Lying on application forms? Watch

naelse
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I have a dillemma:

I took four A2s, had no problem all year and was predicted straight As. Oddly when results came round there was one subject in which I had all As and Bs and then one random U. I asked for a remark and nothing changed, though I have no idea what happened. I ended up, therefore, with three As and a C. I've since pretty much decided that I don't accept what happened in that subject and I've left it out of my CV and any application forms.

However, it occured to me that if I get a TC they will want to see my certificates, and so they will see this extra A level. Does omitting an A level count as lying about my grades?

If you could reject a grade at A2 like you can at AS I would have. As far as I'm concerned I may as well have dropped that subject, but unfortunately I can't get rid of the evidence that I did it.
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simon123
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(Original post by naelse)
I have a dillemma:

I took four A2s, had no problem all year and was predicted straight As. Oddly when results came round there was one subject in which I had all As and Bs and then one random U. I asked for a remark and nothing changed, though I have no idea what happened. I ended up, therefore, with three As and a C. I've since pretty much decided that I don't accept what happened in that subject and I've left it out of my CV and any application forms.

However, it occured to me that if I get a TC they will want to see my certificates, and so they will see this extra A level. Does omitting an A level count as lying about my grades?

If you could reject a grade at A2 like you can at AS I would have. As far as I'm concerned I may as well have dropped that subject, but unfortunately I can't get rid of the evidence that I did it.

I am pretty sure that choosing to ommit a grade will not count as lieing.
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bleugh
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(Original post by simon123)
I am pretty sure that choosing to ommit a grade will not count as lieing.
Although I don't think it would necessarily count as lying it's still a failure to disclose the full truth. As the Law Society and Bar Council take a particular dislike to any form of dishonesty I'd say your best bet is to be as honest as possible and either claim mitigating circumstances on the form or explain at interview. But you still have three A grades so you should be fine.
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hsitin
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(Original post by bleugh)
But you still have three A grades so you should be fine.
Be as honest as possible or you will get found out. With regards to you 3 A's, they easily balance out the C because they do show your ability. With your other grades it would be easy to explain away the C no problems. Good Luck!
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Lush Law
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You must declare all your qualifications. Eversheds did a talk at my uni at the end of last year and they gave examples of how minor errors/very pointless lies resulted in people losing their TC.

You did 4 A-levels, a lot of people will only have 3, so don't worry about the C.
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Alan Smithee
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Stick with the 3As.
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naelse
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I'm scared that including the C will make my otherwise good academic record look really inconsistent Would you really take an applicant who had AAAC over one that had AAA? I wouldn't. Because with AAA there's no doubt over the person's academic achievements, whereas the C just stands out and screams "incompetant".
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Alan Smithee
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(Original post by naelse)
I'm scared that including the C will make my otherwise good academic record look really inconsistent Would you really take an applicant who had AAAC over one that had AAA? I wouldn't. Because with AAA there's no doubt over the person's academic achievements, whereas the C just stands out and screams "incompetant".
*Incompetent.

What degree class are you expecting?
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TKR
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I dunno... I always sort of thought grade stuff was to get you through the door and then it was about the interview etc. If you accept that view of the roleof grades in applications then the 3 As will be enough to get you in the door despite the C so it's not worth taking the risk of ommitting it.
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Lush Law
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Just declare it. It's a GOOD grade, and you have AAA in addition. You chose not to decline it when you got your A-level results and therefore you should stand by that. Be proud of it, it's an extra A-level.

You go to Cambridge, yes? Then you met the highest A-level offer any uni is gonna make, so that's good enough for any law firm. You don't actually need AAA to get a TC at a top firm. Firms care far more about your degree performance than A-level.
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Simon Myerson QC
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I would declare and explain. Otherwise, if people find out (likely) they will cut you precisely no slack at all.

I am curious. If you are an anarchist, why do you want a training contract? Shome contradiction shurely?
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chalks
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I'd echo Simon's comments.

Ignore, for now, any "moral" issues associated with failing to declare a result. I wouldn't lose too much sleep about that.

You can probably reach a decision based purely on a selfish risk/benefit analysis. The potential "benefit" in failing to declare the result is minimal - your overall academic results combined with place of study are easily sufficient to ensure that you're in the group of undergrads targeted by law firms. The 'C' grade will not make much difference.

On the other hand, the "risk" involved is substantial. If a firm was to discover your deliberate omission of a fact which might have played a role in their decision making process, then they will be less than impressed (even if the result in question would, in practice, have had a limited impact on their decision). In other words, the omission itself becomes more important than the grade. In those circumstances, you will be seen as someone who covers up something which needed to be explained - not a good look. Unfortunately, the "no-one will ever know" approach has a nasty way of failing with dramatic consequences. I "embellished" some parts of my application to Slaughters years ago and I got caught out. It was deeply embarrassing.

Include the result and, if you're still concerned, include some explanation in the usual "Anything else?" box on the application form.
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naelse
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Thanks for all your replies. You're so right Chalks, it's not worth it if, like you say, it wouldn't make much difference. I guess I just have to bite the bullet and hope for the best
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naelse
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(Original post by Simon Myerson QC)
I am curious. If you are an anarchist, why do you want a training contract? Shome contradiction shurely?
I like to be unpredictable

I'm not really an anarchist as such, though I don't really believe in the rule of law and I'm pretty much amoral. I just love law for the logic and problem solving, i guess. It's more of a fun brainteaser puzzle for me than anything to do with justice or morality or order.

In truth, I just chose the anarchy flag because I like the way it looks!
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Simon Myerson QC
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(Original post by naelse)
I like to be unpredictable

I'm not really an anarchist as such, though I don't really believe in the rule of law and I'm pretty much amoral. I just love law for the logic and problem solving, i guess. It's more of a fun brainteaser puzzle for me than anything to do with justice or morality or order.

In truth, I just chose the anarchy flag because I like the way it looks!
You'll make a fine solicitor then
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naelse
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(Original post by Simon Myerson QC)
You'll make a fine solicitor then
That's what I thought
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