is very different from Computer Science. It's the difference between being the pilot of an aircraft and being a passenger

    As far as the pay being good - yes, if you have the talent, work hard and look for and take opportunities. I will definitely retire well before I'm 60 with my own house, no debts and a decent pension.

    Computer Science is much more than just coding.... that's just the foundation, along with mathematics, that Computer Science is built on.
    How much maths is involved? Is it a lot? Because some uni's ask for A-Level Maths, and some dont. I didn't pick Maths because I didn't plan to do Computer Sci until very recently. However, Newcastle dont mind if you did maths or not, so I might apply there. But is the maths really hard? I dont like maths however I'm not too bad at it (B at GCSE). Thanks
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    (Original post by JorahMormont)
    How much maths is involved? Is it a lot? Because some uni's ask for A-Level Maths, and some dont. I didn't pick Maths because I didn't plan to do Computer Sci until very recently. However, Newcastle dont mind if you did maths or not, so I might apply there. But is the maths really hard? I dont like maths however I'm not too bad at it (B at GCSE). Thanks
    How much math depends on the course.

    Those courses that require A-level maths will probably have a higher maths content, and vice-versa. That's a good thing; you can pick the course that is appropriate to your maths ability.
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    (Original post by trident3)
    How much math depends on the course.

    Those courses that require A-level maths will probably have a higher maths content, and vice-versa. That's a good thing; you can pick the course that is appropriate to your maths ability.
    Will employees see/care about the difference? Will they react "He did a computer sci course without maths, he's not as good as the ones who did" etc?
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    There may be less maths on some courses than others but it will all be complex maths which is at a higher level than GCSE. Have you looked at the work involved in some of the modules at Newcastle University, these 2 for example http://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/modules/csc1025/ and http://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/modules/csc2023/ .

    As someone pointed out, the better jobs will go to those from the better universities so don't expect to get the same salary as someone from Cambridge/ICL/Warwick etc.

    I know somebody who runs a large company's IT dept and in his own words "IT Technicians are ten a penny". They are always on the lookout for people with Comp Sci degrees - better salary and more in demand.
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    (Original post by nutz99)
    There may be less maths on some courses than others but it will all be complex maths which is at a higher level than GCSE. Have you looked at the work involved in some of the modules at Newcastle University, these 2 for example http://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/modules/csc1025/ and http://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/modules/csc2023/ .

    As someone pointed out, the better jobs will go to those from the better universities so don't expect to get the same salary as someone from Cambridge/ICL/Warwick etc.

    I know somebody who runs a large company's IT dept and in his own words "IT Technicians are ten a penny". They are always on the lookout for people with Comp Sci degrees - better salary and more in demand.
    Thanks for all that info. I'm thinking of doing Computer Sci at somewhere like Newcastle, because then I can become either a software engineer or an IT Consultant, right? Ive read on Prospects.co.uk that you can become an IT Consultant with both a computer sci degree and IT degree, however to become a software engineer, you need computer sci, so it gives me more options, correct?
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    IT consultant is more of a jack of all trades. I wouldn't expect anyone to be able to walk into that type of role fresh from Uni. You'd need to get some experience first.

    As far as the courses are concerned have you considered doing Computer Science Bsc with maybe a year in industry or a summer internship. Then maybe a postgrad course in something like Business Information Systems.
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    (Original post by JorahMormont)
    Thanks for all that info. I'm thinking of doing Computer Sci at somewhere like Newcastle, because then I can become either a software engineer or an IT Consultant, right? Ive read on Prospects.co.uk that you can become an IT Consultant with both a computer sci degree and IT degree, however to become a software engineer, you need computer sci, so it gives me more options, correct?
    If you do Computer Science and later in industry you find you are lacking IT skills,
    you can always do Microsoft and Cisco types of certifications.
 
 
 
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