Annoying american terminology

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SamTheMan
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#101
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#101
(Original post by Pencil Queen)
Austin Powers has a lot to answer for
Mike Myers is Canadian and has English parents
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PQ
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#102
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#102
(Original post by piginapoke)
And Greekisms and Latinisms, throw in a bit of German and French too.
From what I remember of the book (I'll try and wrench it back out of the hands of my father in law over the weekend...he nicks all my best books) although the roots are in greek/latin and english at the time when the colonies where established a very significant of the english used in both countries *today* is based on americanised versions of this source language.

I wish I could remember a few examples atm but a large amount of how we use verbs/adjectives in modern english was established in america before being absorbed into the queens english
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SamTheMan
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#103
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#103
(Original post by piginapoke)
Actually, how about most of the things they say?
I think we're talking about recent influence, in the past 100 years.

I'm shocked by the number of American expressions (not necessarily words) that are used in the UK now.
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theaman
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#104
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#104
(Original post by piginapoke)
And Greekisms and Latinisms, throw in a bit of German and French too.
Yes, firstly it was the Freench influence when William the Conqueror came over in 1066. From the 11th and 12th centuries, the Norman French influence began playing its part.

The 14th centuries then saw the Greek and Latin influences come into play.

It's only in the contemporary language, within the 20th century, that the American influence has had a real impact on the English language.
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Vienna
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#105
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#105
(Original post by SamTheMan)
exactly, glad we agree.
so what does this mean, "It's only when they realise that there's a place called England, from which English originates that they bother calling it American English. To them, culturally, we're non-existent. They speak English, we speak something else"
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sashh
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#106
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#106
(Original post by vienna95)
what does it have to do with England?! they speak English, we speak English. yes there are differences, but no more than there are between a scottish version or British Regional examples etc. it is not OUR language. for formal purposes it is best to differentiate between UK English and US English or as they may prefer, American. if this is not your standpoint, which is absolutely absurd, tell me how many people you know in the UK that refer to the language as 'UK English' and dont submit themselves to a charge of double standards.
Because it is our language.

It's like the term 'German' refers to the German spoken in Germany not that spoken in Austria, Italy or Switzerland.

Spanish - the term used for the major language of Spain, not that of south america.

It's a matter of English grammer. The one that comes first does not have (can't think of the word just now so I'll try differential).

Eg the daughters of Mr Smith are Ann and Emily. Ann is the oldest so she is Miss Smith, Emily is younger so she is Miss Emily Smith.

English (as spoken in England) came first so the other varieties have something in front of them to differenciate them from English

OK rant over back to the thread.

Very Unique - it either is or it isn't.

the non-existance of the word 'fortnight'
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PQ
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#107
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#107
makes mental note to find that bloody book and post a few examples of americanisms that have enriched* the english language at some point over the weekend

*although there will always be a few words that annoy the hell out of people...regardless of their etymology
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PQ
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#108
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#108
(Original post by sashh)
the non-existance of the word 'fortnight'
I've heard the word fortnight used in the simpsons (admittedly in the context of :confused: but all the same the american scriptwriters must have known what it means)
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sashh
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#109
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#109
Can also recomend David Crystal's The English Language
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Vienna
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#110
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(Original post by sashh)
Because it is our language.
it originated from the British Isles. thats it. its a language.

English (as spoken in England) came first so the other varieties have something in front of them to differenciate them from English
which is what the americans are doing, and what Gimp disagreed with(although thats a guess)
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SamTheMan
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#111
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#111
(Original post by vienna95)
so what does this mean, "It's only when they realise that there's a place called England, from which English originates that they bother calling it American English. To them, culturally, we're non-existent. They speak English, we speak something else"
Just meant that they speak English, as far as they're concerned. The fact that there are other places where English or a variant of their English is spoken, doesn't matter to them.
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Vienna
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#112
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#112
(Original post by SamTheMan)
Just meant that they speak English, as far as they're concerned. The fact that there are other places where English or a variant of their English is spoken, doesn't matter to them.
and "To them, culturally, we're non-existent. They speak English, we speak something else" ?
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theaman
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#113
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#113
(Original post by sashh)
Can also recomend David Crystal's The English Language
Yep - he's a good resource for socio-linguistics.
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PQ
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#114
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#114
(Original post by vienna95)
which is what the americans are doing, and what Gimp disagreed with.
My understanding of what Gimp was saying was that it annoyed him that the default was always US english and that in many cases there isn't an option for UK english.
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EconLou
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#115
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#115
Stephen Fry came and spoke to my school a while ago and he spoke for a while about Americans and he said some funny things. Generally, he said he really liked them as people but they did say some very odd phrases. He was filming with Meg Ryan once and after she had said her line wrong on a couple of occasions she came out with "That line just doesn't nourish me" Apparently himself and an aussie in the room were the only people who thought this was a slightly odd thing to say.
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sashh
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#116
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#116
(Original post by vienna95)
it originated from the British Isles. thats it. its a language.
no it originated in England. It's only in relatively recent History that English has been widly spoken in the other British Isles.
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SamTheMan
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#117
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#117
(Original post by sashh)
Because it is our language.

It's like the term 'German' refers to the German spoken in Germany not that spoken in Austria, Italy or Switzerland.

Spanish - the term used for the major language of Spain, not that of south america.

It's a matter of English grammer. The one that comes first does not have (can't think of the word just now so I'll try differential).

Eg the daughters of Mr Smith are Ann and Emily. Ann is the oldest so she is Miss Smith, Emily is younger so she is Miss Emily Smith.

English (as spoken in England) came first so the other varieties have something in front of them to differenciate them from English

OK rant over back to the thread.

Very Unique - it either is or it isn't.

the non-existance of the word 'fortnight'
The problem is: the Americans call their version of English "English" and don't care about other languages. The fact that it originated from the UK is irrelevant to them, and has been for over 200 years.
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Vienna
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#118
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#118
(Original post by sashh)
no it originated in England. It's only in relatively recent History that English has been widly spoken in the other British Isles.
its only in recent history that what we are conversing in now, has become to be known as English.
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SamTheMan
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#119
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#119
(Original post by vienna95)
and "To them, culturally, we're non-existent. They speak English, we speak something else" ?
"we speak something else" was a bit of a joke.

I don't watch Buffy but I remember an episode where Buffy says to Giles(who is English) "Speak English please. Or whatever language you speak in that weird country you're from".
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Vienna
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#120
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#120
(Original post by piginapoke)
Yes, from my point of view, whenever I see 'US English' as an option, I think there should be an 'English' option, but there rarely is if ever, which raises the question why specify the 'US' part, especially when there will probably be no noticeable difference between the two? Is it because Americans et al will think 'where is the US English option?'? Whoever wrote the software obviously thought putting 'US English' would be preferrable to putting English.
exactly, because they wrote it in their language but recognised that it wasnt the only form of English and defined it with a prefix. if you want multiple english versions then it is a matter for the software industry not a redefinition of national language.
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