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Dative covalent bonding - H2F+

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    How would you draw H2F+ ?
    Thank you
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    In what way?
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    (Original post by alow)
    In what way?
    Dot and cross diagram
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    (Original post by nisha.sri)
    Dot and cross diagram
    Like H2O, but with one H-F bond being dative.
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    (Original post by alow)
    Like H2O, but with one H-F bond being dative.


    So this is H20 what do you mean by one H-F ?
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    (Original post by nisha.sri)
    So this is H20 what do you mean by one H-F ?
    H2F+ is isoelectronic with H2O, but one of the H-F bonds is dative.
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    Basically just draw out the dot and cross diagram for Fluorine. The + means it's missing 1 electron so it'll have 6 in its outer shell. Then just do the 1 electron from each Hydrogen being donated to the rest of the fluorine in the dot and cross diagram. Should have 2 lone pairs and 2 bonded
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    (Original post by everythingice)
    Basically just draw out the dot and cross diagram for Fluorine. The + means it's missing 1 electron so it'll have 6 in its outer shell. Then just do the 1 electron from each Hydrogen being donated to the rest of the fluorine in the dot and cross diagram. Should have 2 lone pairs and 2 bonded
    What you describe would be identical to Water's dot and cross diagram and would contain no dative bond.

    A better way would be to draw the diagram for HF then add on a H+ (this is better because addition of protons to HF is how the species forms)

    This gives a slightly different, correct, diagram!
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    (Original post by MexicanKeith)
    What you describe would be identical to Water's dot and cross diagram and would contain no dative bond.

    A better way would be to draw the diagram for HF then add on a H+ (this is better because addition of protons to HF is how the species forms)

    This gives a slightly different, correct, diagram!
    Oh oops yeah I forgot there was another step to it. I just usually do the dot and cross thing to extablish the sort of diagram i'm doing then I do brackets around it with a plus sign and an arrow instead of a line in the compound where one of the Hs is datively bonded.

    Need to do more chemistry practise haha.
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    (Original post by everythingice)
    Oh oops yeah I forgot there was another step to it. I just usually do the dot and cross thing to extablish the sort of diagram i'm doing then I do brackets around it with a plus sign and an arrow instead of a line in the compound where one of the Hs is datively bonded.

    Need to do more chemistry practise haha.
    Just thought I'd be picky for the sake of being 100% right, your way still ends up with the right diagram in terms of the final positions of electrons, just doesn't show where they come from so well! :w00t:
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    (Original post by MexicanKeith)
    Just thought I'd be picky for the sake of being 100% right, your way still ends up with the right diagram in terms of the final positions of electrons, just doesn't show where they come from so well! :w00t:
    Yeah fair enough.
 
 
 
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