Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey,
    I'm applying for uni starting sept 2017 and just want to ask for some advice. I'm looking for a Games Art BA with a focus on concept art, or at least the inclusion of it. I'm interested in the 2D and 3D side of things, and have already got Pearson College, DMU, Norwich and a few others in mind.

    Are any of you on a Games Art BA that has a good balance of 2D and 3D art? Is anyone on a purely Concept Art BA?
    Also, if anyone has been to Pearson, DMU or Norwich and been on the Games Art courses, I'd love to hear what they're like.
    Thanks!

    (Also, before anyone swoops saying "concept art is such a competitive field that the courses are all based on 3D art because there are more jobs in that field~" save your breath because those of us interested in concept art are aware, okay? Great.)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi there. I'm also looking for an appropriate course. I'm afraid i haven't had too much luck. There are certainly some great options outside the uk but inside. less so. your best bet imo is an illustration or a games/animation course. DMU looks like a great course. Also from what i saw on the open day it had a strong emphasis on drawing. They also made it very clear that it was not a concept art course. When I visited Norwich they were much more open to students pursuing concept art, something that you have to do whilst your there though is actually make games. It's a much broader course. I haven't heard about the course at Pearson College but I will look into it. Something you should check out is the creative skill set website. The top game/animation/film related courses have the creative skill set tick. https://creativeskillset.org/creative_courses
    now a course that i would recommend is perhaps the games course at Hertfordshire University. There is a lot of work on how to produce 3D models for games and that is more the focus. Within that though there is still the potential to be creative and create things of your own design.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oliver Hopley)
    Hi there. I'm also looking for an appropriate course. I'm afraid i haven't had too much luck. There are certainly some great options outside the uk but inside. less so. your best bet imo is an illustration or a games/animation course. DMU looks like a great course. Also from what i saw on the open day it had a strong emphasis on drawing. They also made it very clear that it was not a concept art course. When I visited Norwich they were much more open to students pursuing concept art, something that you have to do whilst your there though is actually make games. It's a much broader course. I haven't heard about the course at Pearson College but I will look into it. Something you should check out is the creative skill set website. The top game/animation/film related courses have the creative skill set tick. https://creativeskillset.org/creative_courses
    now a course that i would recommend is perhaps the games course at Hertfordshire University. There is a lot of work on how to produce 3D models for games and that is more the focus. Within that though there is still the potential to be creative and create things of your own design.
    I have only found 2 with foundation year options. Any other recommendations? The only other ones i have found have a 2 year foundation course... I'm hoping to apply for a in total 4 year one including the FDA
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by James385)
    I have only found 2 with foundation year options. Any other recommendations? The only other ones i have found have a 2 year foundation course... I'm hoping to apply for a in total 4 year one including the FDA
    There is always the possibility of doing your foundation course at one place and then going to another for your BA. A lot of artists do this. I did a foundation course myself. I thoroughly enjoyed it and learnt a lot about semiotics, and how to ask questions about social culture with art. If I could give advice to you or anyone else doing a foundation course THIS STUFF IS NOT A WASTE OF TIME. It took me a while but eventually i realised it wasn't actually that hard to produce something that "looked cool" with the only reason behind it being "because it looks cool". It's being able to convey these semiotics and look cool at the same time that is really hard and is the real goal for artists. (by all means feel free to disagree with my little tangent). I wouldn't worry too much about where you go for foundation. They are on the whole very open ended courses where how much you get out of it will be down to the individual. Just from reputation I hear that oxford brooks and falmouth are very good, you would have to do some more research though,
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oliver Hopley)
    There is always the possibility of doing your foundation course at one place and then going to another for your BA. A lot of artists do this. I did a foundation course myself. I thoroughly enjoyed it and learnt a lot about semiotics, and how to ask questions about social culture with art. If I could give advice to you or anyone else doing a foundation course THIS STUFF IS NOT A WASTE OF TIME. It took me a while but eventually i realised it wasn't actually that hard to produce something that "looked cool" with the only reason behind it being "because it looks cool". It's being able to convey these semiotics and look cool at the same time that is really hard and is the real goal for artists. (by all means feel free to disagree with my little tangent). I wouldn't worry too much about where you go for foundation. They are on the whole very open ended courses where how much you get out of it will be down to the individual. Just from reputation I hear that oxford brooks and falmouth are very good, you would have to do some more research though,
    I have to do one. I never chose an art related course at GCSE and Alevel despite wanting to. I was told doing achemdic subjects would help me get a job. It has taken me 2 months doing business studies at a university to realise it's not what i want.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oliver Hopley)
    There is always the possibility of doing your foundation course at one place and then going to another for your BA. A lot of artists do this. I did a foundation course myself. I thoroughly enjoyed it and learnt a lot about semiotics, and how to ask questions about social culture with art. If I could give advice to you or anyone else doing a foundation course THIS STUFF IS NOT A WASTE OF TIME. It took me a while but eventually i realised it wasn't actually that hard to produce something that "looked cool" with the only reason behind it being "because it looks cool". It's being able to convey these semiotics and look cool at the same time that is really hard and is the real goal for artists. (by all means feel free to disagree with my little tangent). I wouldn't worry too much about where you go for foundation. They are on the whole very open ended courses where how much you get out of it will be down to the individual. Just from reputation I hear that oxford brooks and falmouth are very good, you would have to do some more research though,
    Just wondering, you make a great point that I could do a foundation and then go elsewhere for my BA... my A levels were not great nor did I did art related ones. With say a good grade in a foundation year (not sure how grading works... assuming its the same old 2:1 etc)... would i be able to get into falmouth? Would I have an advantage over someone who has say got BBB at A level. I'm going to assume they would likely give me an interview and it would be down to my portfolio.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by James385)
    Just wondering, you make a great point that I could do a foundation and then go elsewhere for my BA... my A levels were not great nor did I did art related ones. With say a good grade in a foundation year (not sure how grading works... assuming its the same old 2:1 etc)... would i be able to get into falmouth? Would I have an advantage over someone who has say got BBB at A level. I'm going to assume they would likely give me an interview and it would be down to my portfolio.
    Yes, this is entirely possible. A Distinction in Foundation I believe is the equivalent of 2 ALevels. You have time to find out how many Ucas points exactly. My advice would be try to contact the tutors there, send them your portfolio, tell them your doing foundation and ask what are the things that are missing from your portfolio.

    You might not get a response.

    If so send a follow up email.

    If still no response, call. (there should be a number on the website and you can ask the person to either put you through or give you a personal number).

    after that, stop. Being a pain in the ass won't help you and the person your trying to contact is unlikely to give you decent advice if there not also on the case when it comes to emails. Perhaps try and contacting students there instead.

    Just doing foundation will most likely get you an interview. A place like falmouth knows the value of a foundation course. However to get in you obviously have to capitalise on that. Make the most of every day to create something cool. Life drawing is important for artists but university's love that stuff to hells end. Good life drawing and some things showing that you are creative. Also that you can work in different styles will most likely get you into a lot of places.

    To be absolutely blunt though it dosen't matter what course your on there will be a bunch of people that won't get jobs at the end of it. In foundation you should be aiming to become as good as you possibly can. Especially with concept art. So I wish you the best of luck.

    Note: some encouragement, the most impressive VFX student where I'm at currently. only got 1 Alevel. He got in because he had an original portfolio (not the most incredible) and was the most enthusiastic guy in the interview. He undeniably deserves to be on the course and I would put money on the fact that he will be one to watch in industry after graduation. It's all just a matter of how much your willing to work at it.

    I wish you the best of luck and if you ever have questions specific to concept art then feel free to pm me.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oliver Hopley)
    Yes, this is entirely possible. A Distinction in Foundation I believe is the equivalent of 2 ALevels. You have time to find out how many Ucas points exactly. My advice would be try to contact the tutors there, send them your portfolio, tell them your doing foundation and ask what are the things that are missing from your portfolio.

    You might not get a response.

    If so send a follow up email.

    If still no response, call. (there should be a number on the website and you can ask the person to either put you through or give you a personal number).

    after that, stop. Being a pain in the ass won't help you and the person your trying to contact is unlikely to give you decent advice if there not also on the case when it comes to emails. Perhaps try and contacting students there instead.

    Just doing foundation will most likely get you an interview. A place like falmouth knows the value of a foundation course. However to get in you obviously have to capitalise on that. Make the most of every day to create something cool. Life drawing is important for artists but university's love that stuff to hells end. Good life drawing and some things showing that you are creative. Also that you can work in different styles will most likely get you into a lot of places.

    To be absolutely blunt though it dosen't matter what course your on there will be a bunch of people that won't get jobs at the end of it. In foundation you should be aiming to become as good as you possibly can. Especially with concept art. So I wish you the best of luck.

    Note: some encouragement, the most impressive VFX student where I'm at currently. only got 1 Alevel. He got in because he had an original portfolio (not the most incredible) and was the most enthusiastic guy in the interview. He undeniably deserves to be on the course and I would put money on the fact that he will be one to watch in industry after graduation. It's all just a matter of how much your willing to work at it.

    I wish you the best of luck and if you ever have questions specific to concept art then feel free to pm me.
    Thanks a lot you have helped me so much (and to everyone else on here who has commented). For Game Art (i may be wrong) but life drawing isn't on any of the module descriptions I have properly looked at (Staffordshire and teeside). From my understanding Game Art is mainly 3D modelling and animating with some 2D and level design (again 3D mostly). I may be totally wrong there. I'm not exactly a natural painter or sketcher... but with 3D I can visualize and create things.
    I may (depending on how good or bad my 3D designing is after my foundation) switch to a game design BA. Game designers take a more general role in forming games. From what I have understood you need to know a bit of everything (coding, 3D etc.. but without having to have crazy good skills in each).

    To be honest if i go to teesside of staffordshire and reall like the uni and people there and have made good friends... i will stay there. I didn't have the best of luck at Roehampton with flat mates and general social life. Teeside has a lot of computing/art/design courses... I think i will find a lot more people like myself and enjoy it.

    Your right in that... it's really how much work you put in. I took business with absolute distaste for the people in it (not all of course... but I'd bet there are more horrible bosses in business than something creative like a gaming company).
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.