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    (Original post by ♥♥♥)
    but you've just contradicted yourself :confused:
    :p:
    Well, no, there is only one thing that you can listen to. No matter who says it. If anyone says "Do what your instructor tells you to do" then you can listen.

    Otherwise, nothing else.

    Shush! At least I've never put my car into reverse instead of 4th!! :p:
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    (Original post by MathematicalMind)
    Thanks so much for clearing that up for me!

    Anymore advice RE: Booking my test is still welcome though!
    Book your test when your instructor says book your test. just bring the topic up and see what they say.

    I go into 4th on a 30, in a diesel with a big engine, since thats what my instructor told me to do - economical! So maybe ask your instructor what they think?
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    (Original post by ~Kirsty~)
    Book your test when your instructor says book your test. just bring the topic up and see what they say.

    I go into 4th on a 30, in a diesel with a big engine, since thats what my instructor told me to do - economical! So maybe ask your instructor what they think?
    It's weird, because between 30-40 the engine is growling a bit and I know that in 40 it would feel smoother, it's not REALLY bad, just, you know, it would be nicer in 4th. I think the reason for keeping it in 3rd though is to have more control over the car, as you lose some when you go up the gears
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    Well, no, there is only one thing that you can listen to. No matter who says it. If anyone says "Do what your instructor tells you to do" then you can listen.

    Otherwise, nothing else.

    Shush! At least I've never put my car into reverse instead of 4th!! :p:
    I was getting all panicky ok I hate it when I get myself in a tizz!
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    (Original post by ♥♥♥)
    I was getting all panicky ok I hate it when I get myself in a tizz!
    Aww ;console; don't get yourself into a tizz!

    My Dad's car is quite handy because there's a little button on the underside of the gearstick which you have to press to get it into reverse, if you don't press it, it won't let you go into it. Genius
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    Aww ;console; don't get yourself into a tizz!

    My Dad's car is quite handy because there's a little button on the underside of the gearstick which you have to press to get it into reverse, if you don't press it, it won't let you go into it. Genius
    that is GENIUS! wowwww!
    what reg is it?!
    It didn't actually reverse it just made a really horrible crunching noise.
    MY ADI's eyes almost popped out of his head(holding in the anger, thank god he had a fag before my lesson eh? lmao).
    I love it when you don't have to stop for ages like roundabouts are clear, glide round just changing gears, such a great feeling makes me so relaxed!
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    (Original post by ♥♥♥)
    that is GENIUS! wowwww!
    what reg is it?!
    It didn't actually reverse it just made a really horrible crunching noise.
    MY ADI's eyes almost popped out of his head(holding in the anger, thank god he had a fag before my lesson eh? lmao).
    I love it when you don't have to stop for ages like roundabouts are clear, glide round just changing gears, such a great feeling makes me so relaxed!
    It's a pretty new Astra, reg 54 - so when is that? Is that 2004? Whatever.

    And in fairness, last week I was on the A19...big dual carriageway near me, and was going about 60, but dropping speed, went to move from 5th to 4th and instead went into 2nd The car didn't like that!!! Haha, my instructor was like "WTF?" haha.

    And yeah, it's nice not having to stop, but sometimes I feel cheated, like you're coming to a roundabout that you know is always really hectic and you're all geared up and ready for it and then it's empty and you're like "Ohh, I wanted to show my skillz" Honestly, I would like a few challenges in my test on Tuesday, as long as I can get through them, a really easy test would just seem like I've cheated! :rolleyes:
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    How long have you been learning dobbs? Is it your first test? Good Luck
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    It's a pretty new Astra, reg 54 - so when is that? Is that 2004? Whatever.

    And in fairness, last week I was on the A19...big dual carriageway near me, and was going about 60, but dropping speed, went to move from 5th to 4th and instead went into 2nd The car didn't like that!!! Haha, my instructor was like "WTF?" haha.

    And yeah, it's nice not having to stop, but sometimes I feel cheated, like you're coming to a roundabout that you know is always really hectic and you're all geared up and ready for it and then it's empty and you're like "Ohh, I wanted to show my skillz" Honestly, I would like a few challenges in my test on Tuesday, as long as I can get through them, a really easy test would just seem like I've cheated! :rolleyes:
    Sept 04 so yeah only 3 years old.
    That's such a simple but really good idea! my ADI's beast is 9 months older.
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    (Original post by MathematicalMind)
    How long have you been learning dobbs? Is it your first test? Good Luck
    I started learning in the 2nd week of September, so I've been learning for 7 weeks now. But I've been unemployed (ha!) as graduated in June but worked all summer and have, in the past 7 weeks, spent £600 on 32 hours worth of lessons and also had a bit of private practice. Seriously have concentrated so hard on it - like when I'm not having lessons I'm looking up info on the internet, and this forum has been really handy too!

    A key thing is to be thinking about your driving quite a lot, don't just think "Oh I have my lesson now, let's think about driving" then when you finish, you stop it. Having a little driving journal and noting down what you did in each lesson, problems you had, and jotting down little aims for your next lesson (i.e. "Don't forget to check mirrors before changing speed" or "Handbrake is only used to hold the car, not to stop it!" etc.) will really help you.

    My instructor continuously says how impressed he is with my development from lesson to lesson. I remember a lot of stuff, so when he's like "Right up here you're going to turn left, now remember it's a tight corner and straight after it..." and I'll go "There's a mini roundabout which has a hidden right turn, I know!" hehe

    (Original post by ♥♥♥)
    Sept 04 so yeah only 3 years old.
    That's such a simple but really good idea! my ADI's beast is 9 months older.
    My ADI's car is less than a month old! Since I'm with the AA then each instructor gets a brand new car every 3 months, ha! So I started in a car which was just about 3 months old, then got a new car which was brand new. It's lovely But I like my Dad's Astra better, only because it feels smoother.
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    I started learning in the 2nd week of September, so I've been learning for 7 weeks now. But I've been unemployed (ha!) as graduated in June but worked all summer and have, in the past 7 weeks, spent £600 on 32 hours worth of lessons and also had a bit of private practice. Seriously have concentrated so hard on it - like when I'm not having lessons I'm looking up info on the internet, and this forum has been really handy too!

    A key thing is to be thinking about your driving quite a lot, don't just think "Oh I have my lesson now, let's think about driving" then when you finish, you stop it. Having a little driving journal and noting down what you did in each lesson, problems you had, and jotting down little aims for your next lesson (i.e. "Don't forget to check mirrors before changing speed" or "Handbrake is only used to hold the car, not to stop it!" etc.) will really help you.

    My instructor continuously says how impressed he is with my development from lesson to lesson. I remember a lot of stuff, so when he's like "Right up here you're going to turn left, now remember it's a tight corner and straight after it..." and I'll go "There's a mini roundabout which has a hidden right turn, I know!" hehe



    My ADI's car is less than a month old! Since I'm with the AA then each instructor gets a brand new car every 3 months, ha! So I started in a car which was just about 3 months old, then got a new car which was brand new. It's lovely But I like my Dad's Astra better, only because it feels smoother.
    my ADI's car is really a lovely drive tbh. I mean it isn't the newest and flashest car but it's a really nice drive, so smooth and just like putty in your hands. Tbh the ADI's with KA's piss me off :p: sorry random but that is literally just to pass your test in isn't it? It's not getting you used to other cars as a KA is pretty tiny!
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    i love my ADI's car too -perhaps the 1.9 engine has something to do with it... but its such an easy to car to drive.
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    (Original post by ♥♥♥)
    my ADI's car is really a lovely drive tbh. I mean it isn't the newest and flashest car but it's a really nice drive, so smooth and just like putty in your hands. Tbh the ADI's with KA's piss me off :p: sorry random but that is literally just to pass your test in isn't it? It's not getting you used to other cars as a KA is pretty tiny!
    What is your ADI's car?
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    What is your ADI's car?
    new ford fiesta.
    not massive not tiny, about right!
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    Wow, i find it unbelievable how quickly you all go in for your tests. I must have had about 8 hours tuition before i started manouvres, and it took about 3 lessons to get each right. I have been learning over a year now, and one of my manouvres i still keep forgetting (reverse park).

    I know its not a competition and some people learn quicker than others but passing your test might be the target but just remember its so much better to spend as much time as possible gaining as much experience as you can whilst being a learner because it will set you up so well for when you pass.

    Dont just think because you can drive it means you will pass. Of course, in theory, it does help, but imo experience is essential for the road out there and the more you drive about and experience different things, even if there's no way they'll appear on your test (like driving in the dark) you will feel so much better once you've passed, you will feel so confident.

    There's more to driving than just being able to put your car into gear or reversing round a corner. I've learnt the hard way. It's also why so many people go for the pass plus once they pass.
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    I must of had about 20-30 hrs private practice(and counting!) and about 35-50 hours tuition(and counting). I've experienced lots(being an understatement).
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    (Original post by jenren22)
    Wow, i find it unbelievable how quickly you all go in for your tests. I must have had about 8 hours tuition before i started manouvres, and it took about 3 lessons to get each right. I have been learning over a year now, and one of my manouvres i still keep forgetting (reverse park).

    I know its not a competition and some people learn quicker than others but passing your test might be the target but just remember its so much better to spend as much time as possible gaining as much experience as you can whilst being a learner because it will set you up so well for when you pass.

    Dont just think because you can drive it means you will pass. Of course, in theory, it does help, but imo experience is essential for the road out there and the more you drive about and experience different things, even if there's no way they'll appear on your test (like driving in the dark) you will feel so much better once you've passed, you will feel so confident.

    There's more to driving than just being able to put your car into gear or reversing round a corner. I've learnt the hard way. It's also why so many people go for the pass plus once they pass.
    I agree. My 1st instructor took me driving in the dark just for experience, and my current instructor took me on a dual carriageway for 2 hours to get me a little more confident when i would eventually encounter motorways.

    I've been learning since around july, i have 2 hours every week, i think i'm at test standard, but i'll do pass plus for the extra exerience, when i pass my test since i feel its vital. I've been lucky i've had instructors whose goal has not to let me just paass the test but also gain invaluable experience.
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    (Original post by jenren22)
    There's more to driving than just being able to put your car into gear or reversing round a corner. I've learnt the hard way. It's also why so many people go for the pass plus once they pass.
    I understand what you're saying, and it's why I don't encourage the stupid intensive "one week" courses. A bit pointless.

    However although it may seem like I've only been learning for 7 weeks, I have dedicated a lot of my time to learning about driving, reading up on it, writing notes, keeping a journal, etc etc. And in that time I've had plenty of lessons, and driven in my Dad's car - this has included driving in INTENSE rainfall (I couldn't see very far ahead!), at night, in fog (weirdly enough haha), and at all times of the day (damn sunlight in my eyes!). I feel that I know the roads really well now.

    Also, I can't stress enough how helpful it is to simply be a passenger in a car. For the past few years I have been a passenger and I take note of what's going on around me, I always have the sun visor thing down in my Dad's car to use the mirror in it to look behind us, getting used to noting what's going on behind the car. Etc etc. Proof of this is that my older sister has just started learning, but hasn't been around in cars much, and so hasn't got a clue what she's doing/why she's doing it.

    I haven't spent 3 lessons on each manouvre, why? Because I got them all straight away. They're not hard because I feel I understand the physics of driving, weirdly enough from driving games like GTA haha! Crazy but true!! Little things like this can help massively.

    I think for someone who starts from scratch, yes, it takes a while. But if you're determined, and actually know a lot about the general driving habits beforehand, you can get it sorted in a much smaller time.

    I honestly think that my "driving attention" whatever you want to call it, is better than my technical side of driving. Being able to see what's up ahead, what to do, etc. is something I'm happy to say that I'm very very good at, mainly from having been a passenger a lot and noted these things myself
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    To be honest its not necessarily my instructor that has given me all that experience. I am lucky in that my mum has the same car as my lesson car so she put me on the insurance. I used to do ALOT of driving outside of lessons, mainly just driving around getting confidence. I dont so much now i've started uni, but i still drive at weekends and it helps so much. I have driven in floods, the heaviest rain possible, every time of day, including dark, in 2 different cities and have even been taught how to park by my mum!

    I also had a break from driving due to illness and instead of my instructor getting me on test routes he let me drive around Leeds for two lessons to get my confidence back. He's also taught me how to put petrol in the car. He plays games with me as well, such as who can see the hazard first, and that really helped my forward planning. Im not too good with that sometimes...short attention span :p:.
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    I understand what you're saying, and it's why I don't encourage the stupid intensive "one week" courses. A bit pointless.

    However although it may seem like I've only been learning for 7 weeks, I have dedicated a lot of my time to learning about driving, reading up on it, writing notes, keeping a journal, etc etc. And in that time I've had plenty of lessons, and driven in my Dad's car - this has included driving in INTENSE rainfall (I couldn't see very far ahead!), at night, in fog (weirdly enough haha), and at all times of the day (damn sunlight in my eyes!). I feel that I know the roads really well now.

    Also, I can't stress enough how helpful it is to simply be a passenger in a car. For the past few years I have been a passenger and I take note of what's going on around me, I always have the sun visor thing down in my Dad's car to use the mirror in it to look behind us, getting used to noting what's going on behind the car. Etc etc. Proof of this is that my older sister has just started learning, but hasn't been around in cars much, and so hasn't got a clue what she's doing/why she's doing it.

    I haven't spent 3 lessons on each manouvre, why? Because I got them all straight away. They're not hard because I feel I understand the physics of driving, weirdly enough from driving games like GTA haha! Crazy but true!! Little things like this can help massively.

    I think for someone who starts from scratch, yes, it takes a while. But if you're determined, and actually know a lot about the general driving habits beforehand, you can get it sorted in a much smaller time.

    I honestly think that my "driving attention" whatever you want to call it, is better than my technical side of driving. Being able to see what's up ahead, what to do, etc. is something I'm happy to say that I'm very very good at, mainly from having been a passenger a lot and noted these things myself
    No, thats perfectly fine. If you dedicate all your time at the start and gain experience that way, there's no problem.

    It's those who drive for a few weeks, go in for the test, manage to pass somehow with little experience and then get a huge shock once they pass.
 
 
 
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