confused about law school.

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    worried about law school. does this depend according to uni.
    are you forced to do presentations/mooting/debate in front of large groups?
    i would say i'm socially awkward and shy and i am much louder and better in small groups/one to one. nevertheless, i'd rather just make notes and ace my exams than be put in a large conference room, being forced to present something.
    would law school be correct for me?
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    Mooting and presentations are tiny and often optional parts of law school. I don't know about other unis, but at my uni, most of the law students (myself included) were at least somewhat socially awkward and did better in small groups/one-to-one. Now that I am working in a law firm, I am finding that that personality type by and large carries over.
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    (Original post by arrowhead)
    Mooting and presentations is a tiny and often optional part of law school. I don't know about other unis, but at my uni, most of the law students (myself included) were at least somewhat socially awkward and did better in small groups/one-to-one. Now that I am working in a law firm, I am finding that that personality type by and large carries over.

    Does that mean you are mostly assessed through coursework and examinations rather than practically?
    I'm thinking of Queen Marys in London.
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    (Original post by alevelstudent217)
    Does that mean you are mostly assessed through coursework and examinations rather than practically?
    I'm thinking of Queen Marys in London.
    I went to the LSE and we were assessed on our end-of-year examinations which counted for 100% of our grades in whatever modules we were studying that year.

    There was some coursework, but I think there were only 2-3 (out of 30+) law-based modules that had actual assessed coursework. Everything came down to the final exams usually.
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    (Original post by arrowhead)
    I went to the LSE and we were assessed on our end-of-year examinations which counted for 100% of our grades in whatever modules we were studying that year.

    There was some coursework, but I think there were only 2-3 (out of 30+) law-based modules that had actual assessed coursework. Everything came down to the final exams usually.
    Ah okay, thank you. How did you find it overall? I'm really worried about the workload as there's so much reading and i heard students usually stay in the library all day and night.
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    (Original post by alevelstudent217)
    Ah okay, thank you. How did you find it overall? I'm really worried about the workload as there's so much reading and i heard students usually stay in the library all day and night.
    Yeah, the workload was memorable after a fashion. I would say that different students have different styles of studying. I had a friend who spent a minimum of 3-4 hours in the library every single day doing readings and what-not. Other people may not have been the most diligent of students during term-time but knew how to buckle down and give it their all during Easter break and eaked out the grades anyway *shifts uncomfortably*

    The trick is not to get too hung up or stressed out about it. You have got in to read law at a very good uni, you're bright. Believe it and learn how to manage your time and study efficiently.
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    (Original post by arrowhead)
    Yeah, the workload was memorable after a fashion. I would say that different students have different styles of studying. I had a friend who spent a minimum of 3-4 hours in the library every single day doing readings and what-not. Other people may not have been the most diligent of students during term-time but knew how to buckle down and give it their all during Easter break and eaked out the grades anyway *shifts uncomfortably*

    The trick is not to get too hung up or stressed out about it. You have got in to read law at a very good uni, you're bright. Believe it and learn how to manage your time and study efficiently.
    thank you so much
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    (Original post by alevelstudent217)
    worried about law school. does this depend according to uni.
    are you forced to do presentations/mooting/debate in front of large groups?
    i would say i'm socially awkward and shy and i am much louder and better in small groups/one to one. nevertheless, i'd rather just make notes and ace my exams than be put in a large conference room, being forced to present something.
    would law school be correct for me?
    None of those things, they tend to be voluntary so you can do 100% academic.
    If you ever intend to practice, then i'd suggest some form of client counseling experience would be useful. Its nomally soemthing you cna volunteer for and can get you used to giving legal advice.
 
 
 
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