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    Is this statement true about the clock speed for a CPU? "A higher clock speed allows the CPU to execute instructions quicker"

    The exam question asks "Explain how the clock speed of a CPU affects its performance"


    This is the mark scheme below I'm not sure if I would get the marks as the markscheme says something different to what I put.
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    (Original post by JackT2000)
    Is this statement true about the clock speed for a CPU? "A higher clock speed allows the CPU to execute instructions quicker"

    The exam question asks "Explain how to clock speed of a CPU affects its performace"
    This is the mark scheme below I'm not sure if I would get the marks as the markscheme says something different to what I put.
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    Yes, what you've said is true. Increasing the clock speed decreases the time taken for the computer to execute each instruction/process each piece of data, so overall the computer will execute the instructions faster. "The faster the CPU will run" is just a slightly more general way of expressing the same idea.
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    (Original post by emmald583)
    Yes, what you've said is true. Increasing the clock speed decreases the time taken for the computer to execute each instruction/process each piece of data, so overall the computer will execute the instructions faster. "The faster the CPU will run" is just a slightly more general way of expressing the same idea.
    JackT2000

    Edit: Misread again, the above is pretty much correct If there is a higher clock speed, more cycles can execute per second, meaning more instructions per second.

    Speaking in a general, probably post-GCSE sense, higher clock speed only really means higher performance, if:
    • The two CPUs being compared are of the same architecture.
    • The two CPUs being compared have the same number of cores.
    • The two CPUs have the same, or relatively similar IPC.
    • If the workload is tailored to prefer clock speed over the amount of cores. Several processes, like games, are still quite single-threaded.
    If it's the same CPU running at a different clock in each instance, the answer will often be yes provided it's stable at that clock.

    Just a bit of extra info there

    My answer, assuming a GCSE context, would be: "Yes, as there are more cycles per second, more instructions will be able to be handled within the given time frame, and thus the application/machine will perform "faster""
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    (Original post by _gcx)
    JackT2000

    Edit: Misread again, the above is pretty much correct If there is a higher clock speed, more cycles can execute per second, meaning more instructions per second.



    Speaking in a general, probably post-GCSE sense, higher clock speed only really means higher performance, if:
    • The two CPUs being compared are of the same architecture.
    • The two CPUs being compared have the same number of cores.
    • The two CPUs have the same, or relatively similar IPC.
    • If the workload is tailored to prefer clock speed over the amount of cores. Several processes, like games, are still quite single-threaded.
    If it's the same CPU running at a different clock in each instance, the answer will often be yes provided it's stable at that clock.

    Just a bit of extra info there

    My answer, assuming a GCSE context, would be: "Yes, as there are more cycles per second, more instructions will be able to be handled within the given time frame, and thus the application/machine will perform "faster""
    So if I wrote that in the exam I would get marks for it?
 
 
 
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