Is North-South divide getting bigger? Watch

Consie
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#21
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#21
untill i can shop at selfridges up here, theres a divide.
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anonymous1985
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#22
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#22
Well, perhaps if those in the north dared for once to start changing their votes and stop marking an X by Labour in a nodding parrot fashion then perhaps things would look a little better for them and not so grim.

Northerners have always voted to keep themselves away from prosperity by voting for the left and then blaming the prosperous Tory south for their ills.

Hell will freeze over before northerners vote to change their fortune ......so be it!
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Catsmeat
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#23
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#23
(Original post by The Anthropologist)
Well, perhaps if those in the north dared for once to start changing their votes and stop marking an X by Labour in a nodding parrot fashion then perhaps things would look a little better for them and not so grim.

Northerners have always voted to keep themselves away from prosperity by voting for the left and then blaming the prosperous Tory south for their ills.

Hell will freeze over before northerners vote to change their fortune ......so be it!
I think that's quite unfair, in all honesty. You must remember that the nature of a third party in the UK is still quite undeveloped; the Liberal Democrats are offering a more consistent third option in the North, but to assume that "parrot fashion" (as you label it) the North is tribally voting for Labour is to ignore national trends where the Tories struggle to achieve clear margins in many southern areas (apart from Suffolk unfortunately, where the majority of the electorate seem to think there only is one damned party).

The North will not vote tory, are peeling away from Labour and are undecided about Lib Dem. Labour have undeniably been involved in a whole plethora of projects to 'reinvigorate' or bring a 'renaissance' (those patronising epithets) to Northern cities (Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle to name but a few) and you will see new development, a federalisation of business and a movement away from London and the Home Counties. However, it'll be a slow proccess; for a long time the North was the bread-basket of the UK, and now it's having to re-imagine its role in business, finance and industry. There are booms, but they'll take a little while to spread over the Moors, Dales and up into Scotland.

If you go near many large towns in rural areas you'll find evidence of a 'Londonisation', manifested with businessess setting up shop, retail developments and the inevitable spread of Waitrose and Sainsbury's over the traditional Budgens and Co-op. Don't expect quick miracles, though.
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Alan Smithee
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Consie)
untill i can shop at selfridges up here, theres a divide.
There are two in Manchester.
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fuglyduckling
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#25
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#25
(Original post by The Anthropologist)
Northerners have always voted to keep themselves away from prosperity by voting for the left and then blaming the prosperous Tory south for their ills.

Hell will freeze over before northerners vote to change their fortune ......so be it!
Do you believe:

1) If there were more Tories in local government in the N of England that the area would be more prosperous?
2) If there were a national Tory government in England the N of England would be a more prosperous area?
3) Both 1+2?

Perhaps you'd care to explain specifically WHY you believe a Tory local/national government would help . . I'd love to hear what your reasons are
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naivesincerity
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#26
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#26
(Original post by DiscoPirate)
No, not really.

If i was asked which place in the UK has the worst crime rate i'd certainly suggest a suburb of London.
I'm sure there are parts of Glasgow, Belfast, maybe Manchester etc that are as bad. Particularly Glasgow. It's murder rate is three times that of London and the worst in western Europe.
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Consie
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#27
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#27
There are two in Manchester.
manchester isnt liverpool.
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Alan Smithee
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#28
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#28
(Original post by Consie)
manchester isnt liverpool.
It's close enough.
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Consie
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#29
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#29
the catchment area for food doesnt extend past two cities, it doesnt even extend that far for specialist goods i think. So no, its not.
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gooseymcgoose
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#30
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#30
liverpool is closer to victoria, manchester (i.e. selfridges) than many 'londoners' are to oxford street.
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Consie
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#31
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#31
but scousers dont have the tube.
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gooseymcgoose
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#32
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#32
half of london doesn't :P
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Consie
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#33
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#33
how far out are you talking exacly?
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gooseymcgoose
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#34
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#34
well the entire of south london doesn't have the tube, with the exception of elephant, brixton, morden and sort of wimbledon. loads of places in north london don't have it either, like muswell hill. most people who will tell you that they live in london have to get an overground train to somewhere like london bridge, cannon st, charing cross, or a couple of buses, taking in excess of an hour. and these places still count as london boroughs, they're within zone 6 and within the M25.
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Consie
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#35
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#35
well exacly 'within the m25' is a massive area. London is a conurbation that has swallowed up dozens of cities, Liverpool is still one city. Im not exacly sure where your argument is going, but i doubt anyone has to travel for hours to get to a department store/hyper market (in terms of miles/distance).

places like selfridges by thier very nature arent placed everywhere, but theres still a difference between there being one and there not being one.
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charliehelyes
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#36
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#36
(Original post by DiscoPirate)
No, not really.

If i was asked which place in the UK has the worst crime rate i'd certainly suggest a suburb of London.
what are you on about? suburbs of London are much richer than inner city London areas. Look at kingston, merton , richmond all incredibly rich suburbs and compare them to inner city lambeth and wandsworth.
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gooseymcgoose
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#37
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#37
(Original post by Consie)
Im not exacly sure where your argument is going, but i doubt anyone has to travel for hours to get to a department store/hyper market (in terms of miles/distance).
just that if you're saying it's significant that that londoners have a selfridges, then liverpool has a selfridges too
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Consie
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#38
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#38
they dont you schlag. gosh!
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Catsmeat
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#39
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#39
(Original post by charliehelyes)
what are you on about? suburbs of London are much richer than inner city London areas. Look at kingston, merton , richmond all incredibly rich suburbs and compare them to inner city lambeth and wandsworth.
London prices are hugely inflated, the suburbs being the most indicative of this market trend. You'll find this effect radiates out into the home counties where a one hour train link into the capital of any small town can bost house prices almost indefinately. It's ridiculous, but where I used to go to school there were three bedroom terraced houses, very little room within, backing onto a railway line going for about £500,000 whereas where I live now you can get the same easily for under £200,000.

Inner city London is an exception however, and is dropping behind in social welfare and community support which it needs. If you look to cities such as Manchester, Liverpool and Birmingham, each going through a supposed "renaissance", then you'll see that there is no similar trend within London, or at least it is not so centrally organised and obvious.
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andthatswhy
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#40
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#40
i'm also surprised by the prices in kingston..norbiton...staines etc, all these towns in south west london are usually dominated by big ugy shopping centres, skanky dated high streets and general grime, yet they're the only places I've found more expensive than central london. I think the people who choose to live in these places must be rather closed minded because they haven't discovered they can live in much more scenic, well connected, less dilapidated places in north west london, north london or even outside of london entirely.

if i was going to live absolutely anywhere, it would be west london, around paddington, or if it was in a suburb i'd go northwest, somewhere like amersham.
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